Two can’t miss webinars: Dan Heath and Guy Kawasaki!

first_imgNetwork for Good has two amazing webinars coming up – and (as usual) they are free with registration.*Nonprofit 911: How to Get More Followers on Social Media w/ Guy KawasakiThursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. EasternWhy isn’t your hashtag everywhere? When’s the best time for a Facebook status update? What does it mean when someone +1’s you on Google +? How come no one liked your picture, story, update, tweet, share, friendship, etc? You might be caught a social media slump!Tune in Thursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear tech and social media expert Guy Kawasaki lead a free presentation giving nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via the most popular social media platforms.Register here.Nonprofit 911: The Decisive Organization: Building a Culture of Better Decision-MakingMonday, March 25 at 1 p.m. EasternBest-selling Switch author Dan Heath’s done it again! Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work hits shelves next week. He’s going to stop by and pre-release the most helpful decision-making practices to the Network for Good audience via a Nonprofit 911 webinar on Monday, the 25th at 1 p.m. Eastern. Join Dan Heath as he makes it easier for your organization to make that sound decision. Bonus: Dan will be giving away a free copy of his new book to 10 lucky nonprofits on the call.Register here.*If you can’t make the date for Guy Kawasaki, sign up anyway. You will get a recording of the webinar afterward! Dan Heath’s session is live only, so we won’t be sending recordings.last_img read more

5 Ways to Use Stories to Increase Donations

first_imgThere are infinite ways to tell your nonprofit stories, but do you know which ones will lead to more donations? Check out these great tips shared in our free webinar, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 2. Share stories on your blog.Blogging is a great way to grow your online presence, establish credibility, and increase your reach. You can highlight specific constituents, volunteers, staff, and board members—you can even let them write their own stories. Tying your blog to your website makes these testimonials, updates on upcoming events, and ongoing campaigns easy for visitors to access without receiving direct communication from you. 4. Turn donors into advocates with nurturing emails.Nurturing emails are a great way to consistently share your stories. Send welcome emails after a friend signs up for your blog, or deliver a series of emails to build anticipation once a guest signs up for an event. The goal is to familiarize people with your organization, explain how you’re being successful, describe what you want to accomplish, and share stories of successful fundraisers. Make what you’re doing human and relatable to inspire people to fundraise and advocate for your cause. 5. Revamp your annual report.After your annual report is published, do you know how many people are actually reading it? Chances are it’s not many! Because your annual report contains the proof, data, and impact of your mission, you should do everything possible to make people want to read it. Make it beautiful (forget endless columns of small black text), shareable (does it include great pictures and Twitter icons?), visual (do you have infographics and appealing charts to make your content easy to digest?), and accessible (is it easy to understand, and does it fit on your website?). Making your annual report more creative will encourage people to read it, share it, and donate in support of it!Want to learn more about how telling your stories can lead to better donor involvement and more money? Download the on-demand webinar presentation, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 3. Tie donor actions to numbers.This might not sound like a story, but trust us, it is! Close the loop for your supporters by letting them know exactly what their donation will give someone else. Will it mean two pairs of shoes, a warm meal, an immunization? Donors love to know where their money is going and what impact they’re making on someone’s life. Including a visual makes the story of a donation more compelling to a potential donor. Many organizations are hesitant to make a video; it can be expensive, time consuming, and technical. But it can also be easy and inspiring. Connect with your viewers by telling them an easy-to-follow short story that centers on just one or two people. Focus on the quality of the story and engaging your viewer, not on making a super-high-quality video. Your supporters know you’re not Hollywood, so your video doesn’t need to be as technically savvy. 1. Tell personal stories through video. last_img read more

Fundraising Benchmarks, Donor Data, and You: A Q&A with Heather Yandow

first_imgI’m a big fan of Heather Yandow from Third Space Studio. Heather produces a labor of love for small and mighty nonprofits: The Individual Donor Benchmark Report (IDBR). The IDBR highlights fundraising data trends for nonprofit organizations with annual budgets under $2 million. If you’d like to share your organization’s data for the next IDBR,  please visit Heather’s website for more info.Keep reading this post to discover why the IDBR’s data is so valuable and to collect a few nuggets of wisdom from Heather about donor data.What is the IDBR and why should organizations care about the findings?Heather Yandow (HY): The Individual Donor Benchmark Report digs into the fundraising data of small and mighty nonprofits, those with annual budgets under $2 million.It’s a best practice that nonprofits need to set goals, track outcomes, and learn from past performance. But collecting and analyzing data in a vacuum only gives part of the picture. Organizations also need to the ability to measure the impact of their fundraising and compare it other organizations like theirs, as well as to the larger sector. That’s why we created the Individual Donor Benchmark Project.There is no other benchmarking resource for smaller organizations with individual donor fundraising programs.  Simply put, the IDBR is a resource for nonprofits to see how they stack up. It helps answer questions like:Where is our fundraising doing well?What parts of our fundraising program might need a little more attention?What experiments could we try to improve our fundraising program? What data do you need to have in order to participate in the research?HY: We’ve tried to streamline the data organizations need to participate to only the most critical metrics. To participate, you’ll need to report numbers like:Organizational revenue and expensesTotal amount of individual donor revenue and number of donorsAmount raised online and number of online donorsYou can preview of the full set of questions on this site .We’ve also decided that none of the questions are required. So, if you are unable to answer a question or two (or five), that’s okay! Set aside one hour to dig into your data. You’d be surprised how much you can accomplish with one focused hour! And you might just get on a roll and keep going. Now, for something fun. On a scale from 1-10, how much do you love data?HY: I’m probably an eight. I do love data and spend a good bit of my time collecting data, training about data, and helping organization harness the power of data. But to be a ten, I think I’d have to be this guy. I’m not there yet! What are common challenges orgs face when trying to access the data they need and how can they overcome these challenges?HY: The most common challenge is that organizations don’t have a database that they know and love. For some, it’s hard to get data out of their system. For others, they don’t trust the data they do access.Here are four tips to help you start gathering this data:Take a look at this year’s survey questions. Print them out and identify what data you can easily find (like last year’s total income) and what might take a little more time to figure out (like retention rate). If you run into problems, know that you can skip a question or two on the survey. I know that sometimes a number just isn’t easily available, so you can just leave that question blank.From Network for Good: Don’t have a user-friendly donor database that can help you store, access, and analyze your donor data? Network for Good’s new donor management system is everything you need and nothing you don’t. Check it out now! Last year’s big finding was about how much more money organizations raised when they had a fundraising plan. Are you looking into that again this year or are you trying to determine new/different factors that contribute to fundraising success/misses?HY: Both! We are definitely digging in to our finding that a fundraising plan is the secret to individual donor success. To start, we want to get a better understanding of what a typical fundraising plan looks like. Does it include an annual development calendar? An analysis of the previous year? We’re hoping that getting more specific information will help identify the critical parts of the fundraising plan.At the same time, we will also be looking into other factors that may contribute to fundraising success, like Board participation in fundraising or the number of meetings organizations hold with donors and potential donors.If organizations want to participate in your research, what’s in it for them and how can they sign up?It’s easy to be part of the survey! Just visit http://www.thirdspacestudio.com/idbproject/ to learn more and start the survey.As a thank you for being part of the survey, you will receive:a results reports as well as the complete survey results to share with your colleagues and Boardan invitation to a special webinar just for survey participants to dig into the resultsa copy of official Individual Donor Benchmark Report and Infographica chance to win one of 50 coveted consultations with Ravela Insights, experts in donor data analytics, database strategy, and prospect identificationa chance to win one of five Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training prize packs with a subscription to the Grassroots Fundraising Journal as well as a book from the Kim Klein Fundraising Series Consider all the many ways that you might get the data you need. Your database may produce a perfect report – but it might not! You may need to take a closer look at your data by putting it into Excel. Or, you might need to look at the report from your online payment processor to find information about online gifts and monthly donations.last_img read more

