Theres No Place Like Home For John Isner

John Isner became the top-ranked American male tennis player by playing his best tennis at home. He wins more than two-thirds of his matches in the U.S., but just half elsewhere. Tennis writers have portrayed Isner’s strength at home as a weakness abroad. But in his sport, where players set large parts of their own schedules, displaying a repeatable competitive advantage is an opportunity, not a liability.1Unlike, say, in the NBA, where an Eastern Conference team that struggles out west can’t replace trips to California with more home dates.Even as he’s pledged to solve his road woes, Isner has filled his calendar with U.S. events. His home-court advantage has helped him rise this month from the world’s No. 13 to No. 10. A couple of weeks ago at a tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., Isner reached the semifinals, where he took a set off No. 2 Novak Djokovic. This week in Miami, he reached the round of 16 but lost on Tuesday to No. 7 Tomas Berdych. In two weeks, Isner will seek to defend his title in Houston.These wouldn’t have passed for spectacular American results when Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras ruled the sport in the 1990s, or even when Andy Roddick and James Blake took up residence in the top 10 during the last decade. These days, though, pretty good is as good as it gets for American men in tennis. None of Isner’s peers got past the round of 64 at either tournament this month; he was the last American man at each by at least two rounds. And no other American man is ranked in the top 60 in the world. (There’s little reason to hope for better things from the next generation: No American ranks in the top 20 in either the under-20 or under-21 world rankings.)Isner is famous among casual fans for his role in the longest match ever played, which he won over Nicolas Mahut at Wimbledon in 2010, with the basketball-like 70-68 score in the fifth set. But he’s done his best work at home. Fourteen of his 17 career finals and six of his eight career titles have come in the United States. He’s been an entirely average player at the tour level2This means matches that count towards a player’s official match record: matches at Grand Slam tournaments, in Davis Cup matches and at ATP World Tour events. away from the U.S., winning 51 percent of his matches. At American events, he’s won 69 percent.“I always play my best in the United States,” Isner said at a press conference in Indian Wells. “A lot of times, especially in Europe, I have ‑‑ you know, I haven’t had great results at all.” He was at a loss to explain why, offering perhaps a lack of toughness at overseas tournaments. “There is no reason I can’t have a result like this outside of the U.S.,” he said.The reasons for Isner’s home advantage are varied. The obvious suspects, like the surface he’s playing on and the strength of his opponents, don’t fully explain it. A lot of it comes down to Isner himself.It’s true that much of Isner’s home success has come against weak competition. He has thrived at smaller U.S. tournaments that are optional for top players, who mostly live in Europe and don’t bother to make the trip. These events account for all of his U.S. titles and all but two of his U.S. finals. Just 6 percent of his matches at those events have come against top 10 players, none ranked in the top four. The relative weakness of his competition thanks to these events can be seen in the median ranking of his opponents over the last year: just 64, making his the softest schedule of any player in the top 35 in the world rankings.Isner also gets to play on hard courts, his favorite surface, at most of the U.S. events where he chooses to play. Just two are played on other surfaces: Houston, on clay; and Newport, R.I., on grass.These factors alone don’t explain Isner’s U.S. success, though. I pulled his career match record and ran a logistic regression, controlling for surface,3Isner has played 32 matches on grass, 66 matches on clay and 256 matches on hard courts. I separately ran the regression with each surface and also combining hard and grass, since so few matches are played on grass. The results were essentially the same. the ranking of his opponent4Technically I used the logarithm of his opponent’s ranking, since there is a much wider gap between the No. 1 and No. 10 players in the world — and therefore the probability of beating each one — than there is between the No. 10 and No. 100 players. and the value of each match, in ranking points.5The goal was to check whether Isner plays better in higher-leverage matches, those that count for more — i.e. matches in big tournaments, or later rounds of smaller ones. If he does, this effect could be confused with a preference for home courts. That’s because many of his U.S. events have weak fields, pitting Isner against early-round opponents whom he’d likely beat anywhere. That gives him more high-stakes home matches, so if he thrives in high-stakes matches, it might help explain his home advantage.To calculate the leverage of each match, I took the number of ranking points Isner would receive if he lost the match and subtracted it from the number he would get if he won, then lost the subsequent match. The result is roughly the value of the match, as prize money rises with ranking points and the points also determine a player’s subsequent seedings and affect his earning potential. The calculation is complicated by the ATP’s change in ranking points in 2009, so it isn’t exact, but since most of Isner’s tour-level matches came after 2008, the effect is small. Even after controlling for these factors, Isner remains a homecoming king. Surface, it turns out, isn’t a statistically significant driver of his success. Nor is the value of winning the match. His opponent’s ranking is highly significant. But independent of these factors, a 50-50 match for Isner away from home becomes a match he’ll win two out of three times in the U.S.Tennis isn’t usually associated with strong home-court effects, because of its individual and international nature. Many events draw fans from across the globe, who cheer for players from countries other than their own. And most players get few chances to play at home outside of the Davis Cup, the partisan international team competition that provides a rare home-court advantage in tennis. A popular explanation for home advantage in many other sports — that officials are influenced by partisan crowds — doesn’t translate to tennis because electronic line-call review at the sport’s top levels has greatly reduced the potential influence of subjective calls on match outcomes.Perhaps Isner thrives so much at home because of his background in college tennis, a level of competition where the team is primary. Isner starred at the University of Georgia and loves college team sports, spending much of a press conference last Saturday in Miami breaking down his NCAA men’s basketball tournament bracket. Isner counts on support from American crowds, and was taken aback by U.S. Open fans’ cheers for his opponent, Frenchman Gael Monfils, last summer.Isner lamented his inconsistency away from home in that Indian Wells press conference, and he’d naturally rather do as well outside the U.S. as he does in it. But if he had to choose between his unbalanced current record and, say, maintaining the same win probability everywhere, he should opt for the status quo. Ranking points and prize money nearly double at each stage of a tournament, rewarding players who alternate finals with first-round exits over players who consistently lose in the second round.6We can illustrate this by imagining a simplified five-tournament sequence in which each tournament has 32 players and five rounds. Points and prize money double each round, from one point and $1 for a first-round exit up to 32 points and $32 for a title.Player A, with one title and four first-round losses, would pick up 32 points and $32 for the title, and an additional four points and $4 for the other four tournaments, for a total haul of 36 points and $36. His record would be 5-4.Player B, with five quarterfinal exits, would get four points and $4 in each tournament, for a total of 20 points and $20 — barely half the yield of Player A, despite a superior win-loss record of 10-5.So inconsistency in tennis is good. Even better is predictable inconsistency. A player who doesn’t know when he’ll thrive can’t plan around it. Someone who does best at clay-court events can schedule as many as he can fit in. A player who plays best at home ought to schedule as many home tournaments as possible. Isner has learned that lesson. He has reaped the benefits of a tournament calendar that still features a significant number of U.S. events, even as players from other countries have ascended in the rankings.In addition to the U.S. Open and the mandatory events in Indian Wells, Miami and Cincinnati, Isner had 10 ATP events in the U.S. to choose from in 2007 and 2008, his first two years on tour. That number declined to nine, then eight and then, this year, seven. But the decline in American men’s talent has been even steeper during that time, making ranking points at those events low-hanging fruit for Isner. Combine the easy fields with his home-court preference, and Isner finds lots of success in places such as Atlanta, Winston Salem, N.C., and Houston — even as events he played earlier in his career in Indianapolis, Las Vegas, San Jose, Calif., and New Haven, Conn., have vanished.Early in his career, Isner didn’t choose so well for himself. In his first two years on tour, he opted to play just three of his 10 non-mandatory events in the U.S. But from 2009 to 2013, he managed to play 29 of his 53 optional events in the U.S., even though only one-fifth of such events took place there. Last year, the U.S. hosted eight of these events, and Isner played in seven. He reached the semifinals of six and the finals of three, winning twice.Isner has taken advantage of his home-court preference more wisely than his peer and frequent doubles partner, Sam Querrey. I ran the same analysis on Querrey, the second-ranked American man today. For Querrey, too, surface and leverage weren’t significant. He also showed a significant home-court advantage, though the effect was smaller and less significant than for Isner.7A 50-50 match away from the U.S. for Querrey would turn into a match he’d win 62 percent of the time at home. Yet after playing almost exclusively at home in his rookie year on tour, Querrey has opted to play events away from the U.S. almost as often as home tournaments, averaging one more optional road trip per year than Isner.Perhaps many players would show a strong, significant home advantage if they had the chance. None of the world’s top five players gets more than two or three home events each year. Players from the other Grand Slam-hosting countries — the U.K., France and Australia — have a few more opportunities. But those countries combined have about the same number of tournaments as the U.S.Tennis’s general move away from the U.S., and Isner’s impending 29th birthday, might keep him from entering as many home events in the future. He’s compensating by making more of his opportunities and stepping up at the bigger U.S. events, such as this month’s strong runs and his finals in Cincinnati last year and in Indian Wells the year before that. If Isner can keep improving at the big U.S. events, he won’t have to worry about getting better away from home. read more

