Jaguars in strong position

first_img SCOREBOARD Chanderpaul and captain Leon Johnson posted 66 for the second wicket as the Jaguars recovered from a shaky start. Johnson made 42 before he was caught behind by Carlton Baugh Jr off the bowling of leg-spinner Damion Jacobs. The other wicket to fall was that of Vishaul Singh, who was run out for 17. Young Chanderpaul, whose father is a substitute for the encounter, has so far batted for 189 minutes and has faced 149 balls. Play will resume today at 10 a.m. AT BEAUSEJOUR: WINDWARD ISLANDS VOLCANOES 306 (Shane Shillingford 64, Andre Fletcher 63, Mervyn Mathew 48 not out; Imran Khan 3-100, Narsingh Deonarine 2-29, Uthman Mohammed 2-51). TRINIDAD RED FORCE 153 for two (Yannic Cariah 58 not out, Narsingh Deonarine 58 not out; Kevin McClean 2-37). AT KENSINGTON OVAL: BARBADOS PRIDE 368 (Roston Chase 136 not out, Jonathan Carter 54, Kevin Stoute 41; Gavin Tonge 4-71, Sherwin Peters 3-36, Nelson Boland 2-82). LEEWARD ISLANDS HURRICANES 170 (Sherwin Peters 44; Ashley Nurse 5-65, Miguel Cummins 4-18). SHAKY START JAGUARS 1st Innings 189 SCORPIONS 1st Innings (overnight 63 for four) A. McCarthy lbw b Permaul 27 T. Lambert lbw b Permaul 18 +C. Baugh Jr b Jacobs 5 R. Powell c Johnson b Permaul 13 N. Miller c Singh b Motie 7 S. Cottrell lbw b Jacobs 8 M. Mindley not out 6 Extras (lb4, w1, nb13) 18 TOTAL (all out, 67.5 overs) 146 Fall of wickets: 1-0, 2-40, 3-59, 4-63, 5-89, 6-97, 7-118, 8-128, 9-135, 10-146. Bowling: Reifer 11-3-37-1 (nb2), Joseph 11-0-42-0 (nb11), Barnwell 5-1-10-1, Permaul 22.5-14-25-5 (w1), Motie 11-5-18-1, Jacobs 7-2-10-2. JAGUARS 2nd Innings T. Chanderpaul not out 39 A. Fudadin lbw b Mindley 9 *L. Johnson c wkp Baugh b Jacobs 42 V. Singh run out 17 R. Reifer not out 12 Extras (lb5, nb9) 14 TOTAL (3 wkts, 47 overs) 133 Fall of wickets: 1-17, 2-83, 3-111. Bowling: Cottrell 4-0-18-0 (nb1), Mindley 9-1-37-1 (nb7), Jacobs 12-2-25-1 (1), Miller 6-1-13-0, Campbell 8-3-16-0, Powell 8-0-19-0. Toss: Scorpions. Umpires: Jacqueline Williams, Peter Nero. The Guyana Jaguars are in a strong position to force a victory over the Jamaica Scorpions in their top-of-the-table WICB First-Class Championship clash at Sabina Park. Guided by an undefeated knock of 39 from young opener Tagenarine Chanderpaul, the son of Shivnarine Chanderpaul, Guyana were 133 for three at the close of yesterday’s second day. They now have an overall lead of 176, having made 189 in their first innings. The Scorpions made 146 in their first innings. Resuming on 63 for four with Andre McCarthy, not out on eight, and former captain Tamar Lambert, yet to face a ball, Jamaica were undermined by spinner Veerasammy Permaul. The short left-hander, varying his spin and flight to telling effect, claimed an impressive five for 25 off 22.5 overs. Off-spinner Steven Jacobs, two for 10, was next best, while lanky 20-year-old left-arm spinner Gudakesh Motie, playing in his first season, extended his leading wicket-taker tally to 29 with one for 18. McCarthy, whose alliance with Lambert yielded 26 runs before he was adjudged leg before wicket to Permaul, topscored for the Scorpions with 27. Lambert was also dismissed leg before wicket by Permaul after making a painstaking 18 off 109 balls in 129 minutes. Devon Thomas, with 30 on the first day, emerged as the innings’ highest scorer.last_img read more