The Need for Malaria Integration in Maternal and Newborn Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 11, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The release of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership’s report, “The Contribution of Malaria Control to Maternal and Newborn Health,” made yesterday, July 10th, 2014, an important day for malaria in pregnancy research and programming. Pregnancy was previously identified as a particularly vulnerable time to contract malaria for both mom and baby, but this is the first time the RBM Partnership has released a thematic report specifically dedicated to how malaria affects pregnant women and their newborns.The report was launched during the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in New York by UN health and development leaders. The purpose of the report launch was to forge new partnerships and strengthen existing ones to expand malaria services to one of the most vulnerable populations, pregnant women.An existing solution, with poor deliveryIntermittent preventative treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) have long been the standard for malaria prevention in pregnancy. In 2012, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated these standards by increasing the number of IPTp doses to four during pregnancy. This treatment, delivered during antenatal care (ANC), has existed for decades, but delivery is still poor. Although 77% of pregnant women receive at least one ANC visit in most countries, rates of IPTp and ITN use by pregnant women fall far below global and national targets.Why is malaria prevention part of maternal health?Malaria is both a direct and indirect cause of maternal mortality. Each year 10,000 pregnant women die of malaria infection. In addition, malaria is a major cause of anemia,  which  puts a woman at greater risk for post-partum hemorrhage, the number one cause of maternal death. WHO’s recommended treatment, four doses of IPTp and use of an ITN, can reduce severe maternal anemia by 38% and perinatal mortality by 27%. The treatment’s effectiveness plays a significant role in leading global progress on decreasing maternal mortality. But malaria prophylaxis saves not only women’s lives, but newborn lives as well.Protecting health before birthIPTp and use of ITNs can reduce a newborn’s risk of dying from malaria by 18% in the first 28 days of life; it also provides a 21% decrease in low birth weight, a risk factor for neonatal death. Every year, 75,000 to 200,000 infants die because of a  malaria infection during pregnancy. Also, an additional 100,000 neonatal deaths, or 11% of global neonatal mortality, are due to low birth weight resulting from Plasmodium falciparum, or malaria, infections in pregnancy.Although scale-up of IPTp and ITNs did not meet the global coverage target of 80%, malaria prevention efforts between 2009 and 2012 saved about 94,000 newborns. If global targets had been met, this number could have tripled, with 300,000 neonatal deaths prevented. In addition to preventing neonatal deaths, IPTp and ITNs can reduce miscarriages and stillbirths by 33%.Next stepsAlthough the WHO has given clear guidelines through Focused Antenatal Care (FANC), there is often fragmentation across ANC delivery platforms. Fragmentation makes it difficult to effectively deliver prophylactic malaria interventions through ANC. Solutions to this problem include integration of both funding and service-delivery for malaria, ANC, and maternal health interventions. In addition, countries must harmonize malaria control and maternal health efforts in national policies, guidelines, and funding. Malaria prevention is not just an addendum to current maternal and newborn health interventions, it ensures maternal and newborn health.  With integration we can save lives.Share this:last_img read more

Digital Fundraising and the Modern Donor

first_imgThe modern fundraising landscape has gone digital and there’s no going back. If you want to stay relevant, you need to keep up. Technology has changed the face of our daily interactions and engagement. Social media and text messaging offer instant connection. Smartphones allow you to make calls, check email, play music, download apps, and more. Fitbits track our health and fitness patterns. All of this leads to greater personalization; experiences tailored to the individual. Netflix sends “Top Suggestion” emails based on viewing history. Amazon recommends items based on recent searches. Donors are looking for similarly unique experiences from the nonprofits they support. Whether you’re new to digital fundraising or a seasoned pro, embracing the digital revolution will add value to your donor relationships and boost engagement levels. But, how to create accessibility and transparency in the digital age? The answer’s at your fingertips. Use digital tools—your website, social media, email blasts, online advertising—to engage donors. To learn more, download Fundraising in the Digital Age. Keep reading for a sneak peek into the guide.What Modern Donors WantThe modern donor wants more access to your organization. Share frequent updates about your work and the impact of their gifts. Donors are much more likely to make a second gift if they receive a personalized communication detailing the influence of their support.Digital fundraising is also a great opportunity for your nonprofit to be discovered online. Harness the power of search engine optimization (SEO) to improve your positioning in search engine results. This will allow your website to increase awareness of your mission and attract new donors.Creating a donor-centric experience puts donors at the heart of everything you do and say. Use this approach online as well as in person. Solicit your donor’s opinion, create new ways for them to connect with you, and watch their loyalty grow.Gone are the days of passive donors who write a check and disappear. Today’s donors want to be actively included in your work. Thanks to your digital toolkit and technology such as Network for Good’s donor management system, there’s no reason not to give them the experience they crave. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Newbuildings Drive Ocean Yields Earnings Up

first_imgzoom The delivery of another five newbuilding vessels during the third quarter of 2016 has pushed up the revenues of Norwegian ship-owner Ocean Yield ASA to USD 76.2 million for the period from USD 65.3 million reported in the third quarter of 2015.During the quarter the company expanded its fleet with the container vessels MSC Diane, MSC Ingy and MSC Eloane, the chemical tanker Navig8 Topaz, and the LR2 product tanker Navig8 Supreme, all of which are chartered out long-term.In addition, the car carrier Höegh Trapper and the product tanker Navig8 Steadfast contributed with full quarter earnings, as these two vessels were delivered during the second quarter of 2016.The company’s net profit after tax for the three months increased to USD 32.7 million from USD 22.7 million seen in the corresponding quarter of 2015.Total revenues for the nine-month period from January to September 2016 increased to USD 212.4 million from USD 191.1 million reported in the same period of 2016, while the net profit also grew to USD 190.8 million from USD 167.6 million for the respective periods.In September, Ocean Yield agreed to acquire two 45,000 dwt IMO II chemical carriers, built in 2013, for a consideration of USD 35 million per vessel in combination with 12-year “hell and high water” bareboat charters to Navig8 Ltd.Navig8 Group has certain options to acquire the vessels during the charter period, with the first option exercisable after five years.last_img read more