Can Alabama Afford To Lose

Last Saturday, the Mississippi State Bulldogs — ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll, the Coaches Poll and the College Football Playoff committee’s rankings — lost to the Alabama Crimson Tide 25-20. The loss ruined the Bulldogs’ quest for their first undefeated season since 1940, when they went 10-0-1.But under college football’s new playoff system, which will select four teams to contend for the national championship, a late-season loss by a No. 1 team isn’t as devastating as in years past. Mississippi State, for instance, fell only to No. 4 in the committee’s rankings after it lost to Alabama.It’s less clear whether the Bulldogs control their own destiny. They’ll have another chance to impress the committee when they travel to Oxford, Miss., on Nov. 29 to play No. 8 ranked Mississippi. But they probably won’t play in the SEC Championship and could be leapfrogged by a team (such as Baylor or TCU from the Big 12) that runs the table.The permutations can get intense. To forecast a team’s likelihood of making the playoff, you not only have to account for all plausible outcomes of upcoming football games but also how the set of humans who make up the selection committee might react to those different outcomes. We’re in the midst of investigating these questions and will have some results for you soon.But we’ll start, in this article, with a simple cut of the data: What’s happened, historically, to the ranking of No. 1 teams like Mississippi State when they lose? Could Alabama, the new No. 1, remain in the top four if it loses one of its remaining games?Because the playoff committee is new, we’ll be looking at the historical results from the Coaches Poll for guidance. (We figure the Coaches Poll might be a better proxy for the playoff committee than the AP poll since the committee leans heavily on athletic directors and former coaches.) Here are all the teams since 2002 to have lost a game while ranked No. 1 in the Coaches Poll:No. 1s that lost a regular-season game wound up anywhere from No. 4 to No. 10 after their defeats. That shouldn’t give much comfort to Alabama. Mississippi State’s case was unusual; most regular-season losses knock a No. 1 team out of the top four.What accounts for the different outcomes? Well, it’s complicated. The humans voting in the polls are a little forgiving if the loss comes against another ranked opponent. (No. 1s that lost to a ranked opponent fell to No. 6 on average, versus No. 8 for those that lost to unranked teams.) The margin of defeat may matter some as well. The No. 1s that lost regular-season games by the largest margin — Alabama and Ohio State on consecutive weekends in 2010 — fell to No. 8 and No. 10, respectively.Another factor is whether the year features a deep field of contenders. Part of Ohio State’s steep drop in 2010 may have been because there were an unusually high number of undefeated teams ranked just behind them at the time.Human voters have historically been more forgiving of losses in the conference championship: No. 1s to lose there have fallen to only No. 4 on average. That could be good news for Alabama. Still, this is a small sample with just three examples. Furthermore, the playoff committee claims it will put a particular emphasis on conference championship results.As I said, we’ll be making an effort to sort all this out. It will necessarily come with a lot of probabilities and approximations — this is the first year of the new system and we’re not expecting to identify hard-and-fast rules.There is one rule, however, that has almost always been true. It’s a simple one: A team can’t gain ground by losing.The chart, below, shows what happened to teams ranked throughout the top 25 in the Coaches Poll after they lost a game. (In the chart, read the vertical axis to find a team’s original ranking, then scan across to find the red line, which shows the team’s expected ranking after a loss. The dashed line represents what would happen if a team held its previous position.) Of the 1,133 ranked teams to lose since 2002, only 22 retained their original spot in the rankings. And even fewer — just five teams — improved their position in the poll.This may not be a surprising result, but it tells us something about how human voters react to college football outcomes. As I mentioned, the evidence suggests that voters pay some attention to margin of victory. A definitive win might get a little more credit than a narrow one.But what voters almost never do is reward a team because it loses by less than expected. Say, hypothetically, that No. 24 Gotham Tech travels to No. 3 Gotham State’s home stadium and loses on a last-minute field goal despite having been a 17-point underdog. Your esteem for Gotham Tech should probably improve: That’s a much better showing than you really had the right to expect. But a team’s standing in the polls has almost never improved after an outcome like this; the team has just been punished less. (In this respect, human voters seem to behave a lot like our version of NFL Elo ratings, which account for margin of victory but always prioritize a win over a loss by any margin.)Nor do teams seem to be demoted after narrower-than-expected wins. Take the non-hypothetical case of the 1995 Texas A&M Aggies. On Oct. 14 of that year, they won by just 3 points at home against the SMU Mustangs, an awful team that would go 1-10 that year. If there were ever a time to punish a team for a bad win, this was it. But the Aggies held their position at No. 22 in the polls.The next chart shows the data for ranked teams after wins since 2002. There are a few cases where a team lost ground in the Coaches Poll despite winning — but from what we can tell these were mostly cases where a team was leapfrogged by another that won in more impressive fashion. (That happened to Florida State earlier this year, for example.)There are some other interesting characteristics in these charts. After a loss, teams fall more positions in the poll if they are ranked lower to begin with. While No. 1-ranked teams fall five spots, on average, after a loss, teams ranked No. 15 fall eight positions. This may reflect the fact that teams are more closely bunched together toward the bottom of the Top 25 than toward the top, which is what you’d expect if team skill levels abided by a normal distribution.And a ranked team’s position falls more after a loss than it improves after a win. For example, when the No. 10 team wins a game, it improves only to No. 9, on average. But the same team falls to No. 17 after it loses.This is mainly a reflection of the fact that ranked teams are expected to win. A successful college football season is mostly a matter of running the gauntlet and avoiding upsets. The playoff system gives teams more slack, but not much. read more

Derek Jeter Injures Ankle Again Goes to Hospital

New York Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter has re-injured his left ankle and the team isn’t sure when he will return.In Saturday’s game against the Boston Red Sox, the team captain was pulled for a pinch-runner after hitting an RBI single in the sixth inning.The 39-year-old later went to a hospital for a precautionary CT scan. The Yankees office said the initial results were negative.Jeter has been out most of the season recovering from the broken left ankle he suffered in last year’s playoffs. Yankees general manager Brian Cashman says that if the team wasn’t playing to make the playoffs, he could simply take a few days off to rest.Since being back, Jeter has hit .190 in 17 games.

