Findings show ancient birds died in flash flood

first_img Primitive birds shared dinosaurs’ fate (PhysOrg.com) — During a presentation at the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology’s 71st annual Meeting in Las Vegas, researchers Gareth Dyke and Darren Naish from the University of Southampton presented their findings of the first known Mesozoic bird colony remains. The discovery was made in the Sebes area of Transylvania, Romania and includes a large collection of bird fossils and eggs, both partial and whole, trapped within the limestone. It is believed that this colony of birds was wiped out when a flash flood hit the area some 100 million years ago. The prehistoric birds belonged to the enantiornithines and had claws and saw-like beaks with teeth. They had clawed fingers on their wings but, besides these features, these birds resembled modern day birds. These birds are an extinct branch of modern birds but researchers have been unable to determine why these became extinct while other ancestors lived for much longer.This is the first evidence that ancient birds nested near the water similar to how ducks do now. It is also the first time full, well-preserved eggs have been found and researchers hope this will help them learn about the biology of these animals. Finding whole and preserved eggs, researchers say this will allow them to figure out the size and the volume of the bird’s eggs for the first time.The location where this fossilized nesting ground was discovered has been rich in other remains as well. Researchers have also discovered the remains of a predatory bird-like dinosaur known as a Balaur, small rodent animals, a dwarf plant-eating dinosaur and one of the world’s largest pterosaurs. Back during the Cretaceous period, Romania was a large island and apparently filled with many different species of animals. One thing the researchers do note is that to date, there doesn’t seem to be any evidence of the big predatory type dinosaurs in this area. Explore further © 2011 PhysOrg.com Citation: Findings show ancient birds died in flash flood (2011, November 14) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2011-11-ancient-birds-died.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Fermilab documenting construction of NOvA—next generation neutrino experiment w video

first_imgThe NOvA experiment uses two detectors: a 222 metric-ton near detector at Fermilab and a much larger 15 metric-kiloton far detector (pictured here) in Minnesota just south of the U.S.-Canada border. Scientists will detect a small fraction of the neutrinos in a near-detector at Fermilab and in a larger far-detector in Minnesota looking for signals that the neutrinos are changing from one type to another on their trip. Citation: Fermilab documenting construction of NOvA—next generation neutrino experiment (w/ video) (2014, February 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-fermilab-documenting-novanext-neutrino-video.html More information: www-nova.fnal.gov/ Fermilab sends first neutrino beam to NOvA experiment Explore further Neutrinos are subatomic particles, electrically neutral and still rather mysterious. Scientists believe that studying them may help lead to fully understanding what everything in the universe is ultimately made of—may physicists believe that unlike other particles, neutrinos don’t get their mass from the famous Higgs boson . Another unique thing about neutrinos is that they don’t interact much with other regular matter, instead they tend to pass right through it—billions of them are passing through each of us every second.To better understand neutrinos, researchers would like to know what happens to them as they travel, that’s what’s behind NOvA—a project that has an international team of physicists, engineers, technicians and even students building a massive two part experiment. The first part is essentially a neutrino gun—located in Batavia, Illinois—it will create neutrinos and fire them at the second site located in Ash River, Minnesota—it’s over 500 miles away which means the neutrino beam will have to travel through portions of the Earth to get there. Upon arrival, the neutrinos will be captured by a very large (14,000 ton) piece of plastic that has been fashioned into liquid filled chambers, each with neutrino detecting gear.By all measures it’s a massive project, and Fermilab clearly wants the public to know where its tax dollars are being spent. They’ve hired video professionals to not only document the construction of the two facilities, but to interview many of the people involved in the effort, from physicists, to site managers to students volunteering to help. (Phys.org) —Fermilab, run by the U.S. Department of Energy is going to great lengths to document and make known the work that is being done to build the country’s next generation neutrino experiment—a twin campus endeavor known as NOvA that will shoot neutrino’s from one site to another located over 500 miles apart. In documenting the project, Fermilab is opening a window into the vast network of people and processes that are needed to undertake building a modern physics research facility. It also helps explain why it’s so expensive, even when there is a lot of free labor provided by students.The basic equipment at both sites is expected to be completed and installed sometime this spring—the electronics will be put in later this summer. © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Fish found to communicate with one another using urine

