Facebook’s Copycat Strategy: All The Innovation It Needs

first_imgGuide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Matt Asay Tags:#Facebook#innovation#Instagram#Microsoft#twitter#video Two-thirds of its 1.1 billion monthly active users log into Facebook through their mobile phones. Facebook doesn’t need to dazzle these users with Home or some other contraption. Facebook simply needs to maintain its comfortable experience for existing users while adding in functionality that takes off elsewhere, like Instagram Video (copying Twitter) or check-ins (copying Foursquare).While some numbers have suggested a teenage exodus off the platform, the truth is more complex.Facebook’s Willingness To Bet (And Buy) BigAnd when a rival service shows enough growth with teens or other desirable demographics to warrant it, Facebook can simply acquire the product. While the company already dominated photo sharing, Facebook acquired Instagram to give its mobile photo business a jumpstart. Facebook can afford to buy out rivals, given the mountainous cash hoard it raised in its IPO.This is why I’m sanguine on Facebook’s future. The social networking giant is in the perfect position to survey the market for rising innovations and blend them into the existing Facebook experience in ways that complement the comfortable Facebook experience. Usually this can be done through home-grown development, but when an acquisition is needed, the company has shown the willingness to spend big on a category leader.This is in stark contrast to another market leader that has generally embraced the embrace-and-extend approach to innovation: Microsoft. As The Wall Street Journal‘s Rolfe Winkler puts it, “Microsoft keeps hitching its fortunes to lame horses,” turning to Nokia, Yahoo!, Dell, Barnes and Noble and other great companies whose market presence has faded. So long as Facebook is willing to clone or acquire the best rival innovations, it should be able to continue growing its revenue even as it improves its utility to new and existing users. Facebook increasingly plays copycat to Twitter and other Silicon Valley upstarts when it comes to innovation, but with over 1.1 billion active users, Facebook can afford to be a fast follower. Indeed, the right strategy may well be to simply copy or acquire others’ innovations as they become popular. After all, as much as people may wring their hands about Instagram or Snapchat beating Facebook to this or that feature, the hardest feature of all to copy is a massive, built-in audience. A Quick History Of Facebook Imitations (Er, “Innovations”)A quick review of Facebook’s most recent product updates suggests that the company is having trouble coming up with novel features. Hashtags are the latest feature to arrive, a clear rip-off of Twitter, and just before that Instagram Video, which looked suspiciously like Twitter’s Vine. Or how about its check-in feature, which mimicked Foursquare? While some might pillory Facebook for lacking creativity, the fact is that being a fast (or even slow) follower is arguably the right strategy for a company with such a deep installed base. When was the last time you or your friends actually celebrated Facebook changing its interface or otherwise altering your comfortable Facebook experience?And did anyone really want Facebook Home? This counts as real innovation and it also counts as a serious innovation misstep.It turns out that copying others’ functionality is not only safe, it’s smart. Just ask Apple. Apple hasn’t innovated the portable music player, smartphone or tablet. Yet it still dominates either market share or profit share in all of these markets by improving upon others’ innovations. Predicting the future is really hard and frankly doesn’t usually lead to big paydays. But making that future safe and easy for a large audience? That pays big dividends.Facebook’s Numbers Suggest It’s Doing Things RightWhile Facebook has a lot of work to do on its monetization strategy, and its advertising still leaves something to be desired, as Hunter Walk points out, the company continues to print money. Critics howled that the company didn’t “get” mobile, but each quarter the percentage of Facebook’s company’s revenue derived from mobile keeps growing, most recently jumping to 30% in its Q1 2013, up from 23% a year ago. Related Posts Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Audit The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videoslast_img read more

More choices for national volley squad

first_imgBSP sees higher prices in November, but expects stronger peso, low rice costs to put up fight Read Next LOOK: Loisa Andalio, Ronnie Alonte unwind in Amanpulo for 3rd anniversary View comments Frontrow holds fun run to raise funds for young cancer patients  LATEST STORIES “By next week we will sit down and make selection although I have something in mind already,” acting Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. president Pete Cayco told the Inquirer.“We will have 20 players in the pool, so we will make additions and I would like to get more players from the PVL (Premier Volleyball League) like Myla Pablo.”FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutCayco had already talked with PVL officials regarding schedules and he said they appeared amenable to accommodate the national team calendar.At present, the Philippine team has a 14-woman pool that includes just one PVL player, superstar Alyssa Valdez. So nears last 16 Nonong Araneta re-elected as PFF president Philippine volleyball will reboot its program by getting six more players to bolster its pool to a 20-woman squad.Soon after the Philippine Superliga All-Star team arrives from a competition in Thailand, the coaching staff will meet to discuss the expansion of the squad which will eventually eye the gold in the 2019 Southeast Asian Games here.ADVERTISEMENT Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Fire hits houses in Mandaluyong City WATCH: Streetboys show off slick dance moves in Vhong Navarro’s wedding E.T. returns to earth, reunites with grown-up Elliott in new ad  Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd PLAY LIST 02:25PH women’s volleyball team motivated to deliver in front of hometown crowd00:50Trending Articles02:11Trump awards medals to Jon Voight, Alison Krauss01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games MOST READlast_img read more