Alberta spending more but saving more Highlights from the fiscal update

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci released the third-quarter fiscal update Wednesday showing the province on track for a $9.1-billion deficit when the budget year ends March 31 — $1.4 billion lower than expected. Here are some other highlights from the update:— The province is expected to take in an extra $1.9 billion in revenue this year for a total of $46.9 billion.— Spending is going up to $55.9 billion, about $1 billion more than projected in last spring’s budget.— Crude oil royalties to bring in $883 million, almost double what was expected.— Revenue from bitumen royalties to be $2.4 billion, about $188 million less than projected.— Personal income tax revenue expected to be $10.9 billion, $322 million less than expected.— Corporate income tax to generate $3.9 billion, about $66 million less than budget.— Capital plan spending forecast to be $9.2 billion, in line with the budget.— The unemployment rate was projected at 7.6 per cent at budget, but is now pegged at 6.8 per cent.— Of the 90,000 new full-time jobs created in the last year, most are in the oil and manufacturing sectors.— Debt for capital and operating expenses is forecast to reach $41.7 billion — about 12.4 per cent of GDP — with debt servicing costs at $1.4 billion.last_img read more

Worst intersections in Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – ICBC has released their numbers for the worst intersections in Fort St. John.Data posted by ICBC is as of March 31, 2018, and includes all crash types including casualty crashes resulting in injury or fatality and property damage accidents.#100 crashes – 100 St & Hwy 97N & Turning lane#91 crashes – 100 Ave & Hwy 97N & Old Fort Road & Turning lane#76 crashes – 100 Ave & 100 St#67 crashes – 93 Ave & 96 St & 96A St#63 crashes – 108 St & 109 St & Hwy 97 N & Turning lane#60 crashes – 100 St & 93 AveTo view the crash scale; CLICK HERElast_img

Pearl of the Caucasus

first_imgAzerbaijan is a country of unmatched culture and exotic history. It hosts an array of customs, traditions and fine cuisines – a place which will satisfy expectations of the most sophisticated gastronomists – and finally, it is the country of Caucasian hospitality and amiability. Situated at the eastern side of Transcaucasia (or South Caucasus) on the shores of the Caspian Sea, Azerbaijan is the largest country of the South Caucasus. Baku is its capital and largest city. Also Read – Oman – Beauty with an addressAzerbaijan is often referred to as the ‘Land of Fire’. It is known that a majority of those residing in this territory before the Common Era were fire worshippers. Since then, the country has preserved the ancient evidence of that era: cave paintings, statues of gods and ancient temples. Two of the most vivid examples of this heritage are the temple of fire-worshippers (Ateshgah) at Surakhani near Baku and Yanardag, translated as the “burning mountain”. These lands were considered sacred for centuries and throughout history, they were worshipped by the followers of Zoroastrianism, Hinduism and Sikhism. Also Read – CANADA: A traveller’s delightHistorically a part of the Great Silk Road and situated at the crossroads of the geopolitical, economic and cultural interests of many nations and civilisations, Azerbaijan has, since ancient times, aroused the interests of great minds, scientists, travellers and historians. References to this amazing land, located on the western coast of the Caspian Sea and in the eastern part of the South Caucasus, can be found in the ancient writings of Herodotus, Strabo and Claudius Ptolemy. Azerbaijan has an amazing historical and cultural heritage with more than 7,500 natural, archeological, architectural and historical monuments. Cave drawings at Gobustan, Momine-Khatun and Garabaghlar mausoleums, the Palace of Sheki Khans, the Maiden Tower, the castles of Absheron, medieval manuscripts decorated with magnificent miniature paintings, antique rugs and works of literature, arts and sculpture – all of this is just a small part of the country’s rich and priceless heritage. Holidays are on the rise in Azerbaijan owing to its cosmopolitan culture and ease of connectivity. More importantly, Azerbaijani people are known for their warmth and hospitality; from hotel staff going above and beyond to help you locate excursions to sharing a hot meal and swapping stories. If you are looking to be pampered alongside exploring hidden gems in a secure and safe destination – Azerbaijan is the place. As Azerbaijan sits on the crossroads of Europe and Asia, this diamond in the rough appears rugged on the edges with miles of untouched natural beauty. Gabala is a perfect getaway retreat, far from the hustle and bustle of congested cities, where you can rejuvenate yourself. Waterfalls, large forests and the magnificent Caucasian mountains make Gabala an ideal place for the brave heart. You can also take part in various outdoor activities – quad biking, hiking, skating, horse rides etc. ARCHITECTURAL DELIGHTSThe buildings of Azerbaijan are a glorious mixture of styles, reflecting the cultural shifts and changing trends of hundreds of years. From minarets to mosaics, medieval to modern, every corner reveals something different and distinct. Momine Khatun Mausoleum The dramatic, semi-desert mountain landscapes of the Nahkchivan Autonomous Republic stretch from brooding Mt Aghri to the historic town of Ordubad. This stunning 25-meter high decagon of red brick and turquoise enameled tiles is the finest example of the Nakhchivan architectural tradition. Palace of the Shirvanshahs Located in Baku, The Palace of the Shirvanshahs is a 15th century palace built by the Shirvanshahs and described by UNESCO as “one of the pearls of Azerbaijan’s architecture”.The complex was built gradually, over the course of centuries. Haydar Aliyev Centre World-famous architect Zaha Hadid designed the crown jewel of Azerbaijan’s architecture in central Baku. It flows seamlessly from the plaza around it, joining the exterior and the interior to represent the inclusion of everyone in a place of shared ideas. A museum, exhibition halls and an auditorium are housed together in this single eternally flowing shape. Ganja Bottle House This astonishing two-storey house in Azerbaijan’s second city was completed in 1967 by Ibrahim Jafarov, and is made of 48,000 glass bottles of different colours and sizes – making it one of the greatest architectural marvels. Sheki Khan Palace The country’s craftsmen are famed for their shebeke – a mosaic of coloured glass set in a wooden latticework and assembled without nails or glue. The round-form shebeke of Sheki Khan Palace is unique, making it a real visual feast! Heydar Aliyev Centre This astonishing structure was also designed by Zaha Hadid, the first woman to ever receive the Pritzker award, architecture’s highest honor. It’s unique wave-like design earns the title as Central Baku’s crown jewel of architecture. The centre boasts of the incredible diversity and energy visible in Azerbaijani art. FEAST FOR THE SENSES Azerbaijan’s unique geography and location have resulted in a cuisine influenced not just by its own varied ingredients, but by the tastes of many people travelling along the Silk Road – making it full of surprising flavours and combinations! Plov A local favourite, plov is rice served with meat, fish or fruit. The saffron-flavoured rice is cooked with lots of fresh herbs, vegetables, dried fruits and more. Some cooking books offer over 40 different versions of plov. The dish is so highly regarded that there is even an International Plov Festival to celebrate this hearty meal. In every Azerbaijani holiday, whether it is the celebration of springtime (Novruz Bayram), or a special occasion such as a birthday or any other important family event, plov remains an integral part. Pakhlava Pakhlava is a festive dish made for Novruz – the traditional celebration of the coming of spring. The classic pakhlava is cut into diamonds and is sure to be relished by gourmands. Caviar and Fish Caspian fish has its own special taste and is best served with narsherab (pomegranate sauce). The most famous fish in Azerbaijan is the Beluga sturgeon. Known as one of the world’s most expensive delicacies, the Beluga sturgeon doesn’t reach its reproductive age till it is about 20 years old. Drinks There is extensive archeological information suggesting that the people inhabiting the territory of present-day Azerbaijan had developed viticulture. Some relevant artefacts related to the ancient wine production in modern Azerbaijan (as bowls, recipients etc.) have been excavated from the ruins of medieval towns and cities. Azerbaijan’s viticulturists developed many valuable varieties each of which were adapted to the soil and climate conditions in different parts of the country. The varied terrain of its fast-improving wineries across the country results in myriad of flavours and bouquets. The most famous is the Caspian Coast, Fireland Vineyards, Yarimada, Hacihetemli, Savalan, Hillside, and Agsu pomegranate wine.last_img read more

