History of Vermont Printers Now Available

first_imgThe Lane Press, Inc. announced the availability of the book A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 – 2004. Published by Lane Press to recognize Vermont printers and to commemorate its 100th anniversary, the book features interviews of 20 prominent contributors to the states printing industry, a history of printing techniques, and the changing role of technology during this time. Putting ink on paper is one of the central acts of a civilized society, the book begins. For private messages, a pen will do. But for spreading public informationanything from advertising to sacred textsprinting has long been the medium that has joined the individuals in a culture.How important is printing to the Vermont economy? Today there are 119 commercial printing businesses that employ more than 3,600 people with sales of more than half a billion dollars.Authored by Chris Granstrom with oral histories by The Vermont Folklife Center and photography by Michael Sipe, the book is a compilation of stories and images that bring to life the important role printers play in the dissemination of information, our ideals, and the freedoms we enjoy as a result of the printing industry.In the preface of the book, Philip Drumheller, president of Lane Press, says that more than anything else, this is a people story. This is a story about families, fathers and sons, and a lot of great individuals, lively characters who make the story of printing in Vermont both appealing and engaging. The oral history interviews with noted printing professionals bring the printing history alive through the stories they tell.Rocky Stinehour, founder of Stinehour Press in Lunenburg, Vermont, spoke at length during his oral history interview about the role of technology in printing. Printing has always been a technologically driven business, right from the get-go. I mean, putting those scribes out of business that were making those beautiful handmade books. There were books long before printing came along, and beautiful books, and great books, but printing did something. Printing was a tool and it took pens out of the hands of the scribes and they had to start setting type. The technology may change, but the book remains.A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 2004 is available in hard and soft cover at www.lanepress.com(link is external).last_img read more

CVPS declares 23-cent per share dividend

first_imgRUTLAND, VT — (Marketwire) — 05/06/09 — On May 5, 2009, the board of directors of Central Vermont Public Service (NYSE: CV) declared a quarterly dividend of 23 cents per share on the issued and outstanding shares of common stock, $6 par value, payable Aug. 14, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business Aug. 4, 2009. The board of directors also declared dividends on the outstanding preferred stock, $100 par value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% dividend series; $1.17 per share on the 4.65% dividend series; $1.19 per share on the 4.75% dividend series; $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% dividend series; and $2.075 per share on the 8.30% dividend series, payable July 1, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business June 19, 2009.CVPS is Vermont’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 159,000 customers statewide. The company’s non-regulated subsidiary, Catamount Resources Corporation, sells and rents electric water heaters through a subsidiary, SmartEnergy Water Heating Services.last_img read more

Draker Labs move reflects growth, future expansion

first_imgDraker Labs, a provider of high performance turnkey monitoring systems for large commercial and utility-scale solar photovoltaic (PV) systems, is moving into new, larger offices on April 1, 2011. The company’s new offices will be located in the Maltex building at 431 Pine Street in Burlington, VT. The move reflects significant growth the company experienced during 2010 as well as future expansion plans.Commenting on the upcoming move, Draker CEO Charles ‘Chach’ Curtis noted that the company doubled its staff in the past 12 months and expects to do so again in the coming year. ‘The original Draker building has served us well over the past 10 years but given recent and projected growth we knew we needed more space. The new facility will more than double our current space and allow us to continue to expand as needed.’ Curtis added that, ‘We are excited to be moving into the Maltex building, a beautifully renovated historic property situated near Lake Champlain and at the center of what is fast becoming a hub for technology companies located in the Burlington area.’Draker’s new offices are being outfitted to accommodate the company’s manufacturing, operations, hardware and software development, and sales and marketing groups. Draker’s executive offices will also be located at the new facility. The company will continue to maintain a west coast operations and sales office located at 1029 H Street, Suite 301 in Sacramento, CA.Draker’s main phone and fax numbers will remain unchanged. Effective April 1, 2011, the company’s new address will be:Draker Labs431 Pine Street, Suite 114Burlington, VT 05401About Draker LaboratoriesDraker Laboratories provides highly accurate and reliable monitoring solutions that help owners and operators of commercial and utility-scale PV systems maximize the efficiency and profitability of their solar assets.  As a supplier of complete, end-to-end monitoring solutions, Draker provides turnkey systems that combine proven field instrumentation with an intuitive Web-based data management system and unmatched customer support. For more information, visit www.drakerlabs.com(link is external).(March 24, 2011 – Burlington, VT) Draker Labslast_img read more