PUJA-THEME SONGS 2 LAST

first_imgFor Naktala Udayan Sangha, which is patronized by StateFor Naktala Udayan Sangha, which is patronized by State Education Minister Partha Chatterjee, the theme song is being sung by singer Surojit and Sayan Ghosh. The theme of the puja is inner value.”The theme song these days are integral part of Durga Puja. Just like theme based pujas, theme songs are also an important part of Puja,” Chatterjee told PTI.The theme song of Hindusthan Club this year is called ?Parar Gaan? (Song of the Neighbourhood). It has been penned by senior TMC leader Chandrima Bhattacharya and music is composed by Debaditya Chaudhury.TMC MLA Sujit Bose, who is Sreebhumi Sporting Club puja organiser, said “This year we have incorporated theme song in our Durga Puja. We hope to receive a good response.”One of the organisers of this big budget puja said theme songs have picked up in the past two to three years. “The tradition of music albums during Durga Puja has declined over the years. So it was decided that Durga puja committees on their own will organize the theme songs.”Echoing him, a puja organiser of south Kolkata, an area known to have more theme pujas, said, “Durga Puja has always been a time when we have traditionally seen so many melodious compositions over the years. Now things have changed and puja organisers are themselves using theme songs to make their Durga Puja more attractive.”The theme songs are released as audio CDs 15-20 days ahead of Durga Puja and are also uploaded on Youtube.advertisementSome of the clubs who cannot afford to pay for topnotch musicians and singers, opt for local singers and have DJs to compose the theme song for their clubs.”We have taken help of a DJ who performs in one of the night clubs in Kolkata and a local singer for our theme song. Since the theme is folk-based, the music too will be in tune with it. The music will incorporate the traditional dhaak to ring in the Puja feeling,” said yet another puja organiser. PTI PNT KK SUS DVlast_img read more

Two can’t miss webinars: Dan Heath and Guy Kawasaki!

first_imgNetwork for Good has two amazing webinars coming up – and (as usual) they are free with registration.*Nonprofit 911: How to Get More Followers on Social Media w/ Guy KawasakiThursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. EasternWhy isn’t your hashtag everywhere? When’s the best time for a Facebook status update? What does it mean when someone +1’s you on Google +? How come no one liked your picture, story, update, tweet, share, friendship, etc? You might be caught a social media slump!Tune in Thursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear tech and social media expert Guy Kawasaki lead a free presentation giving nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via the most popular social media platforms.Register here.Nonprofit 911: The Decisive Organization: Building a Culture of Better Decision-MakingMonday, March 25 at 1 p.m. EasternBest-selling Switch author Dan Heath’s done it again! Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work hits shelves next week. He’s going to stop by and pre-release the most helpful decision-making practices to the Network for Good audience via a Nonprofit 911 webinar on Monday, the 25th at 1 p.m. Eastern. Join Dan Heath as he makes it easier for your organization to make that sound decision. Bonus: Dan will be giving away a free copy of his new book to 10 lucky nonprofits on the call.Register here.*If you can’t make the date for Guy Kawasaki, sign up anyway. You will get a recording of the webinar afterward! Dan Heath’s session is live only, so we won’t be sending recordings.last_img read more