REFUSE COMPANY FINED €12,000 FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY FAILURES

first_imgA leading Donegal refuse collection company has been fined €12,000 for failing to comply with health and safety standards.Ferry’s RefuseInspectors from the Health and Safety Authority called to the headquarters of Ferry Refuse Collection Ltd in Rossbracken, Manorcunningham. The inspection followed an incident in which one of their lorries had been involved in an accident in which a three year old boy was killed in Letterkenny in 2010.Ferry Refuse director Jim Ferry pleaded guilty to the breaches on behalf of the company.HSA Inspector William Gaffney called to the company’s premises and asked to see the firm’s Safety Statement under the Health and Safety Act of 2005.The act ensures that companies are identifying hazards and carrying out risk assessment.Mr Gaffney told Letterkenny Circuit Court that he was concerned about the reversing of bin lorries under the Safety Statement given to him by Ferrys.He said that across the country the HSA had encountered a number of fatalities or young and elderly people who were struck by reversing vehicles.He said there was a process which companies follow which enabled them to put controls in place to prevent deaths because of reversing vehicles.They included control measures including cameras, engineering barriers to prevent people being dragged under vehicles and audio reverse warnings.The court heard that Ferrys had no previous convictions under the Health and Safety Act.Judge John O’Hagan said sometimes it takes a tragic accident to bring a failure that may or may not be there.“It is easy to examine it afterwards and realise that something is wrong,” he said.Judge O’Hagan fined Ferry’s Refuse Collection €12,000.REFUSE COMPANY FINED €12,000 FOR HEALTH AND SAFETY FAILURES was last modified: October 30th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Ferry Refuse CollectionHealth and Safety Authoritymanorcunninghamplead guiltylast_img read more

The Cures Are Inside You

first_img(Visited 12 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0 Your body has the means to repair itself, if the right cells get into the right places.A nose for repair:  Medical Xpress reported that a man with a severed spinal cord—an injury thought to be irreparable—has recovered partial sensation and movement of his limbs again.  The secret: transplanted cells from his nose!  This is astonishing; it offers hope for quadriplegics some day.Treating patients with a complete spinal cord injury (SCI), the condition in which no motor or sensory function is preserved in the spinal segments below the level of the injury, has generally been unsuccessful. This is because no treatment methods have been able to regenerate the severed spinal nerves across the injured area. Now, doctors in Poland and scientists from England may have restored some function and sensory sensation to a 38 year-old man who had sustained a traumatic transection (severing) of the spinal cord in the upper vertabral level Th9. By removing one of his olfactory bulbs, where the sense of smell resides, and transplanting his own olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) and olfactory nerve fibroblasts (ONFs) into the damaged area along with a nerve “bridge” constructed between the two stumps of the damage spinal column, they have seen some voluntary limb function and sensation recovery over a 19 month follow-up.The BBC News has a video of the patient, Darek Fidyka, walking slowly with the aid of a frame; he said it’s “like you were born again.”Update 10/23/14:  Medical Xpress update says the patient is not only walking, but can dress and undress himself and get into bed without help.  Darek, age 40, described his progress with tears in his eyes.  The doctors are now seeking new patients for the life-changing treatment.Diabetes cure?  A new stem cell recipe offers hope for diabetics, Science Magazine reported.  It appears that the stem cells could be embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells; either way, the stem cells appear able to create the pancreatic beta cells necessary to produce insulin.  Tests with mice have cured them of diabetes.  “The diabetes research community has been waiting for ages for this type of breakthrough,” one researcher said.  Human treatments are probably years away, though.The all-healing eye:  Could the cure for blindness be right in front of your eyeballs?  Medical Xpress says that stem cells found in the cornea show hope for restoring sight to the blind.  “Scientists at the University of Southampton have discovered that a region on the front surface of the eye harbours special stem cells that could treat blinding eye conditions,” the article begins; these cells are found “in a narrow gap lying between the transparent cornea and white sclera.”  Macular degeneration is one of the diseases that may be treatable with these stem cells.Professor Andrew Lotery, of the University of Southampton and a Consultant Ophthalmologist at Southampton General Hospital led the study. He comments: “These cells are readily accessible, and they have surprising plasticity, which makes them an attractive cell resource for future therapies. This would help avoid complications with rejection or contamination because the cells taken from the eye would be returned to the same patient. More research is now needed to develop this approach before these cells are used in patients.”Another good thing: these cells are found in old people’s eyes, too, “and can be cultured even from the corneal limbus of 97 year olds.”  This offers hope of treatment for both old and young from their own eyeballs.Wait; there’s more:  These are just a few examples of a burgeoning movement to find healing cells within the body.  Stem cells have been found in the esophagus (Science Daily), possibly available to treat throat conditions and cancer.  Stem cells in the brain (Science Daily) appear to have an “unexpected role” in regenerating lost neurons, a repair long thought impossible.  And stem cells in placentas (Science Daily) might one day treat multiple sclerosis.  Clinical trials so far show this is safe.Update 10/23/14: Another story on Medical Xpress says that researchers at Washington University in St. Louis have reprogrammed mouse skin cells directly into brain cells, without having to go through the stem cell stage.  This could herald future treatments for Huntington’s Disease and other brain disorders.This is all wonderful news, but it raises a question: if these cells are there, why don’t they fix things without our help?  Did the Creator install repair tools in us that don’t work?  Here are some possible answers: (1) maybe they do more than we know, and we just aren’t aware of it.  More importantly, (2) there’s been a lot of degradation since the Fall.  A Biblical creation view would expect that the curse of sin that brought death broke a lot of things that were intended to promote immortality.  We see that salamanders can regrow lost limbs.  Maybe that’s a hint of what could have been, and will some day be, on a restored world for the righteous.  In the meantime, God has given us the ability to learn about how things work so that we can help one another.  The “good” stem cells (adult cells) show promise to bring back some of that lost repair capability, without having to kill an embryo to do it.  More power to these researchers!  Let the FDA not delay unnecessarily.  You and I know people who could really use these “miracle” treatments.last_img read more

