4 questions to ask before checking the box

first_imgA few years ago, Bonny Wolf told a great story on NPR that goes something like this:In Chicago, a friend cuts off the end of roast beef before she cooks it. She does it because her mother does it. Her mother does it because her grandmother did it. So one day, the friend asks her grandmother why for years she has cut the end off the roast beef. The reason? Her grandmother says, “because my pan is too small.”I love this story because it tells us so much of how humans think. We often do as we have always done out of tradition or habit or imitation without questioning why. We move within our personal frames of reference, over and over, back and forth, until our ways are ingrained and unquestioned.Established nonprofits and companies create cultures that inadvertently lock in this dynamic. It is a very hard thing to resist the comfort of checking the same boxes without even asking how they got there. Each of my children went through a phase where they asked “why?” about every last thing. It has passed. Things get familiar and they don’t feel the need to pose the question. I think familiarity is one of the biggest barriers to innovation. It’s why we pay for fresh eyes – like consultants. – to ask “why?”In the spirit of rejecting the familiar frame we’re given, here are four questions to ask yourself before you check the same old box:1. Why did we start doing this activity?2. What underlying purpose does this activity serve?3. If it’s because of problem, is there a way to solve its root cause and prevent even needing to do the activity in the first place?4.If it’s because of an opportunity, is there a way to go bigger?The box may not be needed after all. There may be better ways to spend your time.last_img read more

Just Released: Updated Digital Giving Index

first_imgThe latest release of Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index provides a snapshot of online giving for the first half of this year. This update looks at $71 million in donations to 20,000 charities on Network for Good’s online donation platform from January to June 2013. Check out the full infographic below, or visit Network for Good to view the index and all of our previous updates. Thanks to our friends at Event 360 for partnering with us to analyze this data.last_img

PLOS Collection Explores Measurement Challenges in Expanding Coverage of MNCH Interventions

first_imgPosted on May 8, 2013March 8, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we noted last week, PLOS Medicine launched a new collection on May 7, Measuring Coverage in Maternal, Newborn and Child Health.The collection compiles evidence related to tools and indicators for collecting high quality evidence to expand coverage and improving the quality of care for key health interventions.About the collection:Measuring Coverage in Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, a PLOS Collection, presents innovative assessments of the validity of measuring population coverage for interventions in this field. Coverage indicators are widely used to assess whether interventions are reaching women and children in low- and middle-income countries, particularly through population-based household surveys. This collection of original research articles and reviews shows that while some indicators can be measured accurately, others may not provide valid results and therefore need further investigation and development.Highlights of the “Measuring Coverage” collection include two articles that address approaches for strengthening quality of maternal health services: “Validating Women’s Self-Report of Emergency Cesarean Sections in Ghana and the Dominican Republic,” and Testing the Validity of Women’s Self-Report of Key Maternal and Newborn Health Interventions during the Peripartum Period in Mozambique.”The collection also includes reviews key determining and interpreting inequalities in coverage and discussing  new findings, strategies and recommendations for action.For more, watch video of the May 7 launch event at the National Press Club, or visit Impatient Optimists to read a blog post by Miriam Claeson and Wendy Prosser of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The MHTF is Pleased to Announce the Launch of the MHTF Quarterly

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 1, 2013August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is excited to announce the launch of the first issue of our newsletter, the MHTF Quarterly.  Each issue of the Quarterly will highlight critical issue in maternal health, compiling resources, including new and important research, multimedia and news. For the first issue, the Quarterly focuses on malaria in pregnancy.From the Quarterly:Despite encouraging progress, coverage of malaria control efforts among pregnant women remains low. Malaria in pregnancy continues to be a substantial contributor to maternal and infant mortality and morbidity in malaria-endemic regions.Malaria in pregnancy programming is at a critical juncture. Important gains have been made in malaria control, but without continued efforts, the gains achieved may quickly erode.Given the existing synergies and overlap between the malaria and maternal health communities, several opportunities exist to collaborate more effectively. These areas of overlap include the target population (pregnant women), common health outcomes (maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity), and a shared delivery mechanism (the antenatal care platform).To receive the Quarterly or any of our other features, including the biweekly MH Buzz, by email, please sign up using our online form.Share this:last_img read more

Manifesto for Maternal Health: In-Country Perspective From the White Ribbon Alliance Tanzania