5 Ways to Use Stories to Increase Donations

first_imgThere are infinite ways to tell your nonprofit stories, but do you know which ones will lead to more donations? Check out these great tips shared in our free webinar, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 2. Share stories on your blog.Blogging is a great way to grow your online presence, establish credibility, and increase your reach. You can highlight specific constituents, volunteers, staff, and board members—you can even let them write their own stories. Tying your blog to your website makes these testimonials, updates on upcoming events, and ongoing campaigns easy for visitors to access without receiving direct communication from you. 4. Turn donors into advocates with nurturing emails.Nurturing emails are a great way to consistently share your stories. Send welcome emails after a friend signs up for your blog, or deliver a series of emails to build anticipation once a guest signs up for an event. The goal is to familiarize people with your organization, explain how you’re being successful, describe what you want to accomplish, and share stories of successful fundraisers. Make what you’re doing human and relatable to inspire people to fundraise and advocate for your cause. 5. Revamp your annual report.After your annual report is published, do you know how many people are actually reading it? Chances are it’s not many! Because your annual report contains the proof, data, and impact of your mission, you should do everything possible to make people want to read it. Make it beautiful (forget endless columns of small black text), shareable (does it include great pictures and Twitter icons?), visual (do you have infographics and appealing charts to make your content easy to digest?), and accessible (is it easy to understand, and does it fit on your website?). Making your annual report more creative will encourage people to read it, share it, and donate in support of it!Want to learn more about how telling your stories can lead to better donor involvement and more money? Download the on-demand webinar presentation, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 3. Tie donor actions to numbers.This might not sound like a story, but trust us, it is! Close the loop for your supporters by letting them know exactly what their donation will give someone else. Will it mean two pairs of shoes, a warm meal, an immunization? Donors love to know where their money is going and what impact they’re making on someone’s life. Including a visual makes the story of a donation more compelling to a potential donor. Many organizations are hesitant to make a video; it can be expensive, time consuming, and technical. But it can also be easy and inspiring. Connect with your viewers by telling them an easy-to-follow short story that centers on just one or two people. Focus on the quality of the story and engaging your viewer, not on making a super-high-quality video. Your supporters know you’re not Hollywood, so your video doesn’t need to be as technically savvy. 1. Tell personal stories through video. last_img read more

Fundraising Benchmarks, Donor Data, and You: A Q&A with Heather Yandow

first_imgI’m a big fan of Heather Yandow from Third Space Studio. Heather produces a labor of love for small and mighty nonprofits: The Individual Donor Benchmark Report (IDBR). The IDBR highlights fundraising data trends for nonprofit organizations with annual budgets under $2 million. If you’d like to share your organization’s data for the next IDBR,  please visit Heather’s website for more info.Keep reading this post to discover why the IDBR’s data is so valuable and to collect a few nuggets of wisdom from Heather about donor data.What is the IDBR and why should organizations care about the findings?Heather Yandow (HY): The Individual Donor Benchmark Report digs into the fundraising data of small and mighty nonprofits, those with annual budgets under $2 million.It’s a best practice that nonprofits need to set goals, track outcomes, and learn from past performance. But collecting and analyzing data in a vacuum only gives part of the picture. Organizations also need to the ability to measure the impact of their fundraising and compare it other organizations like theirs, as well as to the larger sector. That’s why we created the Individual Donor Benchmark Project.There is no other benchmarking resource for smaller organizations with individual donor fundraising programs.  Simply put, the IDBR is a resource for nonprofits to see how they stack up. It helps answer questions like:Where is our fundraising doing well?What parts of our fundraising program might need a little more attention?What experiments could we try to improve our fundraising program? What data do you need to have in order to participate in the research?HY: We’ve tried to streamline the data organizations need to participate to only the most critical metrics. To participate, you’ll need to report numbers like:Organizational revenue and expensesTotal amount of individual donor revenue and number of donorsAmount raised online and number of online donorsYou can preview of the full set of questions on this site .We’ve also decided that none of the questions are required. So, if you are unable to answer a question or two (or five), that’s okay! Set aside one hour to dig into your data. You’d be surprised how much you can accomplish with one focused hour! And you might just get on a roll and keep going. Now, for something fun. On a scale from 1-10, how much do you love data?HY: I’m probably an eight. I do love data and spend a good bit of my time collecting data, training about data, and helping organization harness the power of data. But to be a ten, I think I’d have to be this guy. I’m not there yet! What are common challenges orgs face when trying to access the data they need and how can they overcome these challenges?HY: The most common challenge is that organizations don’t have a database that they know and love. For some, it’s hard to get data out of their system. For others, they don’t trust the data they do access.Here are four tips to help you start gathering this data:Take a look at this year’s survey questions. Print them out and identify what data you can easily find (like last year’s total income) and what might take a little more time to figure out (like retention rate). If you run into problems, know that you can skip a question or two on the survey. I know that sometimes a number just isn’t easily available, so you can just leave that question blank.From Network for Good: Don’t have a user-friendly donor database that can help you store, access, and analyze your donor data? Network for Good’s new donor management system is everything you need and nothing you don’t. Check it out now! Last year’s big finding was about how much more money organizations raised when they had a fundraising plan. Are you looking into that again this year or are you trying to determine new/different factors that contribute to fundraising success/misses?HY: Both! We are definitely digging in to our finding that a fundraising plan is the secret to individual donor success. To start, we want to get a better understanding of what a typical fundraising plan looks like. Does it include an annual development calendar? An analysis of the previous year? We’re hoping that getting more specific information will help identify the critical parts of the fundraising plan.At the same time, we will also be looking into other factors that may contribute to fundraising success, like Board participation in fundraising or the number of meetings organizations hold with donors and potential donors.If organizations want to participate in your research, what’s in it for them and how can they sign up?It’s easy to be part of the survey! Just visit http://www.thirdspacestudio.com/idbproject/ to learn more and start the survey.As a thank you for being part of the survey, you will receive:a results reports as well as the complete survey results to share with your colleagues and Boardan invitation to a special webinar just for survey participants to dig into the resultsa copy of official Individual Donor Benchmark Report and Infographica chance to win one of 50 coveted consultations with Ravela Insights, experts in donor data analytics, database strategy, and prospect identificationa chance to win one of five Grassroots Institute for Fundraising Training prize packs with a subscription to the Grassroots Fundraising Journal as well as a book from the Kim Klein Fundraising Series Consider all the many ways that you might get the data you need. Your database may produce a perfect report – but it might not! You may need to take a closer look at your data by putting it into Excel. Or, you might need to look at the report from your online payment processor to find information about online gifts and monthly donations.last_img read more