Lions Suh May Receive Another NFL Fine

It’s getting to the point where the NFL appears to be singling out Detroit Lions’ player Ndamukong Suh for scrutiny, as the defensive tackle is facing yet another potential fine.The NFL is currently reviewing Suh’s play against the Cleveland Browns in Sunday’s game. Suh appeared to lead with his helmet when he hit Browns quarterback Brandon Weeden.The hit happened after the QB let go the ball but it wasn’t penalized. After the play was shown on video posted on nfl.com Tuesday, the vice president of officiating, Dean Blandino said, “Why don’t we look at it some more?” indicating that they may change the call.Suh, who has a heap of fines on his resume, was fined $100,000 earlier in the year for an illegal block on Minnesota Vikings center John Sullivan in Week 1. He appealed the penalty, but lost last week. That payment was the largest fine in NFL history for an on-field conduct issue. read more

Serena Williams Umpire Punished Her More Harshly Than Male

Serena Williams talks with referee Brian Earley during the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williams thought she was treated more harshly by the chair umpire in the U.S. Open final than a man would have been.Williams was cited by official Carlos Ramos for three code violations during her 6-2, 6-4 loss to Naomi Osaka on Saturday: for getting coaching signals; for breaking her racket, which cost her a point; and for calling the chair umpire a thief, which cost her a game.“I’ve seen other men call other umpires several things. I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality and for all kinds of stuff. For me to say ‘thief,’ and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark. He’s never taken a game from a man because they said ‘thief,’” Williams said at her news conference.“For me, it blows my mind,” Williams said. “But I’m going to continue to fight for women.”Earlier, as Williams pleaded her case on court with tournament referee Brian Earley, calling the penalties unfair, she said: “Because you’re a woman, you’re going to take this away from me?”“There’s a lot of men out here that have said a lot of things,” Williams said, “and because they are men , that doesn’t happen.”Two-time Australian Open champion and two-time U.S. Open runner-up Victoria Azarenka backed up Williams’ stance, writing on Twitter : “If it was men’s match, this wouldn’t happen like this. It just wouldn’t”Billie Jean King, who won 12 Grand Slam singles titles and helped found the women’s tennis tour and pave the way for equal prize money in the sport, also commented via Twitter on what happened Saturday.“Several things went very wrong during” the match, King wrote. “Coaching on every point should be allowed in tennis. It isn’t, and as a result, a player was penalized for the actions of her coach. This should not happen.”In a second tweet, King said: “When a woman is emotional, she’s ‘hysterical’ and she’s penalized for it. When a man does the same, he’s ‘outspoken’ & and there are no repercussions. Thank you (Serena Williams) for calling out this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same.”There have been a series of recent happenings that illustrate the ways in which tennis does do things differently for men and women.Just before the U.S. Open, the French tennis federation president said that the black catsuit worn this year by Williams at the French Open would not be allowed at that tournament in the future. During the U.S. Open, a female player, Alize Cornet, was incorrectly admonished by a chair umpire for changing her shirt during a match, which is allowed — and which men do all the time. And the U.S. Tennis Association created a new rule last week that allows for a 10-minute break in men’s matches when the heat and humidity are too harsh; previously, only women were given that chance for a delay.“I just feel like the fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person that has emotions, and that want to express themselves, and want to be a strong woman. They’re going to be allowed to do that because of today,” Williams said. “Maybe it didn’t work out for me, but it’s going to work out for the next person.” read more

Heres An Idea Falcons Throw To Julio Jones In The Red Zone

Julio Jones is unlike most other star receivers. He doesn’t scream at his quarterback or sulk or throw a tantrum when passes don’t come his way. He’s happy to share the wealth with his teammates. In short, he’s no diva.But if any NFL wide receiver has earned the right to complain on the sidelines, it’s Jones. The Falcons star hasn’t scored a touchdown this season — and in fact has underperformed his whole career when it comes to scoring. His touchdown rate has never come close to matching his outsized production everywhere else on the field. So maybe the Falcons — who have scored just 17 points in each of their past two games (both losses) heading into their Super Bowl rematch with the Patriots on Sunday — would actually benefit from Jones flipping a Gatorade cooler or two.Since 2014, Jones has been nothing short of unstoppable. He’s been the NFL’s most productive receiver when measured by yards per game, the second best in terms of receptions per game and the third best in yards per target.1Among all wide receivers and tight ends who have averaged at least 50 yards in at least 25 games since 2014. In those three-plus seasons, he’s averaging 104.8 yards but a ho-hum 0.4 touchdowns per game, which is roughly the same as less-heralded wideouts such as Allen Hurns, Emmanuel Sanders and Jordan Matthews. For an elite receiver, Jones is solidly middle-of-the-pack in touchdown production: Last Sunday, Atlanta lost to the Dolphins in the final minute when Ryan forced a pass in double coverage to second-year tight end Austin Hooper (36 career catches) instead of giving Jones a chance to make a play. The result was a game-ending interception at the Miami 6-yard line. While Jones said nothing, head coach Dan Quinn made it clear that he wasn’t pleased with bypassing his team’s best weapon.Atlanta’s strange unwillingness to use its best receiver has now spanned three offensive coordinators. When the current one, Steve Sarkisian, was handed the keys to the offense that in 2016 led the NFL in scoring, he saw one major area where the unit could improve.“Is there a way to get Julio more touches in the red zone and finding those matchups?” Sarkisian said at the time.The answer, apparently, is “no.”Check out our latest NFL predictions. The 51 receivers on the chart above average a scoring strike every 157.1 yards. Jones averages a TD for every 262 yards he accumulates, which is the third most extreme discrepancy in the sample.2Only Vincent Jackson and Willie Snead have Jones beat here, with 343.6 and 270 yards per touchdown respectively. The Dallas Cowboys’ Dez Bryant, meanwhile, leads all receivers in fewest yards per touchdown, 92.7, but that’s probably no accident: Bryant has long made it clear that he expects a big portion of the touchdown glory — or someone, possibly everyone, is going to hear about it.Jones’s scoring woes almost defy explanation. Receivers who thirst for touchdowns are generally undersized players who do their damage between the 20s. But Jones is one of the game’s largest targets at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. He’s also one of the position’s best athletes, crushing his scouting combine in speed, jumping ability and agility. It’s tough to imagine a better receiver his size on the NFL boundaries when it comes to getting both feet down inbounds and defying gravity in the process. If an NFL quarterback were to design a perfect red-zone weapon in a lab, he would look a lot like Jones.Incredibly, Jones’s lack of scoring seems to be by design. His percentage of QB Matt Ryan’s targets drops steadily the closer Atlanta gets to the goal line: from 32.8 percent of passes when the Falcons are at least 80 yards from the end zone to just a little more than half that — 16.7 percent — when they’re in the red zone. read more