Rahul Priyankas UP rally cancelled over bad weather

first_imgSaharanpur (Uttar Radesh): Congress President Rahul Gandhi and party General Secretary Priyanka Gandhi’s rally in Saharanpur on Monday was cancelled due to bad weather. Both leaders were to address a gathering at the Gandhi Park here to seek support for Congress candidate Imran Masood, who has been fielded from the Saharanpur Lok Sabha seat. Congress office-bearers made the announcement after hours of waiting. The official reason given for the cancellation was bad weather. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The rally was scheduled to start around 11.30 a.m. Campaigning in Saharanpur constituency is being considered significant because of its 42 per cent Muslim population. The Congress has repeated its candidate Masood, who had put up a strong fight in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections but had lost. The SP-BSP-RLD coalition has fielded Bahujan Samaj Party’s Fazlur Rahman from Saharanpur, which includes five Assembly segments — Behat, Saharanpur, Saharanpur Dehat, Rampur Maniharan and Deoband. Voting will take place in Saharanpur on April 11, in the first of the seven phase polling.last_img read more

Tunisia resorts tense but tourists shrug off attacks

first_imgSOUSSE – Failed suicide bombings in Tunisian resorts sparked fear Thursday among residents concerned for their livelihood, but tourists largely brushed off the attacks as they flocked to the beach.A day after Wednesday’s attacks police, national guardsmen and soldiers descended on the coastal town of Sousse, patrolling the streets and stopping motorists to search their cars.Security forces were also deployed outside supermarkets and shopping centres as part of a formidable operation to safeguard the country’s vital tourism industry. “These controls will be round the clock from now on all over Sousse,” an officer, who declined to be named, told AFP.The heightened security is evident as one approaches El Kantaoui, a luxury resort and port for yachts, where national guardsmen are deployed at roundabouts to check vehicles.El Kantaoui is north of Sousse and only 10 kilometres (six miles) from the beach where a suicide bomber blew himself up in a botched attack before authorities foiled another suicide bombing in neighbouring Monastir.Wednesday’s attacks have fuelled fears about the future of the country’s tourism sector, still struggling from the 2011 revolution, which resulted in a 30-percent drop in revenues.Already reeling from political instability sparked by the murders this year of two prominent politicians and a rise in violence attributed to jihadists, the Islamist-led government has repeatedly insisted that tourism is safe.On Thursday tourists appeared to agree with that assessment as they jogged along the beach, took rides in horse-drawn carriages, sunbathed or practiced waters sports, enjoying the warm October weather.“Yesterday I was scared, frankly. But I think such incidents are mostly a threat to Tunisia. The weather here still attracts us, and I’m determined to finish my holiday,” Aurelie, a French tourist, said as she walked her dog.Michele, another French holidaymaker lying on the beach, was also determined to see out her holiday. “I don’t want to think too much and ruin my vacation,” she said.Waiter Billel Toumi said he could not forget Wednesday’s events that easily.“Tourism has been targeted. We have been targeted,” he said. “We are not afraid for our own lives, but we must be able to work to feed our families.”Tourism accounts for a sixth of the workforce in Tunisia, according to the head of the National Tourism Office Habib Ammar, who was promoting his country at the Berlin tourism fair in March.But Tunisia has been struggling to woo tourists put off by the political turmoil across northern Africa.Figures released by the tourism ministry in mid-October showed the hotel occupancy rate for the first nine months of 2013 was 1.4 percent less than in 2012 and 15.7 percent lower than in 2010.The head of the French travel operator Selectour Afat (AS Voyage) Jean-Pierre Mas told AFP it was too soon to say if the attacks will have consequences on tourism in Tunisia.“Yesterday’s attacks… did not have measurable consequences. There are no cancellations. We cannot yet say today if the attacks affected bookings,” said Mas.“Globally the situation in Tunisia is worrisome from the economic point of view: tourism has dropped by 30 percent since the Arab Spring, it did not take off this summer, the political instability and now the attempted attacks targeting tourist zones are not favourable to the redeployment of tourism in Tunisia.”The porter of the four-star Riadh Palms hotel, the apparent target of the first attack, agreed.“We were already living through very tense times, and since yesterday’s incident we are living in fear,” said the porter, who declined to be named.“We are scared to death.”last_img read more