The Need for Malaria Integration in Maternal and Newborn Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 11, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The release of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership’s report, “The Contribution of Malaria Control to Maternal and Newborn Health,” made yesterday, July 10th, 2014, an important day for malaria in pregnancy research and programming. Pregnancy was previously identified as a particularly vulnerable time to contract malaria for both mom and baby, but this is the first time the RBM Partnership has released a thematic report specifically dedicated to how malaria affects pregnant women and their newborns.The report was launched during the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in New York by UN health and development leaders. The purpose of the report launch was to forge new partnerships and strengthen existing ones to expand malaria services to one of the most vulnerable populations, pregnant women.An existing solution, with poor deliveryIntermittent preventative treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) have long been the standard for malaria prevention in pregnancy. In 2012, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated these standards by increasing the number of IPTp doses to four during pregnancy. This treatment, delivered during antenatal care (ANC), has existed for decades, but delivery is still poor. Although 77% of pregnant women receive at least one ANC visit in most countries, rates of IPTp and ITN use by pregnant women fall far below global and national targets.Why is malaria prevention part of maternal health?Malaria is both a direct and indirect cause of maternal mortality. Each year 10,000 pregnant women die of malaria infection. In addition, malaria is a major cause of anemia,  which  puts a woman at greater risk for post-partum hemorrhage, the number one cause of maternal death. WHO’s recommended treatment, four doses of IPTp and use of an ITN, can reduce severe maternal anemia by 38% and perinatal mortality by 27%. The treatment’s effectiveness plays a significant role in leading global progress on decreasing maternal mortality. But malaria prophylaxis saves not only women’s lives, but newborn lives as well.Protecting health before birthIPTp and use of ITNs can reduce a newborn’s risk of dying from malaria by 18% in the first 28 days of life; it also provides a 21% decrease in low birth weight, a risk factor for neonatal death. Every year, 75,000 to 200,000 infants die because of a  malaria infection during pregnancy. Also, an additional 100,000 neonatal deaths, or 11% of global neonatal mortality, are due to low birth weight resulting from Plasmodium falciparum, or malaria, infections in pregnancy.Although scale-up of IPTp and ITNs did not meet the global coverage target of 80%, malaria prevention efforts between 2009 and 2012 saved about 94,000 newborns. If global targets had been met, this number could have tripled, with 300,000 neonatal deaths prevented. In addition to preventing neonatal deaths, IPTp and ITNs can reduce miscarriages and stillbirths by 33%.Next stepsAlthough the WHO has given clear guidelines through Focused Antenatal Care (FANC), there is often fragmentation across ANC delivery platforms. Fragmentation makes it difficult to effectively deliver prophylactic malaria interventions through ANC. Solutions to this problem include integration of both funding and service-delivery for malaria, ANC, and maternal health interventions. In addition, countries must harmonize malaria control and maternal health efforts in national policies, guidelines, and funding. Malaria prevention is not just an addendum to current maternal and newborn health interventions, it ensures maternal and newborn health.  With integration we can save lives.Share this:last_img read more