Ohio State field hockey set for Big Ten tournament quarterfinal vs Northwestern

OSU sophomore forward Maddy Humphrey (23) during a game against California on Oct. 25 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 6-3. Credit: Robert Scarpinito | Copy ChiefOhio State field hockey is set to face fourth-seeded and No. 17 Northwestern in the opening game of the Big Ten Tournament, where the winner will move on to compete against top-seeded Maryland or eighth-seeded Michigan State.Northwestern (12-7, 4-4) and OSU last met less than a month ago when they squared off at Buckeye Varsity Field in a game in which the Wildcats scored once in each half. Those two goals were enough to defeat OSU in shutout fashion, 2-0. OSU hopes to increase offensive pressure this time around, coach Anne Wilkinson said.“We can’t give up the amount of shots we’ve given up in the past,” Wilkinson said. “We haven’t generated enough attacks and been able to sustain them so we need to take more shots and challenge more of these goalkeepers.”Sophomore forward Morgan Kile said one of the main components going into the tournament is putting all of the pieces together one last time. “I think the key thing for our team going into the tournament is to put all the skills and things we’ve worked on throughout the season together,” Kile said. “We need to really show Northwestern what we can do out there.”The Buckeyes will enter the tournament with three players being awarded All-Big Ten honors. Senior co-captains Peanut Johnson and Emma Royce, along with sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey, were bestowed the awards after their efforts this season. Johnson, Humphrey, Royce and Kile have all registered double-digit points, with Johnson and Humphrey being the fourth-highest scoring duo in the Big Ten this year with 53 total points. This year will be the Buckeyes’ 20th all-time appearance in the Big Ten tournament. Thrice they have taken home the Big Ten title. In 2001 and 2010, OSU was a co-champion, while it captured the outright crown in 2006. The last time OSU and Northwestern squared off against each other in the tournament was in 2013. In that game, Johnson registered a goal and an assist, pushing the Buckeyes to a 3-2 victory against the then-No. 13 Wildcats.In order to post another win this time around, Wilkinson said teamwork will be critical.“The most important thing is we have to play together,” Wilkinson said. “Sometimes they take too much on themselves and put too much weight on their individual ability. We just need to rely on each other and play as a team, and the results will take care of themselves. We have to work hard, which they have.”OSU and Northwestern are set face off at 10 a.m. on Thursday in Bloomington, Indiana. Defensive gainsOSU has given up 18 fewer goals this year — 56 last season compared to 38 in 2015 — as well as allowing 21 fewer shots (280 in 2014, 259 in 2015) and 10 fewer penalty corners (124 in 2014, 114 in 2015). Sophomore goalie Liz Tamburro finished the season with 124 total saves. She ranks second in the conference with 6.88 saves per game.Game results when OSU…Scores first: 7-0Leads at the half: 5-0Trails at the half: 2-9Is tied at the half: 2-0Outshoots its opponent: 4-3Is outshot: 5-6Is in a one-goal game: 4-2Is in a two-goal game: 5-7Heads to overtime: 1-1 read more

Five takeaways from Bowling Green Samuel shines defense stands tall

The Ohio State football team prepares to run onto the field prior to the first game of the 2016 season against Bowling Green on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAfter a 77-10 rout of the Bowling Green Falcons on Saturday, the Ohio State football team appears to be ready for the challenges ahead in 2016. Here are five takeaways from the game.Samuel the workhorse for OSUEarlier in the spring, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer named junior H-back Curtis Samuel as his No. 1 playmaker. Known for his speed and agility, Buckeye fans got a glimpse Saturday as to why Meyer had faith in Samuel. Touching the ball 22 times, the junior picked up 261 all-purpose yards and three total touchdowns. Although the day was a chance to see how redshirt sophomore Noah Brown and redshirt senior Corey Smith would perform at wide receiver after season-ending injuries last season, Samuel was the leading pass catcher on Saturday.Redshirt freshman Mike Weber was the leading rusher on the day, receiving 19 carries. Samuel was the second leading rusher on the day, handling the ball on the ground 13 times. Weber will be facing stiff competition with Samuel playing at such a high level.“It’s a great feeling to be one of the first people out there to touch the ball. I have to keep my mind right,” Samuel said. “I just want to ball out and make opportunities for my team.”One thing is certain after OSU faced Bowling Green; Samuel really is a playmaker. The Silver Bullets are fast and have depthRedshirt junior defensive tackle Tracy Sprinkle sustained what appeared to be a serious right knee injury in the first quarter. OSU fans’ worst fears were confirmed by Meyer at the press conference following the game, as it was announced that the early indication is a patellar tendon injury, most likely requiring surgery. “Tracy’s been my roommate since we first got here. Me and Tracy, we were real close during recruiting,” junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said. “I love Tracy to death. That’s my brother. When he went down, it was the worst thing. He’s family to me.”Although the loss of Sprinkle might hurt in the long run, the Buckeyes regrouped quickly and had little drop off without their primary defensive tackle on the field. Much of the reason for the success can be credited to the depth Meyer and the rest of the OSU coaching staff has talked about all spring.As for the speed of the defense, the ability of Buckeye defenders to chase down ball carriers and undercut routes to prevent receptions was showcased throughout all four characters. On two occasions, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker used his speed to track down the ball and come up with an interception.“Greg Schiano, who has coached at the highest level in football in the pros, and his comments to me about the things Malik can do,” Meyer said. “He can do whatever he trains to do.”Holes filled up quickly by linebackers and secondary defenders, preventing long carries by Bowling Green. Although a few players showcased potential weakness in coverage and pass rushing, the speed of OSU’s defense quickly made up for the miscues. The Buckeyes’ coaching staff definitely were right in saying this team is faster than last year’s. The secondary can depend on more than Gareon ConleyAlthough the only returning starter for the OSU secondary was redshirt junior Gareon Conley, the Buckeyes looked sharp throughout the afternoon. Bowling Green struggled to create any offense through the air, and Hooker came up with two big interceptions. True freshman cornerback Rodjay Burns took full advantage of his time on the field, picking off Bowling Green backup quarterback James Morgan and returning the ball 75 yards for a touchdown. The Buckeyes surrendered just 175 yards through the air.“We have a lot of talent,” junior cornerback Damon Webb said. “We’re just trying to get guys as much experience as we can and get guys on the field because we have a lot of talent, and we want to show it.”The longest pass the Falcons could muster all day was 17 yards, a testament to the swarming secondary play OSU enjoyed. They may not have the likes of Eli Apple, Tyvis Powell or Vonn Bell. But the Scarlet and Gray may just have a dominant group of cornerbacks and safeties for 2016. J.T. Barrett has maturedWhen redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett first appeared for the Buckeyes in 2014 to replace the injured Braxton Miller, Barrett helped lead the team to the College Football Playoff. Although the offense succeeded under the then-freshman, the workload of former running back Ezekiel Elliott was thought to have carried the team through most of the season. Barrett was considered immature as a player and needed time to develop. The game against Bowling Green Saturday is a testament to just how far he has come as a player. Misreading a route early in the first quarter, Barrett gave up a pick-six to Falcons linebacker Brandon Harris.“Throwing an interception for a touchdown we don’t like that,” Meyer said. “But rebound, let’s go, and he went right back and said that’s on me.”Barrett went on to complete 21 passes on 31 attempts and toss six touchdowns on 349 yards, adding another score on the ground. The seven touchdowns he was responsible for set a new record for OSU. All of this was accomplished with more than six minutes left in the third quarter.After finishing fifth in Heisman voting in 2014, Barrett makes for a compelling player who just may find himself on voters ballots this year if he can continue with this kind of production. Mike Weber has the potential to succeed at OSUAfter the recruiting saga that went with Weber, the debut of the Detroit native was delayed after a meniscus tear in his knee resulted in a redshirt season in his freshman campaign. In the spring of 2016, Weber had many expectations to meet from his coaches, and that’s exactly what he did.OSU running backs coach Tony Alford called Weber’s parents on Wednesday to share the news that their son was going to be the starting running back for the Scarlet and Gray.In his first game as a Buckeye, Weber rushed for 136 yards on 19 carries. Although he failed to score, Weber showcased a punishing running style, especially on his first carry. After being tripped a few yards from the line of scrimmage, Weber barreled into the defender in front of him, flattening the would-be tackler. The crowd erupted in cheers.Meyer spoke highly of his tailback, but extended the challenge to Weber of running a bit more like departed Ezekiel Elliott. Lofty standards for a guy appearing in his first game, but a good showing for the redshirt freshman nonetheless. read more