Theres No Place Like Home For John Isner

John Isner became the top-ranked American male tennis player by playing his best tennis at home. He wins more than two-thirds of his matches in the U.S., but just half elsewhere. Tennis writers have portrayed Isner’s strength at home as a weakness abroad. But in his sport, where players set large parts of their own schedules, displaying a repeatable competitive advantage is an opportunity, not a liability.1Unlike, say, in the NBA, where an Eastern Conference team that struggles out west can’t replace trips to California with more home dates.Even as he’s pledged to solve his road woes, Isner has filled his calendar with U.S. events. His home-court advantage has helped him rise this month from the world’s No. 13 to No. 10. A couple of weeks ago at a tournament in Indian Wells, Calif., Isner reached the semifinals, where he took a set off No. 2 Novak Djokovic. This week in Miami, he reached the round of 16 but lost on Tuesday to No. 7 Tomas Berdych. In two weeks, Isner will seek to defend his title in Houston.These wouldn’t have passed for spectacular American results when Andre Agassi and Pete Sampras ruled the sport in the 1990s, or even when Andy Roddick and James Blake took up residence in the top 10 during the last decade. These days, though, pretty good is as good as it gets for American men in tennis. None of Isner’s peers got past the round of 64 at either tournament this month; he was the last American man at each by at least two rounds. And no other American man is ranked in the top 60 in the world. (There’s little reason to hope for better things from the next generation: No American ranks in the top 20 in either the under-20 or under-21 world rankings.)Isner is famous among casual fans for his role in the longest match ever played, which he won over Nicolas Mahut at Wimbledon in 2010, with the basketball-like 70-68 score in the fifth set. But he’s done his best work at home. Fourteen of his 17 career finals and six of his eight career titles have come in the United States. He’s been an entirely average player at the tour level2This means matches that count towards a player’s official match record: matches at Grand Slam tournaments, in Davis Cup matches and at ATP World Tour events. away from the U.S., winning 51 percent of his matches. At American events, he’s won 69 percent.“I always play my best in the United States,” Isner said at a press conference in Indian Wells. “A lot of times, especially in Europe, I have ‑‑ you know, I haven’t had great results at all.” He was at a loss to explain why, offering perhaps a lack of toughness at overseas tournaments. “There is no reason I can’t have a result like this outside of the U.S.,” he said.The reasons for Isner’s home advantage are varied. The obvious suspects, like the surface he’s playing on and the strength of his opponents, don’t fully explain it. A lot of it comes down to Isner himself.It’s true that much of Isner’s home success has come against weak competition. He has thrived at smaller U.S. tournaments that are optional for top players, who mostly live in Europe and don’t bother to make the trip. These events account for all of his U.S. titles and all but two of his U.S. finals. Just 6 percent of his matches at those events have come against top 10 players, none ranked in the top four. The relative weakness of his competition thanks to these events can be seen in the median ranking of his opponents over the last year: just 64, making his the softest schedule of any player in the top 35 in the world rankings.Isner also gets to play on hard courts, his favorite surface, at most of the U.S. events where he chooses to play. Just two are played on other surfaces: Houston, on clay; and Newport, R.I., on grass.These factors alone don’t explain Isner’s U.S. success, though. I pulled his career match record and ran a logistic regression, controlling for surface,3Isner has played 32 matches on grass, 66 matches on clay and 256 matches on hard courts. I separately ran the regression with each surface and also combining hard and grass, since so few matches are played on grass. The results were essentially the same. the ranking of his opponent4Technically I used the logarithm of his opponent’s ranking, since there is a much wider gap between the No. 1 and No. 10 players in the world — and therefore the probability of beating each one — than there is between the No. 10 and No. 100 players. and the value of each match, in ranking points.5The goal was to check whether Isner plays better in higher-leverage matches, those that count for more — i.e. matches in big tournaments, or later rounds of smaller ones. If he does, this effect could be confused with a preference for home courts. That’s because many of his U.S. events have weak fields, pitting Isner against early-round opponents whom he’d likely beat anywhere. That gives him more high-stakes home matches, so if he thrives in high-stakes matches, it might help explain his home advantage.To calculate the leverage of each match, I took the number of ranking points Isner would receive if he lost the match and subtracted it from the number he would get if he won, then lost the subsequent match. The result is roughly the value of the match, as prize money rises with ranking points and the points also determine a player’s subsequent seedings and affect his earning potential. The calculation is complicated by the ATP’s change in ranking points in 2009, so it isn’t exact, but since most of Isner’s tour-level matches came after 2008, the effect is small. Even after controlling for these factors, Isner remains a homecoming king. Surface, it turns out, isn’t a statistically significant driver of his success. Nor is the value of winning the match. His opponent’s ranking is highly significant. But independent of these factors, a 50-50 match for Isner away from home becomes a match he’ll win two out of three times in the U.S.Tennis isn’t usually associated with strong home-court effects, because of its individual and international nature. Many events draw fans from across the globe, who cheer for players from countries other than their own. And most players get few chances to play at home outside of the Davis Cup, the partisan international team competition that provides a rare home-court advantage in tennis. A popular explanation for home advantage in many other sports — that officials are influenced by partisan crowds — doesn’t translate to tennis because electronic line-call review at the sport’s top levels has greatly reduced the potential influence of subjective calls on match outcomes.Perhaps Isner thrives so much at home because of his background in college tennis, a level of competition where the team is primary. Isner starred at the University of Georgia and loves college team sports, spending much of a press conference last Saturday in Miami breaking down his NCAA men’s basketball tournament bracket. Isner counts on support from American crowds, and was taken aback by U.S. Open fans’ cheers for his opponent, Frenchman Gael Monfils, last summer.Isner lamented his inconsistency away from home in that Indian Wells press conference, and he’d naturally rather do as well outside the U.S. as he does in it. But if he had to choose between his unbalanced current record and, say, maintaining the same win probability everywhere, he should opt for the status quo. Ranking points and prize money nearly double at each stage of a tournament, rewarding players who alternate finals with first-round exits over players who consistently lose in the second round.6We can illustrate this by imagining a simplified five-tournament sequence in which each tournament has 32 players and five rounds. Points and prize money double each round, from one point and $1 for a first-round exit up to 32 points and $32 for a title.Player A, with one title and four first-round losses, would pick up 32 points and $32 for the title, and an additional four points and $4 for the other four tournaments, for a total haul of 36 points and $36. His record would be 5-4.Player B, with five quarterfinal exits, would get four points and $4 in each tournament, for a total of 20 points and $20 — barely half the yield of Player A, despite a superior win-loss record of 10-5.So inconsistency in tennis is good. Even better is predictable inconsistency. A player who doesn’t know when he’ll thrive can’t plan around it. Someone who does best at clay-court events can schedule as many as he can fit in. A player who plays best at home ought to schedule as many home tournaments as possible. Isner has learned that lesson. He has reaped the benefits of a tournament calendar that still features a significant number of U.S. events, even as players from other countries have ascended in the rankings.In addition to the U.S. Open and the mandatory events in Indian Wells, Miami and Cincinnati, Isner had 10 ATP events in the U.S. to choose from in 2007 and 2008, his first two years on tour. That number declined to nine, then eight and then, this year, seven. But the decline in American men’s talent has been even steeper during that time, making ranking points at those events low-hanging fruit for Isner. Combine the easy fields with his home-court preference, and Isner finds lots of success in places such as Atlanta, Winston Salem, N.C., and Houston — even as events he played earlier in his career in Indianapolis, Las Vegas, San Jose, Calif., and New Haven, Conn., have vanished.Early in his career, Isner didn’t choose so well for himself. In his first two years on tour, he opted to play just three of his 10 non-mandatory events in the U.S. But from 2009 to 2013, he managed to play 29 of his 53 optional events in the U.S., even though only one-fifth of such events took place there. Last year, the U.S. hosted eight of these events, and Isner played in seven. He reached the semifinals of six and the finals of three, winning twice.Isner has taken advantage of his home-court preference more wisely than his peer and frequent doubles partner, Sam Querrey. I ran the same analysis on Querrey, the second-ranked American man today. For Querrey, too, surface and leverage weren’t significant. He also showed a significant home-court advantage, though the effect was smaller and less significant than for Isner.7A 50-50 match away from the U.S. for Querrey would turn into a match he’d win 62 percent of the time at home. Yet after playing almost exclusively at home in his rookie year on tour, Querrey has opted to play events away from the U.S. almost as often as home tournaments, averaging one more optional road trip per year than Isner.Perhaps many players would show a strong, significant home advantage if they had the chance. None of the world’s top five players gets more than two or three home events each year. Players from the other Grand Slam-hosting countries — the U.K., France and Australia — have a few more opportunities. But those countries combined have about the same number of tournaments as the U.S.Tennis’s general move away from the U.S., and Isner’s impending 29th birthday, might keep him from entering as many home events in the future. He’s compensating by making more of his opportunities and stepping up at the bigger U.S. events, such as this month’s strong runs and his finals in Cincinnati last year and in Indian Wells the year before that. If Isner can keep improving at the big U.S. events, he won’t have to worry about getting better away from home. read more