first_img Prior research has shown that some species of animals use urine as a means to communicate with one another. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn if fish might also do so, because it seemed logical—they are not able to speak and could easily transmit chemicals through water via urine.To find out, they inserted a partition in the middle of a fish tank that prevented fish on either side from interacting physically with one another. In some scenarios, the barrier had tiny holes to allow water to pass between the sides, while in others it did not. Also, some barriers were opaque and others were transparent. In addition, the researchers injected the fish with a blue dye that allowed them to see and measure urine being expelled by the fish once in the tank.The researchers measured how much urine was expelled under a variety of situations—in which only one fish was in the tank; in which there were two but they could not see each other; in which there were two and they could see each other but were or were not able to communicate via urine through the barrier—the team also used a variety of fish sizes and noted fish behavior throughout each test.The researchers looked at their results and noted that when two fish saw one another in the tank, they raised their fins and approached each other in an aggressive manner, and both emitted more urine than when they were not able to see another fish. Also, they found that only when the urine was allowed to move through the barrier was there a noticeable change in behavior of the fish—in such cases, the smaller fish generally reduced its aggressiveness, yielding to the larger one. Interestingly, the researchers also noted that when the urine was not able to pass through the barrier and the fish were able to see one another, both emitted more urine than in any other scenario, apparently aware that their message was not getting through. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of Bern in Switzerland has found that at least one species of fish communicates with others of its kind using chemicals in its urine. In their paper published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, the team outlines experiments they conducted with a cichlid fish and what they discovered. Neolamprologus pulcher. Credit: Guérin Nicolas/Wikipedia Citation: Fish found to communicate with one another using urine (2017, February 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-fish-urine.html Journal information: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology More information: Dario-Marcos Bayani et al. To pee or not to pee: urine signals mediate aggressive interactions in the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (2017). DOI: 10.1007/s00265-016-2260-6AbstractThe communication of aggressive propensity is an important component of agonistic interactions. For this purpose, animals use different sensory modalities involving visual, acoustical and chemical cues. While visual and acoustic communication used in aggressive encounters has been studied extensively in a wide range of taxa, the role of chemical communication received less attention. Here, we studied the role of chemical cues used during agonistic interactions of territory owners in the cooperative cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher. During staged encounters, we allowed either visual and chemical contact between two contestants or visual contact only. As chemical information in this species is most likely transferred via urine, we measured urination patterns using dye injections. Furthermore, we recorded aggressive and submissive behaviours of both contestants in response to the experimental treatment. Fish that had only visual contact with each other significantly increased their urination frequency and showed more aggressive displays compared to fish with both visual and chemical contact. Furthermore, appropriate agonistic responses appear to be dependent on available chemical information. This indicates that N. pulcher actively emits chemical signals to communicate their aggressive propensity via urine. Chemical communication thus plays a crucial role in multimodal communication of aggression in these fish, which highlights the need of studying the role of chemical communication during agonistic encounters in general, even if other signals are more obvious to the human observer.center_img Explore further © 2017 Phys.org Tokyo aquarium baffled by mystery fish deaths This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Remembering Ghalib in light and poetry

first_imgIn its 12th year of celebrations, Yaadgare-e-Ghalib initiated by the Ghalib Memorial Movement with the support of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations (ICCR) and the Delhi Government, will take Delhiites back in time.‘The highlight of Yaadgare-e-Ghalib  this year is the remarkable transformation of Ghalib’s haveli with the objective to make the haveli an important landmark on the heritage tourism trail of Delhi,’ says Dr Suresh Goel, director general, ICCR. Mirza Ghalib spent time at this haveli from 1860 to 1869.The three-day event started from 26 December and conclude on 28 December. The event will mark the birth anniversary of the great poet, Mirza Ghalib. The highlight will also be a film on his life, mushaira by eminent poets from the Indian sub-continent and an exhibition on Ghalib’s rare and priceless memorabilia at his haveli.A candle-light procession from Town Hall to Gali Qasim Jaan, Chandni Chowk started the event. The procession was led by lyricist Gulzar, author and diplomat Pavan Varma, and Ustad Iqbal Ahmed Khan, a Delhi gharana musician, among other leading artists.The final day will have Urdu comic play by Peirrots Troupe –Ghalib in New Delhi at the India Islamic Centre.‘At Ghalib’s haveli, there will be a sound track of works related to Ghalib. Special care was taken to put together historic letters and other memorabilia of the legendary poet.These priceless exhibits will be on display as a permanent feature by ICCR,’ says kathak danseuse Uma Sharma, who is also the founder of the Ghalib Memorial Movement.last_img read more