Ohio State field hockey loses 2nd straight game

Sophomore forward Brooke Hiltz (6) marks an opposing player during a game against Penn State on Sept. 28 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU lost, 4-3.Credit: Grant Miller / Copy chiefBehind two goals from senior forward Jenna Chrismer, Penn State field hockey outlasted Ohio State, 4-3, Sunday afternoon at Buckeye Varsity Field.OSU senior co-captain and midfielder Kaitlyn Wagner made the game interesting late when she converted on a penalty stroke with 7:50 left to play in regulation to cut Penn State’s lead to one.The Buckeyes (3-6, 0-2) couldn’t climb the ladder, however, and were unable to break through in the game’s final minutes.Freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey created the penalty stroke after she dribbled down the field and was tackled inside the scoring circle. She subsequently had to leave the game due to a right leg injury, but returned with less than four minutes to play.OSU had one final gasp when junior back and co-captain Emma Royce fired on goal off a penalty corner with a little more than five minutes left, but redshirt-senior goalie Kylie Licata made a diving stop to preserve the game for Penn State (8-2, 2-1).Despite the valiant effort toward the finish, OSU coach Anne Wilkinson said Sunday the game was lost in the opening minutes against the two-time defending Big Ten champions.“We could have (done) a lot better job in the first 15-20 minutes of setting the tone and playing strong defense,” Wilkinson said. “We need to be able to take charge in the (defending) circle.”Royce said the team’s mindset must change in order to dictate the pace from the start of each game.“I think the best way we can stay focused for the first 15 (minutes) is instead of ball watching, focusing on our tempo and keeping possession of the ball,” she said. “The reason why we get turned over in our back third in the early 15 is because we give away the ball too easily. So it’s more attention to detail, which I think is the key.”It took Penn State just 2:41 to get on the board when Chrismer scored off an assist from senior forward Taylor Herold from three yards out.Less than eight minutes later, with the score 2-1, Chrismer connected again off a pass from sophomore midfielder Carly Celkos.“I think we need to mentally prepare beforehand, have good warm-ups,” OSU junior forward Peanut Johnson said. “It starts there because I think it’s taking us a little bit of time to be on our game, which can’t happen.”In the second half, OSU struggled with Penn State’s size and the pressure they put on the ball. The Buckeyes found it hard to get into scoring position, recording five shots in the second period.Penn State had a 4-2 advantage in penalty corners in the second half. Penn State sophomore back Emilee Ehret converted off one a little more than 10 minutes into the frame with assists from Herold and senior forward Laura Gebhart. And Ehret’s goal proved to be the difference maker in the end.Herold’s three assists Sunday put her one point away from 100 in her Penn State career.The Buckeyes are set to go on the road for three consecutive games to start October against Maryland, Virginia and Rutgers. OSU is set to face Maryland on Friday in College Park, Md., at 3:30 p.m. read more

Chris May sparks Ohio State mens lacrosse from the faceoff X

Senior midfielder Chris May (left) is widely considered the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterWhile snow continues to fall as March begins on Ohio State’s campus, in the lacrosse world, all signs point to May.Chris May, that is, who is now the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.The Buckeyes fell just short of a win against Marquette on Sunday, losing 10-9, and while the team went 1-1 on the weekend in Louisville, Ky., May went 32 of 39 on the weekend in faceoffs, earning the Big Ten Specialist of the Week for the third time this season. And though he is more successful than ever, the graduate transfer has a “pretty crazy story” about his journey from Georgetown University to his first season with OSU.“My senior year, I was only in pads for a few practices,” he said. “I was coming off a shoulder injury when I tore my Achilles tendon … Once I got hurt, I started focusing on my future and graduate school. I’ve been a Buckeye fan my whole life … I realized I only had one shot to do this, so I really worked hard.”At Georgetown, he only stepped onto the field for 22 games, but now after just six with the Buckeyes, May has won 75 percent of his faceoffs and snagged 60 ground balls, thriving in a position named aptly for the precise skill set it requires.“It’s a unique position,” OSU assistant coach Jamison Koesterer said. “It’s mental, just hearing the whistle, finding a rhythm between what he hears and what he needs to execute physically … It definitely takes athleticism, but it also takes savvy, a little bit of poise and IQ to understand and anticipate where the ball might come out.”May’s success at the midfield X results not only from a consistent process, but also an unwavering support from his team, enabling him to aid the offense in taking the ball to the net.“A lot goes into it, but I just try to get a good reaction off the whistle and fight for the ball,” May said. “We’ve got a lot of great offensive players. A lot of guys who can score, but they can’t score if they don’t have the ball … But it’s a group effort, we have a great unit. It’s a great dynamic.”Although May is the new kid on the block with the Buckeyes, former high school teammate and OSU senior captain David Planning said he enjoys feeding off May’s familiar energy.“He’s such an easy guy to play with,” Planning said. “He knows what his job is. It makes it a lot easier on the offense and the defense.”With a lacrosse resume stronger than most of his younger OSU teammates, May assimilated quickly. He assumed a leadership role, but admitted his teammates teach him a few things too.“Being older than a lot of the guys, I feel like I have more experience,” May said. “I’m trying to be a role model for the younger guys, but I’m still learning a lot from the older guys too.”And while May continues to fine-tune his craft at the X, the rest of the Buckeyes look to learn from the loss at Marquette, revisiting the drawing board but “hungry” to return to the field.“We’re getting back to the basics on both sides of the ball,” coach Nick Myers said. “There’s always a desire coming off a loss wanting to look at what went wrong and how to fix it. Tuesday, we practiced in the pouring rain for two hours and these guys didn’t blink an eye … It’s a long wait till Saturday whenever you lose, so they’re excited.”The Buckeyes stand at the threshold of an uphill climb, facing three top 20 opponents before heading into conference play, but Planning said the team isn’t focusing on the opposition.“Our focus is on us,” Planning said. “We want to dictate the tempo and the style of play, and that starts with us.”With that goal in mind, Planning, May and the rest of the Buckeyes are set to move to Ohio Stadium on March 7 to take on Hofstra at 1 p.m. read more

