Census question could hurt all of us

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcyEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion When Commerce Secretary Ross announced that the census questionnaire will include a question about citizenship in the 2020 census, he made a decision that will have a negative impact on residents of the Capital Region and in communities around this country. It might seem like an innocuous question, but it is likely to cause fear in the immigrant community and result in substantial undercounting.Many resource allocation decisions are made on the basis of census data. Money for public safety planning and disaster response, education needs, hospitals, veterans’ assistance, transportation, aid to cities, and much else is allocated at least partially by how many people live where. Our business developers use  census data to choose where and how to invest. Undercounting makes all these decisions less efficient, and thus harms us all.The League of Women Voters of Schenectady County calls on our local officials to speak out and oppose the citizenship question in the 2020 census. We must send a strong message to have Congress reverse this decision and remove the citizenship question from the census. The stakes are too high to allow this unnecessary question to derail the count.Cheryl NechamenSchenectadyThe writer is president of the League of Women Voters of Schenectady County.last_img read more

Retail

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MWB to make £500m move into corporate outsourcing

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All-time high for property lending

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Vernon’s Green bid looking good

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The odd one out

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A wait on the mind

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Soho’s redemption

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COVID-19: Indonesia bars people from hardest-hit regions in Iran, South Korea, Italy

first_imgPassengers entering Indonesia from the three countries — all of which have recorded thousands of COVID-19 cases, the most after China — are required to fill in a health alert card (HAC) issued by the Indonesian Health Ministry.Especially for Indonesian citizens, those who arrived in the archipelago from the aforementioned regions in Iran, South Korea and Italy, would be required to undergo additional medical examinations at the port of entry, Retno said. The policy will enter into force at midnight on Sunday, March 8, and will continue to be evaluated in accordance with global developments, Retno said.On Wednesday, the WHO recorded 2,223 new cases of COVID-19 infections worldwide and another 48 deaths outside China. The number of affected countries has reached 76, with Argentina, Chile, Poland and Ukraine having just reported their first cases of the virus.Topics : “Therefore, Indonesia is to temporarily impose a new policy for travelers from those countries,” she added. The policy will affect people who have a recent history of travel to Tehran, Qom and Gilan in Iran; Lombardi, Venetto, Emilia-Romagna, Marche and Piedmont regions in Italy; as well as Daegu and Gyeongsangbuk-do in South Korea.“Travelers from Iran, Italy and South Korea who come from outside of the aforementioned regions will need to provide a valid health certificate that is accredited and issued by the health authorities,” Retno said, adding that the document must be shown during check-in. “Without a health certificate, travelers will be denied entry or transit in Indonesia,” the minister went on. Indonesia announced on Thursday new travel restrictions for people with a history of travel from coronavirus-hit regions of Iran, South Korea and Italy in the wake of a significant surge of COVID-19 cases globally.The temporary ban, which will come into effect on Sunday, would prevent people who had visited certain regions in the three countries in the last 14 days from visiting or transiting in Indonesia, Foreign Minister Retno LP Marsudi said.“After reviewing a report from the World Health Organization [WHO], there has been an increase of cases outside China, especially in three countries: Iran, Italy and South Korea,” Retno told journalists in her office on Thursday. last_img read more

BI injects $10.1b to stabilize bond markets as investors dump Indonesian assets

first_imgThe central bank pledged to work together with the government and the Financial Services Authority (OJK) to develop further measures to stabilize the country’s financial market. Perry said the current situation was different compared to the 1998 and 2008 financial crises as the it was faced by financial markets and investors around the globe.Read also: Investors question government’s transparency in handling COVID-19 crisis“Investors and market players dumped all their assets in stocks, bonds and gold and cashed them into dollars. All countries experienced the same thing, including Indonesia,” he added.Indonesia has recorded 308 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and 25 deaths as of Thursday. Globally, the pneumonia-like illness has infected more than 244,000 people and claimed at least 10,000 lives.The central bank slashed its benchmark interest rate, the BI seven-day reverse repo rate, by 25 basis points to 4.50 percent following another cut last month to help spur the weakening economy.BI revised down on Thursday Indonesia’s economic growth projection to between 4.2 percent and 4.6 percent this year, which would be the lowest levels since 2005. That compares with last month’s projection of between 5 and 5.4 percent.It also announced measures to calm the market rout and stabilize the rupiah, including by intensifying bond-buying in the secondary market and cutting banks’ reserve ratio. Topics : Read also: BI cuts rate, sees growth plunging to 15-year low as COVID-19 roils economyBI data recorded Rp 105.1 trillion in capital outflow as of Thursday, of which foreign investors dumped Rp 92.8 trillion worth of government bonds and Rp 8.3 trillion in stocks.The rupiah has weakened more than 15 percent against the this year to Rp 16,172 per dollar as of 3:14 p.m. in Jakarta, a level unseen since the 1998 crisis. The Jakarta Composite Index (JCI), meanwhile, recorded more than Rp 10 trillion in foreign net sell so far this year as it lost around 33 percent of its value.“The majority of capital flight occurred in March in line with escalating COVID-19 infections in developing countries. This has resulted in investors dumping their assets and converting them into dollars,” Perry went on to say.center_img Bank Indonesia (BI) has bought about Rp 163 trillion (US$10.1 billion) worth of government bonds to stabilize the country’s financial market amid foreign investors’ selling spree over COVID-19 fears.In addition to the bonds purchase, the central bank also intervened in the foreign exchange spot market and domestic non-deliverables forward to ease pressures on the rupiah.“We are focused on maintaining confidence, ensuring the market mechanism to work properly and maintain liquidity in US dollars and the rupiah,” BI Governor Perry Warjiyo said after attending a limited Cabinet meeting on Friday.last_img read more