Serena Williams Umpire Punished Her More Harshly Than Male

Serena Williams talks with referee Brian Earley during the women’s final of the U.S. Open tennis tournament against Naomi Osaka, of Japan, Saturday, Sept. 8, 2018, in New York. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez)NEW YORK (AP) — Serena Williams thought she was treated more harshly by the chair umpire in the U.S. Open final than a man would have been.Williams was cited by official Carlos Ramos for three code violations during her 6-2, 6-4 loss to Naomi Osaka on Saturday: for getting coaching signals; for breaking her racket, which cost her a point; and for calling the chair umpire a thief, which cost her a game.“I’ve seen other men call other umpires several things. I’m here fighting for women’s rights and for women’s equality and for all kinds of stuff. For me to say ‘thief,’ and for him to take a game, it made me feel like it was a sexist remark. He’s never taken a game from a man because they said ‘thief,’” Williams said at her news conference.“For me, it blows my mind,” Williams said. “But I’m going to continue to fight for women.”Earlier, as Williams pleaded her case on court with tournament referee Brian Earley, calling the penalties unfair, she said: “Because you’re a woman, you’re going to take this away from me?”“There’s a lot of men out here that have said a lot of things,” Williams said, “and because they are men , that doesn’t happen.”Two-time Australian Open champion and two-time U.S. Open runner-up Victoria Azarenka backed up Williams’ stance, writing on Twitter : “If it was men’s match, this wouldn’t happen like this. It just wouldn’t”Billie Jean King, who won 12 Grand Slam singles titles and helped found the women’s tennis tour and pave the way for equal prize money in the sport, also commented via Twitter on what happened Saturday.“Several things went very wrong during” the match, King wrote. “Coaching on every point should be allowed in tennis. It isn’t, and as a result, a player was penalized for the actions of her coach. This should not happen.”In a second tweet, King said: “When a woman is emotional, she’s ‘hysterical’ and she’s penalized for it. When a man does the same, he’s ‘outspoken’ & and there are no repercussions. Thank you (Serena Williams) for calling out this double standard. More voices are needed to do the same.”There have been a series of recent happenings that illustrate the ways in which tennis does do things differently for men and women.Just before the U.S. Open, the French tennis federation president said that the black catsuit worn this year by Williams at the French Open would not be allowed at that tournament in the future. During the U.S. Open, a female player, Alize Cornet, was incorrectly admonished by a chair umpire for changing her shirt during a match, which is allowed — and which men do all the time. And the U.S. Tennis Association created a new rule last week that allows for a 10-minute break in men’s matches when the heat and humidity are too harsh; previously, only women were given that chance for a delay.“I just feel like the fact that I have to go through this is just an example for the next person that has emotions, and that want to express themselves, and want to be a strong woman. They’re going to be allowed to do that because of today,” Williams said. “Maybe it didn’t work out for me, but it’s going to work out for the next person.” read more

Heres An Idea Falcons Throw To Julio Jones In The Red Zone

Julio Jones is unlike most other star receivers. He doesn’t scream at his quarterback or sulk or throw a tantrum when passes don’t come his way. He’s happy to share the wealth with his teammates. In short, he’s no diva.But if any NFL wide receiver has earned the right to complain on the sidelines, it’s Jones. The Falcons star hasn’t scored a touchdown this season — and in fact has underperformed his whole career when it comes to scoring. His touchdown rate has never come close to matching his outsized production everywhere else on the field. So maybe the Falcons — who have scored just 17 points in each of their past two games (both losses) heading into their Super Bowl rematch with the Patriots on Sunday — would actually benefit from Jones flipping a Gatorade cooler or two.Since 2014, Jones has been nothing short of unstoppable. He’s been the NFL’s most productive receiver when measured by yards per game, the second best in terms of receptions per game and the third best in yards per target.1Among all wide receivers and tight ends who have averaged at least 50 yards in at least 25 games since 2014. In those three-plus seasons, he’s averaging 104.8 yards but a ho-hum 0.4 touchdowns per game, which is roughly the same as less-heralded wideouts such as Allen Hurns, Emmanuel Sanders and Jordan Matthews. For an elite receiver, Jones is solidly middle-of-the-pack in touchdown production: Last Sunday, Atlanta lost to the Dolphins in the final minute when Ryan forced a pass in double coverage to second-year tight end Austin Hooper (36 career catches) instead of giving Jones a chance to make a play. The result was a game-ending interception at the Miami 6-yard line. While Jones said nothing, head coach Dan Quinn made it clear that he wasn’t pleased with bypassing his team’s best weapon.Atlanta’s strange unwillingness to use its best receiver has now spanned three offensive coordinators. When the current one, Steve Sarkisian, was handed the keys to the offense that in 2016 led the NFL in scoring, he saw one major area where the unit could improve.“Is there a way to get Julio more touches in the red zone and finding those matchups?” Sarkisian said at the time.The answer, apparently, is “no.”Check out our latest NFL predictions. The 51 receivers on the chart above average a scoring strike every 157.1 yards. Jones averages a TD for every 262 yards he accumulates, which is the third most extreme discrepancy in the sample.2Only Vincent Jackson and Willie Snead have Jones beat here, with 343.6 and 270 yards per touchdown respectively. The Dallas Cowboys’ Dez Bryant, meanwhile, leads all receivers in fewest yards per touchdown, 92.7, but that’s probably no accident: Bryant has long made it clear that he expects a big portion of the touchdown glory — or someone, possibly everyone, is going to hear about it.Jones’s scoring woes almost defy explanation. Receivers who thirst for touchdowns are generally undersized players who do their damage between the 20s. But Jones is one of the game’s largest targets at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. He’s also one of the position’s best athletes, crushing his scouting combine in speed, jumping ability and agility. It’s tough to imagine a better receiver his size on the NFL boundaries when it comes to getting both feet down inbounds and defying gravity in the process. If an NFL quarterback were to design a perfect red-zone weapon in a lab, he would look a lot like Jones.Incredibly, Jones’s lack of scoring seems to be by design. His percentage of QB Matt Ryan’s targets drops steadily the closer Atlanta gets to the goal line: from 32.8 percent of passes when the Falcons are at least 80 yards from the end zone to just a little more than half that — 16.7 percent — when they’re in the red zone. read more