Mens basketball Ohio State coach Chris Holtmann making difficult nonconference schedule priority

Ohio State coach Chris Holtmann leading a team practice on Oct. 4, 2017 at the Schottenstein Center. Credit: Jacob Myers | Managing Editor for ContentOhio State men’s basketball head coach Chris Holtmann promised during his opening press conference in June that a “really challenging” nonconference schedule was a priority.Tuesday, his influence on the Buckeyes’ future schedules was first seen with the scheduling of a season-opening home-and-home with highly regarded program Cincinnati in 2018 and 2019. That’s just the first example of what he and the coaching staff intend to do with future nonconference slates, Holtmann said Wednesday.“Our schedule is tied into some future series,” Holtmann said. “I would like to play in some of these events that happen, some of these tournaments. Whether it’s Maui, Battle for Atlantis, whatever, I would like to do that.”In the past few seasons with former head coach Thad Matta, Ohio State had one or two games scheduled nonconference against ranked teams per year. At Butler under Holtmann, the Bulldogs were often in early-season tournaments and played in the Crossroads Classic with a game against either Indiana, Purdue or Notre Dame in Indianapolis.In 2016-17, Ohio State had the 290th most difficult nonconference schedule while Butler ranked 40th, according to Ken Pomeroy’s advanced statistical ratings. Holtmann’s Bulldogs played in the Puerto Rico Tip-Off in 2015 and the Las Vegas Invitational in 2016 against high-major teams Miami (Fla.), Vanderbilt and Arizona, all of which made the NCAA Tournament last season.Calls for a tougher nonconference schedule have been prominent from the Ohio State fan base, especially for games against quality in-state programs Cincinnati, Xavier and Dayton. Holtmann said at first he wasn’t aware of the hankering from fans to see those games scheduled. The first scheduled series with Cincinnati since 1919 and 1920 is a step in that direction.“I don’t know if I really understood that until I had spent maybe a few weeks, a couple months, here,” he said. “This game met all the requirements to be a really high-level game and the excitement [from fans] was certainly a big part of that.”As much as Holtmann wants to be involved in nonconference destination tournament fields with top-ranked teams, he’s limited with Ohio State’s one-game obligation to the Big Ten/ACC Challenge, the CBS Sports Classic, the Big Ten-Big East agreement for the annual Gavitt Tipoff Games, and the possibility of the Big Ten expanding conference seasons from 18 to 20 games.“It’s a puzzle we’re trying to put together here based on what I would like to do and what is reality,” he said.Matta’s schedules don’t require a massive overhaul, Holtmann said, but there are changes he wants to make based on his philosophy. That philosophy could include packed schedules with several blue-blood programs, including at least one or two marquee home games in November or December per season, before a demanding Big Ten slate.“The argument that you don’t have to play [in-state teams] because you’re the state university, that doesn’t resonate with me as much because, again, the quality of the program and the energy around the game, and the fact that it could be a really good RPI game,” he said. “I think if you can do that, your fans, it’ll excite your fan base.”The Buckeyes are reportedly scheduled to play Xavier in a closed-door scrimmage this month, which Holtmann said was originally scheduled by Matta. Holtmann has a relationship with Xavier coach Chris Mack and said he would be open to scheduling the Musketeers if the two do not meet in the Gavitt Tipoff Games.“We get a dose of reality and honesty in those settings,” Holtmann said. “And why not do it against a high-caliber team?” read more

Baseball Ohio State faces hothitting coldpitching Xavier

Ohio State senior utility player Brady Cherry (1) swings at a ball during the game against Michigan on April 12. Ohio State won 10-5. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorThe Ohio State baseball team will aim to end an up-and-down homestretch on a positive note.Tuesday will mark Ohio State’s ninth home game in its past 10 games, and the Buckeyes (20-17, 4-5 Big Ten) have only won three of their eight games at Bill Davis Stadium over this stretch. A battle-tested Xavier (14-22, 5-1 Big East) squad will travel to Columbus for a bout with the Buckeyes. After a five-game skid that included a sweep by Northwestern at home, Ohio State has righted the ship, to an extent. The Buckeyes have taken four of their past five games, including a big series win over rival Michigan. Despite their record, the Musketeers have experience that could prove invaluable. Xavier has played No. 8 Louisville, No. 16 Arizona State and No. 17 North Carolina, going 1-6 in those matchups. Xavier has shown the potential to play with top-flight teams. The Musketeers played a three-game series at then-No. 13 Texas where the run differential was only three.In terms of Xavier’s offensive lineup, no single player sticks out; the strength is in the team’s balance. Five Musketeers are hitting within the range of .286 to .301. Junior infielder and pitcher Conor Grammes leads the team with a .301 average. Grammes has started on the mound nine times to earn a 5.53 ERA. Redshirt senior outfielder Jake Shepski has a team-high 24 RBI, while hitting .292 on the season. Behind a team batting average of .265, the Musketeers have scored an average of 5.36 runs a game.On the mound, Xavier has struggled mightily. With a team ERA of 6.71, the Musketeers only have two pitchers with an ERA below 5.50. The pitching staff is prone to allowing the long ball, allowing 47 home runs this season. This could prove advantageous for an Ohio State team that has hit 34 home runs this season. Senior Sam Czabala leads the team with a 1.19 ERA and .147 opponent batting average. The left-hander has pitched 22.2 innings in 12 appearances.The other pitcher with a sub-5.50 ERA is freshman Lane Flamm, who has a 3.55 ERA and a team-high four saves in 16 appearances. Ohio State will host Xavier at 6:35 p.m. Tuesday. read more