Registration is now open for the Citizens Bank Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival August 7

first_imgTeam registration is now open for the Citizens Bank Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival. This year’s festival is Sunday, August 7th at Burlington’s Waterfront Park. Each team is comprised of 21 paddlers who race head to head in 41 foot long dragon boats over a 300 meter course. Festival organizers encourage everyone to join together with your co-workers, friends, and family and form a team. No paddling experience is necessary, it’s all for fun, friendly competition, and raising money to fund programs to help friends and neighbors living with a cancer diagnosis. Online registration is easy. Just visit www.ridethedragon.org(link is external) for complete festival information and registration details. Every team gets a free one hour practice session in July. Space is limited so organize your team right away. The festival has become one of Vermont’s most popular summer events with over 20,000 paddlers and spectators annually. It’s all about community with entertainment, food vendors, a silent auction, raffles and more. The core of Dragonheart Vermont’s mission is to give back to the community and over the last five years the Lake Champlain Dragon Boat Festival has raised over $435,000 to support critical cancer programs in Vermont. This year, Dragonheart is expanding its community mission. With the on-going support of presenting sponsor Citizens Bank and other local businesses and organizations, the festival has set a goal to raise $250,000 to launch Survivorship NOW, a new Dragonheart Vermont initiative to help bridge the gap cancer survivors face between treatment and recovery. The Network on Wellness will promote opportunities for therapeutic treatments, strengthening programs, education, and networking to better serve cancer survivors in our community. The initiative has the strong endorsement of cancer survivors, doctors, and health care institutions in our area. The need is real and Survivorship NOW promises cancer survivors a network of services that will help them live well with cancer. Linda Dyer, Dragonheart Vermont, Executive Director:‘Our Dragonheart organization is excited about putting our efforts toward helping to promote more opportunities for wellness for cancer survivors in our community. As a breast cancer survivor and supporter organization, we have seen firsthand how valuable fitness, camaraderie, and connection can be. Our hope is that all cancer survivors in our community will have the chance to get the programs needed to live each day to the fullest.’ Marni Willams, Team Captain of Paddling in Vein states:‘We are honored to take part in the LCDBF for the 6th year in a row. Many of our members have been touched one way or another by cancer and we look forward to this opportunity to pay forward the efforts that have been made on behalf of those affected.’ Visit www.ridethedragon.org(link is external) for complete details.last_img read more

Vermont treasurer cautions US debt ceiling impasse could impact state’s credit rating

first_imgWhile federal negotiations continue on raising the U.S. debt ceiling, Vermont’s State Treasurer is cautioning that the seeming impasse could negatively impact Vermont’s hard-earned Triple-A bond credit rating.                 ‘Yesterday, we learned from Moody’s Investor Services that even the highest-rated states, including Vermont, would have their ratings reviewed next week in light of the continued U.S. debt ceiling debate,’ said State Treasurer Beth Pearce. ‘However, I’m confident Vermont’s track record of fiscal responsibility will serve us well in any rating review. Vermont has the highest credit rating in New England, one of the highest ratings in the country, a strong cash position and healthy reserves.’                 Pearce said such disappointing news concerns her because the State’s high bond rating enables Vermont to borrow funds for critical infrastructure needs at very low rates and save taxpayers millions of dollars in interest payments. On July 13, Moody’s placed the U.S. government’s debt ratings on review for possible downgrade. Moody’s informed the Treasurer’s Office that it also was concerned that states would be negatively impacted by disruptions caused by the failure to raise the U.S. debt ceiling.                 State and federal governments sell bonds to investors to borrow money to make investments in areas such as public infrastructure. In Vermont, money raised by a bond sale funds a wide range of capital purposes, including State building construction and maintenance, health and public safety, and pollution control projects. The higher such bonds are rated, the more creditworthy a rating agency evaluates the bond issuer to be. Vermont bonds are rated Triple-A by Moody’s and Fitch Ratings and Double-A+ by the Standard & Poor’s Ratings Service.                 ‘The debate in Washington is a painful reminder that even though Vermont is fiscally sound and we are responsibly managing our finances through this economic downturn, we also are affected by national public policy decisions. It would be regrettable if all of the hard work and sacrifice that State government, employees and taxpayers have made to earn Vermont’s excellent ratings is put at risk due to events beyond our control,’ said Pearce.                 Vermont’s next general obligation bond sale is not scheduled until mid-October and Pearce said the State has sufficient cash balances and receipts to delay that sale even further if necessary.                 ‘We are fortunate that we can get through any short- or even medium-term bond market disruption,’ explained Pearce. ‘Many states are not in such an advantageous position. If a resolution to the debt ceiling issue is not forthcoming, debt markets will be volatile. States and municipalities with lower credit ratings may have difficulty accessing the market at affordable interest rates, if at all. I remain hopeful, however, that a resolution will take place before the deadline.’                 The Treasurer’s Office has worked closely with State officials to review rating agency concerns and to develop contingency plans. Vermont has sufficient liquid cash reserves to manage delays in receipt of federal funds, and all of its existing debt is fixed rate and long term, which protects it from both rising interest rates and ‘rollover’ risk.last_img read more