Recreating shades and moods

first_imgAfter presenting a series of inspiring and astonishing artworks at various exhibitions in India and across the world, Indian contemporary artist Swaraj Das is bringing his current series of work to the Capital. Titled, Light and Life, a solo painting exhibition will showcase various shades of life in colours.The abstracts in Das’s paintings, are the images of his life experiences, through melting and overlapping colours to make his paintings more defining and exuberant. His work aims at capturing various colours, phases and moods, from streets narrowed by building-blocks, morning light, monsoon, afternoon, midday and more to do with various aspects of life and nature. In a nut shell, Das has de-constructed images in order to create them anew. His paintings are recreational in nature encompassing experiences manifesting themselves in melting and overlapping colours, water colours, street scapes and figure work.last_img read more

For the beauty that matters

first_imgThe workshop was to make Indian beauty professionals more educated, advanced and technology friendly so that they can treat their clients with better product and offer better treatments. The event was graced by Ravi Mittal (Managing director of SKEYNDOR India) and many salon owners and beauty professionals from across the country. The first day of the workshop started with brief introduction on Skeyndor products, Skin analysis and the products to be opting for the treatments for different skin types and the use of skincare machines. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Anti ageing treatments for professional as well as home care products was the topic to be talked about on the following day. The workshop was carried a practical session on using the corrective line and the mesoscience machine. The closing day got a session for acne prone skin and the treatments for it with clear balance. It also demonstrated the treatments for burning down of fats and getting a perfect body with body sculpt and Skeyndor Spa Line products. The event winded up with distribution of training completion certificate to all the beauty professionals.last_img read more

Two decades of a Mistresspiece

first_imgRoughly 21 years back, a younger Nasreen had written, ‘In the name of religion, there has been bloodshed, disturbance and persecution.’ It was then, in 1993, that her celebrated novel Lajja was first published in Bengali. Bangladesh banned it soon after, condemning her to an exile that she has been fighting ever since. It’s been 20 years of Lajja, and Nasreen’s struggle for survival – literary, political, womanly. Marking the 20th anniversary of this seminal text, a fresh translation into English has been published by Penguin recently. Nasreen, who lives in South Delhi and often spends her evenings buying fish from Chittaranjan Park, couldn’t be happier. Her visa has been recently extended by the Indian government for another year. It’s a permanent battle as far as her domicile is concerned, but she’s not afraid to wage it. Bengal is out of bounds: fanatics want her head. But in the relative secular seclusion of South Delhi, Nasreen drowns her sorrows in a late night peg, snuggling along her cat Minoo. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Lajja came right in the heels of Babri Masjid demolition in Ayodhya. On 6 December 1992, RSS karsevaks brought down the 500-year-old mosque in the contested Ram Janmabhoomi, and the shadow of that historic tragedy fell on neighbouring Bangladesh. Lajja charted how the raging fire of communal anger swept through Dhaka as a Hindu family bore the brunt of the manic event. Translated by activist-turned-writer Anchita Ghatak, the new edition comes with updates. ‘This is like a documentary novel. There are fictional characters but is based on facts. Lajja has been a bestseller for a very long time. It has been published and translated in almost all Indian languages and also many foreign languages like French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, etc,’ Nasreen was heard saying at the book launch. She has been dubbed ‘anti-Islamic’ by fringe lunatics of Bangladesh, particularly those hobnobbing with the Khaleda Zia-led Bangladesh Nationalist Party and the Jamaat. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixShe wears it as a badge of honour, flaunting her atheism while declaring compassion for those in Gaza, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Pakistan and of course Bangladesh.  She says her support was for the late Maqbool Fida Hussain, who was compelled to spend his last days in Qatar. She openly bats for Iranian bloggers who took on the neurotic Ahmedinejad.  Her other works such as Dwikhondito, Amar Meyebela, among others have been subjects of controversy. But her quips are often littered with seething irony: ‘If you don’t hurt people’s sentiments, you don’t need freedom of expression.’ Between The Covers is a weekly column on reading up and rating downlast_img read more