Digital Fundraising and the Modern Donor

first_imgThe modern fundraising landscape has gone digital and there’s no going back. If you want to stay relevant, you need to keep up. Technology has changed the face of our daily interactions and engagement. Social media and text messaging offer instant connection. Smartphones allow you to make calls, check email, play music, download apps, and more. Fitbits track our health and fitness patterns. All of this leads to greater personalization; experiences tailored to the individual. Netflix sends “Top Suggestion” emails based on viewing history. Amazon recommends items based on recent searches. Donors are looking for similarly unique experiences from the nonprofits they support. Whether you’re new to digital fundraising or a seasoned pro, embracing the digital revolution will add value to your donor relationships and boost engagement levels. But, how to create accessibility and transparency in the digital age? The answer’s at your fingertips. Use digital tools—your website, social media, email blasts, online advertising—to engage donors. To learn more, download Fundraising in the Digital Age. Keep reading for a sneak peek into the guide.What Modern Donors WantThe modern donor wants more access to your organization. Share frequent updates about your work and the impact of their gifts. Donors are much more likely to make a second gift if they receive a personalized communication detailing the influence of their support.Digital fundraising is also a great opportunity for your nonprofit to be discovered online. Harness the power of search engine optimization (SEO) to improve your positioning in search engine results. This will allow your website to increase awareness of your mission and attract new donors.Creating a donor-centric experience puts donors at the heart of everything you do and say. Use this approach online as well as in person. Solicit your donor’s opinion, create new ways for them to connect with you, and watch their loyalty grow.Gone are the days of passive donors who write a check and disappear. Today’s donors want to be actively included in your work. Thanks to your digital toolkit and technology such as Network for Good’s donor management system, there’s no reason not to give them the experience they crave. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Newbuildings Drive Ocean Yields Earnings Up

first_imgzoom The delivery of another five newbuilding vessels during the third quarter of 2016 has pushed up the revenues of Norwegian ship-owner Ocean Yield ASA to USD 76.2 million for the period from USD 65.3 million reported in the third quarter of 2015.During the quarter the company expanded its fleet with the container vessels MSC Diane, MSC Ingy and MSC Eloane, the chemical tanker Navig8 Topaz, and the LR2 product tanker Navig8 Supreme, all of which are chartered out long-term.In addition, the car carrier Höegh Trapper and the product tanker Navig8 Steadfast contributed with full quarter earnings, as these two vessels were delivered during the second quarter of 2016.The company’s net profit after tax for the three months increased to USD 32.7 million from USD 22.7 million seen in the corresponding quarter of 2015.Total revenues for the nine-month period from January to September 2016 increased to USD 212.4 million from USD 191.1 million reported in the same period of 2016, while the net profit also grew to USD 190.8 million from USD 167.6 million for the respective periods.In September, Ocean Yield agreed to acquire two 45,000 dwt IMO II chemical carriers, built in 2013, for a consideration of USD 35 million per vessel in combination with 12-year “hell and high water” bareboat charters to Navig8 Ltd.Navig8 Group has certain options to acquire the vessels during the charter period, with the first option exercisable after five years.last_img read more

Alberta spending more but saving more Highlights from the fiscal update

first_imgEDMONTON – Alberta Finance Minister Joe Ceci released the third-quarter fiscal update Wednesday showing the province on track for a $9.1-billion deficit when the budget year ends March 31 — $1.4 billion lower than expected. Here are some other highlights from the update:— The province is expected to take in an extra $1.9 billion in revenue this year for a total of $46.9 billion.— Spending is going up to $55.9 billion, about $1 billion more than projected in last spring’s budget.— Crude oil royalties to bring in $883 million, almost double what was expected.— Revenue from bitumen royalties to be $2.4 billion, about $188 million less than projected.— Personal income tax revenue expected to be $10.9 billion, $322 million less than expected.— Corporate income tax to generate $3.9 billion, about $66 million less than budget.— Capital plan spending forecast to be $9.2 billion, in line with the budget.— The unemployment rate was projected at 7.6 per cent at budget, but is now pegged at 6.8 per cent.— Of the 90,000 new full-time jobs created in the last year, most are in the oil and manufacturing sectors.— Debt for capital and operating expenses is forecast to reach $41.7 billion — about 12.4 per cent of GDP — with debt servicing costs at $1.4 billion.last_img read more