Princess Eugenie to rent threebed cottage at Kensington palace

first_imgPrincess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie (left) currently live togetherCredit:Yui Mok The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge meet with Barack Obama in their Kensington Palace apartments Her spokesperson said: “It is categorically not true.”The Daily Mail source added: “‘What can be said with all certainty is that Jack will not be moving in with her and nor are they planning to get married. He is a lovely young man and there is little doubt that they will settle down together some day.”The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge moved into Kensington Palace’s Nottingham Cottage following their 2011 wedding and have since moved into a suite of rooms once occupied by Princess Margaret.Buckingham Palace has been contacted for a comment.   Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Princess Eugenie is moving into a rented three-bedroom cottage in the grounds of Kensington Palace, it has been reported.Kensington Palace, in West London, is already home to the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and Prince Harry.Currently, the 26-year-old lives in a four-bedroom, taxpayer-funded apartment in St James’s Palace with her sister Princess Beatrice.But reports suggest she will move into three-bedroom Ivy Cottage in Kensington Palace next year.center_img The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge meet with Barack Obama in their Kensington Palace apartmentsCredit:Kensington Palace/Pete Souza/Whi Princess Beatrice and Princess Eugenie (left) in a carriage  A source for the Daily Mail said Eugenie would now be paying “market rent” at her new accommodation and was unable to confirm whether public money would be spent on the Kensington Palace cottage.The source told the Mail: “The matter is still under discussion, but it is likely that she will take over the property in the next few months.”The news comes as her mother, the Duchess of York, firmly denied rumours the princess was planning to get engaged to her boyfriend of six years, James Brooksbank.last_img read more

Great British Bake Off winner Candice Brown quits PE teaching to devote

first_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “It’s been completely insane and the whole feeling is overwhelming,” she said. “I was at The Cake and Bake Show in Manchester last weekend and it really was a ‘stop and wow’ moment.”People are so lovely and I love it but, at the same time, sometimes it can really take me by surprise. Every so often, I get hit with this wave of overwhelming emotion and I get quite emotional when I think that this is really happening to me.”If it hadn’t been for the school being so supportive at the beginning and letting me go and film Bake Off, I wouldn’t be here now.”Brown said that children at her school were surprised to see her back after viewers saw her win the series in October – the last before the show moves to Channel 4 – because they thought that she was now a millionaire.”They asked me why I was back after the final as I was now a millionaire. I explained to them that I hadn’t won a million but, in fact, a cake stand!”Leaving on Friday was emotional but I am excited about the future now, scared, too, and I am a bit of a worrier. But I cannot thank everybody enough for giving me this amazing opportunity and for my school letting me grab it with both hands and running with it.”I am a very lucky person.” Brown added: “It was so incredibly lovely of him to say this.”She said that it was very emotional saying a fond farewell to her pupils and fellow staff at the end of last week.”I will miss them so much,” she said. “I work in special needs and you are fighting the children’s corner so much. But I have had long conversations with my parents and my boyfriend, Liam, and I know it is the right decision.”I can’t thank the school enough, especially my head of department, Elly, who has been amazing, and I feel so grateful for the fact they have been so supportive. I keep thanking them all the time! It’s such a great new chapter for me.”She plans to take her time to map her future but Brown, who has signed up with a team of TV agents, says that she keeps pinching herself since winning the BBC1 show. “At first, I kept telling the school I would stay until December but they were so incredible and told me I had to grab everything whilst I could.”Brown said her school suggested she leave now, rather than at the end of this year, and that doing so would inspire the school’s pupils to follow their dreams.The Bake Off winner said: “My headteacher told me: ‘You’ve got to do this, you can’t do it half-heartedly. I wouldn’t forgive myself if you missed out.”It’s not that we don’t want you here but you have to give it 100%. If we can’t encourage our staff to follow their dreams and inspire, then we are not doing our job properly. You are showing the kids that anything is possible.”‘ Credit:Ken McKay /ITV / Rex / Shutterstock Candice Browncenter_img Candice Brown triumphed in this year’s final Credit:Mark Bourdillon/BBC / Love Productions Brown said she had discovered over the past few weeks that trying to juggle her day job – which involves working with children with special needs – with new commitments was too difficult.But Brown, who also teaches PE, said she could not have made the jump had it not been for the support of staff at Ashlyns School in Berkhamsted, Hertfordshire. Her last day at the secondary school was on Friday.She said: “This has been such an agonising decision to make. Never in a million years did I ever go into the show thinking this would happen. That is why I have been back at school teaching since I won the final. “I have been teaching for about eight years now and I love it. But since winning the final, I have also been completely bowled over by the amazing opportunities that I have been offered. Candice Brown winning Bake Off The winner of The Great British Bake Off Candice Brown has quit her job as a PE teacher to pursue the “amazing opportunities” she has been offered since the series.The 31-year-old, who beat Jane Beedle and Andrew Smyth in the final, shocked pupils when she returned to her post.But she has now made the “agonising” decision to put her job as a teacher on hold to pursue a career in baking.last_img read more

Fullfrontal nudes pornographic videos and bondage equipment The Xrated exhibition to celebrate

first_imgAn installation titled We Are Hull is projected onto the city's Maritime Museum, forming part of the Made in Hull series The collective later performed under the name Throbbing Gristle, pictured performing in California in 1981 The work was originally exhibited by the notorious art collective at the London Institute of Contemporary Arts in 1976.Back then, it also included rusty knives, used syringes and sanitary towels, and bloodied hair, while prostitutes were asked to walk around the gallery and mingle with guests.The collective’s members, including Cosey Fanni Tutti – who features in many of the pornographic pictures – and Genesis P-Orridge, claimed that they were making a comment on art as a form of prostitution.But the group was denounced in the House of Commons as “wreckers of civilisation”, while MPs questioned the abuse of public money and how exactly it was allowed to go ahead.The collective, which was founded in Hull, later performed under the name Throbbing Gristle, a pioneering noise band with a repertoire that featured a song about the Moors Murderers. There are still a couple of pieces that would outrage people, but now it is what you see on social media most of the timeDavid Sinclair, Humber Street Gallery curator Hull is spending more than £30 million on a year of events and hopes to attract one million visitors.The city will also host the Turner Prize as part of the celebrations. Martin Green, chief executive of Hull 2017, said: “All those people who come will spend money here and stay, drink and shop here. So this is great, world-class culture being used as a regenerative and economic boost to the city.”The exhibition is open until March 22 at the Humber Street Gallery in Hull.   David Sinclair, the curator at the Humber Street Gallery, said the show, which took two years of planning, was a “real insight into COUM and their journey to Throbbing Gristle”.But he admitted that some pieces were still likely to cause outrage. “There are explicit content signs up and there are a couple of pieces that require parental consent, but you put it in a historical context and understand it is 40 years ago,” he said.“It would have been outrageous at the time and there are still a couple of pieces that would outrage people, but now it is what you see on social media most of the time.”center_img Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. It is one of the most controversial events in the history of British art, having been deemed so offensive it sparked a Parliamentary debate. And now, 40 years on, members of the public will be able to see exactly why COUM Transmissions’ Prostitution show caused such a stir.For a new X-rated exhibition including full-frontal nudes, pornographic video footage and bondage equipment from the original show opens on Friday in Hull in celebration of its City of Culture status. Visitors will also be able to admire an image of a couple in flagrante, a jewelled genital pouch and a “cut-up” collage of a woman masturbating. An installation titled We Are Hull is projected onto the city’s Maritime Museum, forming part of the Made in Hull seriesCredit:Danny Lawson/PA The collective later performed under the name Throbbing Gristle, pictured performing in California in 1981Credit:Michael Ochs Archives The new show, which will run until March 22, tells the wider story of their career and also includes diaries and letters from personal archives.Many of the pieces have not been on display since the 1976 show, while a larger installation of people’s recollections are also on display.Visitors have been told to “take an open mind, expect nudity, profanity and maybe a little anarchy”.  A sign outside warns that it is unsuitable for children, but there is no age limit.last_img read more