Natural Selection Is Not Predictable

first_imgEvery once in awhile, biologists argue over whether evolution is predictable. The latest flap over stick insects sticks up for predictability, but flops.An international group of scientists, publishing in the journal Science, studied stick insects—those long, skinny walking insects that try to blend in with plants by mimicking twigs. In their paper, “Natural selection and the predictability of evolution in Timema stick insects,” they do their best to estimate the trajectory of these bugs. Laura Zahn, however, in a summary of the paper in the same issue of Science, has this to say:Evolution results from expected effects, such as selection driving alleles toward fixation, and stochastic effects, such as unusual environmental variation and genetic drift. To determine the potential to predict evolutionary change, Nosil et al. examined three naturally occurring morphs of stick insects (see the Perspective by Reznick and Travis). They wanted to determine which selective parameters could be used to foresee changes, despite varying environmental conditions. One morph fit a model of negative frequency-dependent selection, likely owing to predation, but changes in other morph frequencies remained unpredictable. Thus, for specific cases, we can forecast short-term changes within populations, but evolution is more difficult to predict when it involves a balance between multiple selective factors and uncertainty in environmental conditions.According to Zach Gompert at Utah State University, one of the authors, the predictability is hardly surprising: brown stick insects would be found on brown plants, and green stick insects would be found on green plants. The reason is that birds can more easily see the out-of-place morphs and eat them. This explains why out-of-place insects would be missing, but says little about the arrival of the camouflaged species. A USU press release says that the team analyzed 25 years’ worth of data to try to figure out if evolution is predictable.“With the green versus green-striped morphs, the cause of selection was simple and well understood facilitation of predictability,” Gompert says. “In contrast, with the melanistic morph, natural selection was more complex and tied to variation in weather and climate, making it harder to predict from past patterns of change.”The scientists compared their results to better known studies, including Darwin’s finches and the scarlet tiger moth, both of which were also not very predictable.“Our findings support previous discoveries and suggest evolution of morph frequencies in these stick insects is indeed a result of selection,” Gompert says. “They also suggest poor predictability of environmental variation and how it affects selection, rather than random evolutionary processes, might be the main limits on predicting evolution.”While we can use the past to predict change, he says, we’re constrained by our lack of knowledge of the future and complex ecological processes that contribute to change.c. Brett Miller. Used by permission.It’s hard to characterize any of this data support for evolution being predictable. They’re basically saying, ‘evolution is predictable except when it isn’t.’ Reznick and Travis sum up the results:Evolution is like population dynamics because evolutionary change over time can be governed by multiple factors, the relative influence of which vary over time. Nosil et al. used a series of observational data taken over 25 years on natural populations in combination with experiments to show that in one case, evolution can be predicted very well, but in another, it cannot. More generally, they show that without deep biological knowledge, we cannot understand either past or future, much less predict the future from the past.The problem is not just with stick insects. It extends to all of biology:Questionable predictability is not specific to stick insects. Nosil et al. analyzed data sets for other long-term studies of evolution in various species, including Galapagos finches and the peppered moth, and show that they also offer low temporal predictability. In these cases, the likely cause is also multiple forms of selection the strength of which varies over time.Interesting that they would present finches and peppered moths, both of which are “icons of evolution” featured in the list by Jonathan Wells, yet say they were subject to ‘multiple forms of selection.’ Why not simple ‘natural selection’ that strikes so many evolutionists as intuitively obvious? Now, we find, things are not so obvious after all. It’s complicated to predict even one thing on which natural selection might act:These results show that an iconic example of a simple trait subjected to a single agent of strong selection is actually much more complicated. Similar lessons have been taught by other seemingly simple phenomena. For example, the complex ways in which known agents of selection on the color polymorphism of Cepaea snails meant that “each population is subject to a unique explanation”. This is in stark contrast to studies of microbial, viral, and immune system selection, for which evolution seems to be highly predictable. Why this is the case, when it is not so in organisms such as stick insects and others, is a new challenge for evolutionary biologists.So the environment is unpredictable, selection is unpredictable, and mutations are clearly random. Adding three random factors together does not improve on randomness. After 158 years of Darwinian evolution, what has been accomplished to improve scientific understanding other than to say, “Stuff happens”?We like to periodically back up our claim that Darwinism reduces to the Stuff Happens Law. It explains everything; it explains nothing. This is how a stupid idea can put on invisible royal robes and masquerade as an emperor of understanding. Look at these proofs of the Stuff Happens Law we presented earlier. Don’t you feel wiser knowing them?Why the Stuff Happens Law is ScientificIt is reductive: all events can be reduced to this law.It makes predictions: Stuff will happen.It is universal: Stuff always happens.It is normative, not just descriptive: Given matter in motion, stuff must happen.It is falsifiable: If nothing happens, the law has been disproved.It is practical: If something happens, you know you will find stuff around.Corollaries can be derived from it: e.g., Stuff happens at the worst possible time, Bad stuff happens to good people, Murphy’s Law, etc.Impressed?  Darwin’s laws of nature are about as helpful to the understanding of nature as the Stuff Happens Law. Your science might be healthier with a bit of Cole’s Law (i.e., thinly sliced cabbage). (Visited 606 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Cape Town pupils reap a healthy meal