Five takeaways from Bowling Green Samuel shines defense stands tall

The Ohio State football team prepares to run onto the field prior to the first game of the 2016 season against Bowling Green on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAfter a 77-10 rout of the Bowling Green Falcons on Saturday, the Ohio State football team appears to be ready for the challenges ahead in 2016. Here are five takeaways from the game.Samuel the workhorse for OSUEarlier in the spring, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer named junior H-back Curtis Samuel as his No. 1 playmaker. Known for his speed and agility, Buckeye fans got a glimpse Saturday as to why Meyer had faith in Samuel. Touching the ball 22 times, the junior picked up 261 all-purpose yards and three total touchdowns. Although the day was a chance to see how redshirt sophomore Noah Brown and redshirt senior Corey Smith would perform at wide receiver after season-ending injuries last season, Samuel was the leading pass catcher on Saturday.Redshirt freshman Mike Weber was the leading rusher on the day, receiving 19 carries. Samuel was the second leading rusher on the day, handling the ball on the ground 13 times. Weber will be facing stiff competition with Samuel playing at such a high level.“It’s a great feeling to be one of the first people out there to touch the ball. I have to keep my mind right,” Samuel said. “I just want to ball out and make opportunities for my team.”One thing is certain after OSU faced Bowling Green; Samuel really is a playmaker. The Silver Bullets are fast and have depthRedshirt junior defensive tackle Tracy Sprinkle sustained what appeared to be a serious right knee injury in the first quarter. OSU fans’ worst fears were confirmed by Meyer at the press conference following the game, as it was announced that the early indication is a patellar tendon injury, most likely requiring surgery. “Tracy’s been my roommate since we first got here. Me and Tracy, we were real close during recruiting,” junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said. “I love Tracy to death. That’s my brother. When he went down, it was the worst thing. He’s family to me.”Although the loss of Sprinkle might hurt in the long run, the Buckeyes regrouped quickly and had little drop off without their primary defensive tackle on the field. Much of the reason for the success can be credited to the depth Meyer and the rest of the OSU coaching staff has talked about all spring.As for the speed of the defense, the ability of Buckeye defenders to chase down ball carriers and undercut routes to prevent receptions was showcased throughout all four characters. On two occasions, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker used his speed to track down the ball and come up with an interception.“Greg Schiano, who has coached at the highest level in football in the pros, and his comments to me about the things Malik can do,” Meyer said. “He can do whatever he trains to do.”Holes filled up quickly by linebackers and secondary defenders, preventing long carries by Bowling Green. Although a few players showcased potential weakness in coverage and pass rushing, the speed of OSU’s defense quickly made up for the miscues. The Buckeyes’ coaching staff definitely were right in saying this team is faster than last year’s. The secondary can depend on more than Gareon ConleyAlthough the only returning starter for the OSU secondary was redshirt junior Gareon Conley, the Buckeyes looked sharp throughout the afternoon. Bowling Green struggled to create any offense through the air, and Hooker came up with two big interceptions. True freshman cornerback Rodjay Burns took full advantage of his time on the field, picking off Bowling Green backup quarterback James Morgan and returning the ball 75 yards for a touchdown. The Buckeyes surrendered just 175 yards through the air.“We have a lot of talent,” junior cornerback Damon Webb said. “We’re just trying to get guys as much experience as we can and get guys on the field because we have a lot of talent, and we want to show it.”The longest pass the Falcons could muster all day was 17 yards, a testament to the swarming secondary play OSU enjoyed. They may not have the likes of Eli Apple, Tyvis Powell or Vonn Bell. But the Scarlet and Gray may just have a dominant group of cornerbacks and safeties for 2016. J.T. Barrett has maturedWhen redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett first appeared for the Buckeyes in 2014 to replace the injured Braxton Miller, Barrett helped lead the team to the College Football Playoff. Although the offense succeeded under the then-freshman, the workload of former running back Ezekiel Elliott was thought to have carried the team through most of the season. Barrett was considered immature as a player and needed time to develop. The game against Bowling Green Saturday is a testament to just how far he has come as a player. Misreading a route early in the first quarter, Barrett gave up a pick-six to Falcons linebacker Brandon Harris.“Throwing an interception for a touchdown we don’t like that,” Meyer said. “But rebound, let’s go, and he went right back and said that’s on me.”Barrett went on to complete 21 passes on 31 attempts and toss six touchdowns on 349 yards, adding another score on the ground. The seven touchdowns he was responsible for set a new record for OSU. All of this was accomplished with more than six minutes left in the third quarter.After finishing fifth in Heisman voting in 2014, Barrett makes for a compelling player who just may find himself on voters ballots this year if he can continue with this kind of production. Mike Weber has the potential to succeed at OSUAfter the recruiting saga that went with Weber, the debut of the Detroit native was delayed after a meniscus tear in his knee resulted in a redshirt season in his freshman campaign. In the spring of 2016, Weber had many expectations to meet from his coaches, and that’s exactly what he did.OSU running backs coach Tony Alford called Weber’s parents on Wednesday to share the news that their son was going to be the starting running back for the Scarlet and Gray.In his first game as a Buckeye, Weber rushed for 136 yards on 19 carries. Although he failed to score, Weber showcased a punishing running style, especially on his first carry. After being tripped a few yards from the line of scrimmage, Weber barreled into the defender in front of him, flattening the would-be tackler. The crowd erupted in cheers.Meyer spoke highly of his tailback, but extended the challenge to Weber of running a bit more like departed Ezekiel Elliott. Lofty standards for a guy appearing in his first game, but a good showing for the redshirt freshman nonetheless. read more

Chris May sparks Ohio State mens lacrosse from the faceoff X

Senior midfielder Chris May (left) is widely considered the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterWhile snow continues to fall as March begins on Ohio State’s campus, in the lacrosse world, all signs point to May.Chris May, that is, who is now the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.The Buckeyes fell just short of a win against Marquette on Sunday, losing 10-9, and while the team went 1-1 on the weekend in Louisville, Ky., May went 32 of 39 on the weekend in faceoffs, earning the Big Ten Specialist of the Week for the third time this season. And though he is more successful than ever, the graduate transfer has a “pretty crazy story” about his journey from Georgetown University to his first season with OSU.“My senior year, I was only in pads for a few practices,” he said. “I was coming off a shoulder injury when I tore my Achilles tendon … Once I got hurt, I started focusing on my future and graduate school. I’ve been a Buckeye fan my whole life … I realized I only had one shot to do this, so I really worked hard.”At Georgetown, he only stepped onto the field for 22 games, but now after just six with the Buckeyes, May has won 75 percent of his faceoffs and snagged 60 ground balls, thriving in a position named aptly for the precise skill set it requires.“It’s a unique position,” OSU assistant coach Jamison Koesterer said. “It’s mental, just hearing the whistle, finding a rhythm between what he hears and what he needs to execute physically … It definitely takes athleticism, but it also takes savvy, a little bit of poise and IQ to understand and anticipate where the ball might come out.”May’s success at the midfield X results not only from a consistent process, but also an unwavering support from his team, enabling him to aid the offense in taking the ball to the net.“A lot goes into it, but I just try to get a good reaction off the whistle and fight for the ball,” May said. “We’ve got a lot of great offensive players. A lot of guys who can score, but they can’t score if they don’t have the ball … But it’s a group effort, we have a great unit. It’s a great dynamic.”Although May is the new kid on the block with the Buckeyes, former high school teammate and OSU senior captain David Planning said he enjoys feeding off May’s familiar energy.“He’s such an easy guy to play with,” Planning said. “He knows what his job is. It makes it a lot easier on the offense and the defense.”With a lacrosse resume stronger than most of his younger OSU teammates, May assimilated quickly. He assumed a leadership role, but admitted his teammates teach him a few things too.“Being older than a lot of the guys, I feel like I have more experience,” May said. “I’m trying to be a role model for the younger guys, but I’m still learning a lot from the older guys too.”And while May continues to fine-tune his craft at the X, the rest of the Buckeyes look to learn from the loss at Marquette, revisiting the drawing board but “hungry” to return to the field.“We’re getting back to the basics on both sides of the ball,” coach Nick Myers said. “There’s always a desire coming off a loss wanting to look at what went wrong and how to fix it. Tuesday, we practiced in the pouring rain for two hours and these guys didn’t blink an eye … It’s a long wait till Saturday whenever you lose, so they’re excited.”The Buckeyes stand at the threshold of an uphill climb, facing three top 20 opponents before heading into conference play, but Planning said the team isn’t focusing on the opposition.“Our focus is on us,” Planning said. “We want to dictate the tempo and the style of play, and that starts with us.”With that goal in mind, Planning, May and the rest of the Buckeyes are set to move to Ohio Stadium on March 7 to take on Hofstra at 1 p.m. read more