Fancy a new job The Queen is hiring

first_imgFed up of your boss? How about working for the Queen?The Royal Household is looking for someone to make cushions and curtains in Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and St James’s Palace.The successful applicant will look after 1,000 rooms in the palaces for £22,000 a year.However, to apply, experience in furnishing is required.The job is described as: “knowing your curtains add the finishing touch to the state rooms”.The advert continues: “It’s protecting heritage by leaving your own legacy. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Your extensive experience with soft furnishings and curtain projects will make you the expert we need.”Your practical skills will be outstanding, and you’ll be able to produce soft furnishing work (both machine and hand stitching) of the highest standard in terms of structure and finish.”Having a thorough understanding of conservation and significant experience of making new items, you’re able to identify, survey and accurately evaluate soft furnishings as to condition, materials and the techniques used in their manufacture.”Organised, with a structured approach to work, you can prioritise and deliver work to meet multiple and sometimes challenging deadlines.”Finally, you’ll enjoy working alongside your talented colleagues, bringing together specialist skills to deliver collaborative and spectacular results.”Applications close on April 6. “And it’s furnishing some of the most famous houses in the world. This is what makes working for the Royal Household exceptional.“Within Buckingham Palace, Windsor Castle and St. James’s Palace there are more than a thousand rooms, all containing various furniture and furnishings.“Your challenge will be to provide curtains and soft furnishings that will maintain the presentation and functionality of these unique environments.“You’ll manage and deliver multiple soft furnishing projects, designing new items, estimating materials, costs and timings, and cutting fabrics.“From tailoring furniture covers, to creating new curtains to scale the heights of state rooms, you’ll consistently aim for the highest standards.“Working with numerous historic items, you’ll survey and evaluate the condition of furnishings, prioritising work to both repair and preserve items, whilst also meeting the operational needs of working Royal residences.center_img Show more “You’ll carefully record all your handlings of historic furnishings, as well as keeping workrooms in good condition, fully equipped and stocked.“The range of projects will stretch you. And knowing that you’re conserving and creating magnificent items that will be enjoyed by future generations will give you the greatest sense of reward.last_img read more

Fundraising Manchester journalists covering terror attack sent pizza by Boston newspaper in

first_imgEditors at The Boston Globe came up with the idea the day after a suicide bomber killed 22 people and wounded dozens more at a concert at the city thousands of miles away in northern England.”We decided it would be nice to do something for the people of the Manchester Evening News,” says Emily Procknal, community relations manager at The Boston Globe. Journalists at the Boston daily were themselves the recipients of pizza sent by the Chicago Tribune in the wake of the double bombing of the Massachusetts’s city marathon in April 2013.Neither is it the first time the gesture has been repeated. Several media outlets sent pizzas to a newspaper in Orlando after a nightclub attack in June 2016, others were sent to The Baltimore Sun as journalists covered riots that swept the city in April 2015. It was a small gesture that kept a fabled Boston newspaper fed during difficult times, one they thought frazzled reporters in Manchester would appreciate too.So they sent pizzas from across the Atlantic. Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “Newsrooms in the US have kind of started doing this,” explained Procknal.The Manchester Evening News appears to have appreciated the thought from across the Pond. “Thanks friends,” tweeted the newspaper on Wednesday next to a picture of a fast emptying pizza boxes.last_img read more

Hospital turns down donation from men who wore demeaning nurse costumes

first_imgIn a letter to the Ludlow Hospital League of Friends, Ms Ditheridge and chair of the trust Mike Ridley, said: “The presentation of men dressed as female nurse sin a highly-sexualised and demeaning way is wrong, very outdated and insulting to the profession.” Peter Corfield, chairman of the League of Friends of Ludlow Hospital, described the refusal of the cash as “absolutely ridiculous.”  Nurses  A hospital has turned down a donation from a group of men who raised money by dressing up as nurses, claiming their behaviour was “highly-sexualised” and “demeaning”.The men raised £2,500 in the event in Ludlow, Shropshire, which sees them dress up as female nurses and take to the streets with collection buckets.The fundraising drive for Shropshire Community Health NHS Trust has been taking place without complaint for 30 years, raising around £90,000 in total.Jan Ditheridge, chief executive of the trust, said she is not comfortable with how the event portrays medical staff and refused the donation.  Ms Ditheridge, chief executive of the trust said: “It isn’t okay to portray healthcare professionals in this way.”We have previously asked that this doesn’t happen and therefore don’t think it’s right to accept any money associated with this activity.”I’m sure the event was organised with the best intentions and we are sorry if it’s made people feel uncomfortable or embarrassed.”Many people kindly and selflessly raise money for our organisation, and especially for our hospitals. We are eternally grateful for that.” Men dressed up as nurses The event has been running for 30 yearsCredit:Caters He added: “The event has always run with the full knowledge and support of the hospital and primary care trust management with participation by NHS staff.”The whole thing is a light-hearted fundraiser which has raised between £2,500 and £6,500 each year and so over that period of time it’s a very tidy sum. The health chiefs turned down the donationCredit:Caters  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings.last_img read more

Shopping complex evacuated as Army are called in to deal with suspicious

A shopping complex in the centre of Reading is on lockdown after the Army were called to deal with the reported discovery of a bag with wires protruding from it. Police evacuated hundreds of people from The Oracle and ordered those in nearby buildings to stay indoors and away from the windows at 9am Tuesday.Roads have been sealed off to allow an Army bomb disposal squad to investigate the suspicious package, which was reportedly found in the shopping centre toilets. The local council offices are also within the police cordon and the public were prevented for entering the building.Several hours after the discovery was made, a spokesman for Thames Valley Police said that they were continuing to treat the object as suspicious and advised workers in nearby officers to remain inside their buildings. The Oracle complex had 90 shops, a 12 screen cinema and restaurants which line the banks of the River Kennet which flows through the shopping centre.The retail unit covers two storeys of mall and includes Debenhams and House of Fraser there was multi-storey car park. Restaurants include Jamie’s Italian, Wagamama and Pizza Express. Bridge Street is currently locked down as The Oracle is evacuated. #rdguk pic.twitter.com/g55PFoJeW8— Gemma Davidson (@gemdavidson23) June 12, 2018 Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. Sources told the Reading Chronicle the bag containing wires was reported to police by a member of the public.The River Kennet runs through the centre of the Oracle Centre which is popular with shoppers from across the south of England.The police spokesman said: “Officers were called to the centre at 9am and have since cordoned off the area from the public as a precaution. “Nearby restaurants have also been evacuated as officers work to establish the nature of the item. Our officers remain at the scene at the Oracle shopping centre, Reading as we deal with a suspicious item. We’d like to thank everyone for their continued patience as we deal with the incident. pic.twitter.com/X72FCI5Snp— Thames Valley Police (@ThamesVP) June 12, 2018 “A cordon has been put around the large shopping centre, with the huge multi-storey car-park also being closed.”A spokesman for The Oracle said: “The safety of our staff and customers is our priority and we are working to support the police with their investigations.” read more