Calcutta HC extends by a day stay on Bengal panchayat polls process

first_imgKolkata: The Calcutta High Court on Monday extended by a day till Tuesday its stay on the West Bengal’s panchayat election process.A single-judge bench of Justice Subrata Talukdar extended the stay till 2 p.m. on Tuesday in view of an appeal filed before a Division Bench of the High Court against the stay. A Division Bench of Justice Biswanath Samaddar and Justice Arindam Mukherjee is slated to hear the case at 4.30 p.m. on Monday.Justice Talukdar had, on Thursday, stayed the election process till April 16 on a petition by the Bharatiya Janata Party and asked the State Election Commission (SEC) to furnish by that date a comprehensive status report on the polls. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsOn Monday, BJP representative Pratap Banerjee furnished a bond of Rs five lakh as fine imposed by the court on the party for “misrepresenting facts” by moving both the Supreme Court and the High Court on the same plea.Justice Talukdar also permitted the state Congress President Adhir Chowdhury to become a party in the case, overruling objections from Trinamool Congress counsel Kalyan Banerjee.The two opposition parties have moved the court, accusing the ruling Trinamool Congress of unleashing massive pre-poll violence against their party workers to prevent them from filing nominations for the polls ever since the process began on April 2. The two parties also called the SEC a puppet of the ruling TMC after the poll panel withdrew its earlier order of extending the filing of nominations by a day, within a few hours of issuing the order last week.The panchayat elections were originally scheduled for May 1, 3 and 5, with the counting of votes slated on May 8.last_img read more

Tripura has highest no of manual scavengers

first_imgTripura has the highest percentage of manual scavenger with 2.50 per cent of its rural population still engaged in this menial work, according to the Socio Economic and Caste Census (SECC) 2011.Successive governments since independence have tried to eradicate this through legislation but this is still prevalent, though in very small percentage, across the country.All India average for manual scavenger in rural India is 0.10 per cent, or 18.06 lakh, across the country. Tripura (17,332) is followed by Mizoram with 0.92 per cent of population still pursuing manual scavenging.As many as nine states and one union territory of Delhi has zero number of manual scavenger. The states which have eradicated this are Gujarat, Himachal Pradesh, Goa, Telangana, Andhra Pradesh, Tamil Nadu, Kerala, Manipur and Assam. As far as percentage of legally released bonded labour is concerned, the all India average is 0.12 per cent or 2.06 lakh.Tripura again has the highest percentage of legally released bonded labour with 7.31 per cent or 50,716. This is followed by Arunachal Pradesh with 0.7 per cent. With regard to Primitive Tribal Group, the census revealed that 0.59 per cent of the total population falls under this.last_img read more

Sex racket busted 4 held

first_imgKolkata: South 24-Parganas police busted a sex racket from Sonarpur and arrested four persons including three women for their alleged involvement in the incident.This comes barely a month after a similar sex racket had been busted in the same district. Acting on a tip off, the police from Sonarpur conducted a raid at a house situated in Bose Pukur area on late Tuesday night.Police came to know that a sex racket was operating from a house situated in the area and decided to carry out an operation. The locals told police that people from outside used to visit the house till late night. On holidays, more number people used to visit the house and this had aroused the suspicion of the locals.The owner of the house Samir Mondal has also been arrested in this connection. The investigating officers recovered some liquor bottles and some hard cash from the possession of the accused. According to the preliminary investigation, police suspect illegal activities was going on from the house for quite sometime.Police are conducting raids at various places and bars in the district following the incident. Police came to know that the house owner used to hire these women from various parts of the state and outside for running the business. Police are conducting a detailed probe in this regard. They will crack down on these sex rackets gradually if there is any in the district. The accused admitted their involvement in the racket.last_img read more