Rodgers tips Kilmarnock to emulate Leicesters heroics

first_imgLeicester City’s historic Premier League title-winning season can be an inspiration for Kilmarnock according to Celtic manager Brendan Rodgers.Aberdeen clinched the league title in 1985 and that was the league was won by a team other than Celtic or Rangers, but Kilmarnock are one point ahead of Celtic and Rodgers believes they can emulate the Leicester City of 2015/2016 season.“They deserve all the credit that they get. It is not by accident. It has been a real consistent run now over the last year or so,” Rodgers told Sky Sports.“Steve has done a brilliant job in terms of how he organizes them, the way they want to play and consistently they have got very good results.“Okay they have played two more matches than us but they are still in a position where some people wouldn’t expect them to be.“But if you watch them clearly, closely over the last year or so Steve and the players have done a great job in term of how they have worked.Leicester City, Manchester UnitedMatch Preview: Manchester United vs Leicester City Boro Tanchev – September 13, 2019 Old Trafford is the venue for the Premier League encounter between Manchester United and Leicester City, which kicks off at 16:00 (CET) on Saturday.“They are a very difficult team to beat so we know we have to be at our best to get a result we want.“They will feel why not. I think what Leicester have done to probably every team other than a so-called big club is they have made the impossible possible.“But like I say it is still very early. We have played 14 games. Get down to when there are 10 games to go and then we will see where we are at. But what they have shown is the level of consistency.“They are a very good side. They have got good players, some experienced players there and obviously, Steve and his staff have done a great job so I am sure they will be up there throughout the season.”last_img read more

Man Found Deceased In Trailer On Hope Highway

first_imgAccording to Megan Peters, Spokeswoman with AST, no foul play is suspected. AST responded and located the owner of the truck, Christopher J. Nash, age 58 of Anchorage, deceased in the trailer. Nash was transported to the State Medical Examiner for autopsy. The next of kin has been notified.center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska State Troopers, Soldotna Dispatch, received a  request for a welfare check on the occupant of a truck and trailer near mile 2.0 of the Hope Highway, on March 13.last_img

A Response to Subcompact Publishing

first_imgSo why do so many of our digital magazines publish on the same schedule, with the same number of articles as their print counterparts? Using the same covers? Of course, they do because it’s easier to maintain identical schedules across mediums. To not design twice. To not test twice (or, at all).Unfortunately—from a medium-specific user experience point of view—it’s almost impossible to produce a digitally indigenous magazine beholden to those legacy constraints. Why? Not least because we use tablets and smartphones very differently than we use printed publications.The key here, for Mod, is the “indigenous magazine”—a product born exclusively for the mobile-digital platform, free of any print production and pricing frameworks. He goes on to highlight The Magazine, created by Marco Arment, as a perfect example of the digitally indigenous magazine. It’s short (four or five articles), it’s design is breezy and open, it’s file size is small, it’s cheap and easy to snack on.This all may be true, and there’s probably an audience for The Magazine and future brands just like it. But what’s wrong with publishing a tablet magazine that’s full of print magazine design and rich media content, that’s $4.99 for a single copy and might take all night to download to Apple’s Newsstand? Nothing, really, because there’s room in the market for the digitally indigenous magazine and the digital magazine that’s married, for good or bad, to its print namesake. I understand that with digital comes an expectation of disruption and re-invention. And not just an expectation, but actual disruption. But it’s also a world where all sorts of business models live and play.I don’t think Mod is necessarily saying all publishers need to drop their old-school, print-legacy-based digital magazines and start producing $2, 4-article, scrolling mini-apps. He does say though, that publishers are balking at producing products like these because they’re not based on a familiar model and they’re not likely to produce immediate and significant returns. Funnily enough, neither have the full-blown tablet magazines, for now. What will be interesting to see is how much the subcompact model informs or influences the sedan version of digital magazines—or simply rides next to it. An essay by Craig Mod has been making the rounds lately among media watchers. It’s a terrific read. Mod, a current independent writer and former Flipbook employee, touts what he’s calling the Subcompact Manifesto, which places a premium on a minimalist approach to digital publishing. His manifesto emerges out of one of the main criticisms ‘traditional’ publishers have received for their tablet magazines and apps: They’re unwieldy, hard to use, have too many bells and whistles and take up too much room. But most importantly, they’re tied to print production schedules, design and pricing. In other words, tablet editions are not exploiting the medium in the open, nimble, socially-forward way they could and/or should be.As Mod says: last_img read more

Joni Mitchell Gets Candid In New Biography

first_img Facebook GRAMMY winner finally opens up about her life in David Yaffe’s ‘Reckless Daughter: A Portrait Of Joni Mitchell’Renée FabianGRAMMYs Nov 8, 2017 – 12:17 pm Joni Mitchell has led a notoriously press-averse life — until now.In a new biography from David Yaffe titled Reckless Daughter: A Portrait Of Joni Mitchell, the GRAMMY winner has candidly opened up about her life in the world of rock and roll, and she doesn’t hold back.Rolling Stone highlights some of the notable moments, including her thoughts on one-time lover James Taylor, working with David Crosby as a producer, her thoughts on Bob Dylan’s Blood On The Tracks, singing while high with Neil Young, an encounter with Miles Davis, and sets the record straight about breaking up with Jackson Browne.Her uncensored memories serve as illuminating tidbits to complement the rest of Yaffe’s chronicle of the famed singer/songwriter’s life. Starting with her childhood, he works his way through all of her albums and their recording, her move toward jazz, and finally through her life-threatening aneurysm in 2015.Pick up your copy of this portrait of a legend for all the details you don’t want to miss. HBO Documentary Traces ‘Rolling Stone’ Music Culture Joni Mitchell Gets Candid In New Biography News Twitter Email Joni Mitchell Opens Up In Biography joni-mitchell-gets-candid-new-biographylast_img read more