first_imgThe garden includes 40 different varietals of vegetables and herbs – aubergine, tomato, spinach, leeks, cabbage, broccoli, beetroot, rosemary, thyme, basil and many more.In 2013 a study by the African Food Security Urban Network found that 12 million South Africans are food insecure. This in a country that is generally food secure.FOOD SECURITYSouth Africa’s Vision 2030, better known as the National Development Plan, identified food security as an important target in meeting the objectives of the NDP.A project in Cape Town funded by Woolworths MySchool MyVillage MyPlanet fund is creating food security for a group of pupils in Observatory and Salt River. The edible garden planted at Observatory Junior School will produce 10 kg’s of fresh vegetables daily, allowing the 1 500 pupils at Dryden Primary School, Mary-Kihn Primary and Observatory Junior School to enjoy a healthy fresh meal.Helene Brand, MySchool’s CSI Manager, explained that the Salt River/ Observatory area was home to many households unable to provide a packed lunch. A secondary benefit she pointed out, “The edible garden at Observatory Junior School is our contribution towards giving more learners access to fresh food and a living garden where they can learn how to grow food and take responsibility for the upkeep of the garden.”THE GARDENThe garden at Observatory Primary is 400 square meters and includes 40 different varietals of vegetables and herbs – aubergine, tomato, spinach, leeks, cabbage, broccoli, beetroot, rosemary, thyme, basil and many more.Harvested produce is shared between all three schools, and is the base for the healthy lunch provided to learners every day. All three schools will also use the garden as an educational resource centre, actively involving learners in managing the garden. They will plant and harvest what they’ve grown, giving them a lifelong skill.Andy Clark, head of transformation at Woolworths Financial Services, said: “We’ve worked with all three schools through our participation in the Community of Learning Principals and the Partners for Possibility initiative and wanted to continue supporting them, so they can continue on their journey to be more sustainable and independent. They are run by highly committed staff and are motivated to participate in initiatives that will benefit their learners.“We are hoping to roll out more gardens at schools in the area, contributing to the communities in which we operate.”YOU REAP WHAT YOU SOWMore than half of Urban Harvest, the company that established the garden, 250 edible garden projects are based at schools in the greater Cape Town area. They seed gardens and help maintain and train people until they are self-sustainable.Explaining their philosophy Urban Harvest’s Ben Getz said: “The edible garden teaches learners that ‘you reap what you sow’. In the garden hard work pays off in many ways and the learners gain a greater sense of responsibility.“They also gain a sensitivity to and an appreciation for quiet, meditative, slow time when weeding or feeding the garden. They learn about keeping space neat and organised and a respect for nature and its lessons.”FETSA TLALAIn 2013 the Minister of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries, Tina Joemat-Pettersson launched Fetsa Tlala – an initiative aimed at improving household food security and stimulating sustainable job creation in the poorest districts of the country.This initiative ensures that underutilised agricultural land is put under production to increase local access to food.Fetsa Tlala will be financed through, amongst others, the Comprehensive Agriculture Support Programme (CASP). Allocations to provinces will be dedicated to food production, either crop or livestock production. More inclination, however, is towards the production of staple food such as maize, beans, wheat, sunflower, ground nuts and potatoes.CASP is the Department of Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries’ premier support programme and is funded through the Division of Revenue Act.last_img read more