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on April 24, 2014November 4, 2016By: Rose Mlay, National Coordinator, The White Ribbon Alliance TanzaniaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Throughout my career as a midwife, I am all too familiar with the challenge of women arriving too late to the hospital to give birth. Over and over again, I have attended to women who had traveled for days to reach care. It is so heart breaking to know that these women’s lives could be saved if only they could reach quality professional care faster. We, at the White Ribbon Alliance, have advocated strongly over the years to our government in Tanzania to focus on maternal and newborn health, and great promises have been made! Now, we are faced with the challenge of making sure these promises are delivered. And we are working hard on that front!In recognition of the one-year anniversary of the publication of the Manifesto for Maternal Health, I’d like to take this opportunity to share some of our recent efforts to ensure that promises to women and newborns are kept.Just last year the White Ribbon Alliance Tanzania brought together national leaders engaged in maternal and newborn health ranging from the media, government, non-governmental organizations, and professional associations to set out a strategy for holding the government of Tanzania accountable for delivering on commitments made to our women and newborns. More specifically, we collectively set out a plan for holding the government accountable on promises to provide comprehensive emergency obstetric care (CEmONC) in at least half of all health centers by 2015. Together, we concluded to focus our efforts on the commitment to CEmONC because we listened to our citizens who have asked for these services to be closer to their homes. In addition, we know that the majority of the 24 women who die every day in childbirth die due to the lack of access to quality emergency care.In order to make our case, we knew we would need strong evidence to show the government just how off track their promises are, so we carried out a full facility assessment in 10 government-run facilities in Rukwa region. We engaged with community leaders, media and district officials as we moved through the region. Rukwa is beautiful with its rolling hills and great lakes, but it is a treacherous journey through the dirt tracks to get to rural health centers, with many being so remote that they are out of reach of telephone signals.As we gathered the data, we found that for a population of 1 million people, and over 10 health centers throughout the district, there was not a single health center that was providing the level of care that the government had promised.According to plan, we shared the evidence with the district government teams, and we pushed the district leadership to budget adequately for emergency obstetric care. In the meantime, we also set up meetings with national leaders and the Parliamentary Safe Motherhood Group to make sure emergency obstetric care is budgeted for adequately in the 2014-2015 budget cycle.We also made this film about the situation in Rukwa which Dr. Jasper Nduasinde, our White Ribbon Alliance focal person from the region took to the United Nations General Assembly to get global attention on the gap between promises and implementation.We called on our politicians to act. The Safe Motherhood Group in Parliament is working to get all politicians to sign a petition to the government to prioritize this issue.We called for a meeting with the Prime Minister. We spoke for an hour and a half on what could be done now to change this critical situation. He promised to take action.We also made this film about Elvina Makongolo, the midwife in Mtowisa who works tirelessly to save women’s lives.As we move to make these critical changes happen, we are faced with very sad news that motivates us even more. Shortly after this film was made with Elvina, the teacher of her grandchildren died in childbirth. Leah Mgaya died because Mtowisa health center does not have a blood bank. In the maternity ward of the health center ,a big refrigerator stands tall but the electricity to power it is missing. The closest blood supply is 100 km away at the regional hospital, reached only by a 4×4 vehicle due to the rough terrain.Leah’s husband, Cloud Kissi, said: ‘My wife has left a big gap in my life and she has left three children without a mother. It has left me with trauma as every time I see a woman carrying a baby I feel that if my wife could have survived, she could have been carrying a baby like the one I am seeing. I am quite sure that if we had a good operating theater, availability of safe blood and a reliable ambulance, we would have surely saved my wife’s life.’We continue to hear the personal accounts of husbands losing their wives, children losing their mothers, families losing their aunties, sisters and nieces and, in Leah’s case, a community losing their teacher. Citizens want change and they are pushing for it.In Rukwa alone, over 16 thousand citizens have signed a petition pushing the district officials and their MP to prioritize a budget for CEmONC.Recently, on White Ribbon Day in Rukwa, the Minister of Health spoke on behalf of the Prime Minister to say that this budget must be prioritized across the country.We now believe that the Prime Minister has become this campaigns’ greatest ally! And we know that our President Kikwete cares about the women of our nation. He has committed greatly to preventing these tragic deaths. But we cannot let up until women can access emergency life saving care near their homes. It is their right.As critical decisions are being made on budget allocation for 2014-2015, we are urging our leaders to listen to the citizens of our nation and budget adequately for comprehensive emergency obstetric and newborn care.If you would like to share your in-country story with us, please email Natalie Ramm or join the conversation on Facebook and Twitter.Share this:last_img read more

Over 28,000 Deaths in the First Day of Life in Bangladesh Reminds the Urgency of MNH Services Integration

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 6, 2014June 23, 2017By: Mohammod Shahidullah, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neonatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical UniversityClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of the Maternal and Newborn Integration Blog Series, which shares themes of and reactions to the “Integration of Maternal and Newborn Health: In Pursuit of Quality” technical meetingA new mother and her six-day-old baby receive a postnatal check up at the new government clinic in Badulpur, Habijganj, Bangladesh. Photo: CJ Clarke/Save the ChildrenThe continuum of care has become a rallying call to reduce the maternal deaths, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and child deaths. Continuity of care is necessary throughout the lifecycle (adolescence, pregnancy, childbirth, the postnatal period, and childhood) and also between places of caregiving (including households and communities, outpatient and outreach services, and clinical-care settings). Within the continuum, all women should have access to care during pregnancy and childbirth, and all babies should be able to grow into children who survive and thrive.Unfortunately in the modern era of medical science, the program efforts addressing the health of mothers and newborns are often planned, managed, and delivered separately; though, from a biological perspective, maternal and newborn health are intimately linked.Integration of maternal and newborn health is an important approach to avoid separation between a mother and her newborn baby, places of service delivery, or at any event of health services. A persistent divide between training, programs, service delivery, monitoring, and quality improvement systems on maternal and newborn health limits effectiveness to improve outcomes. But it is evident that at the public health level, even with scarce human and financial resources, integrated service packages can maximize the efficiency for health services.In the last two decades Bangladesh has demonstrated extraordinary progress in reducing maternal and child deaths, but unfortunately, newborn mortality declined in a much slower pace and reduction of stillbirths was not even on the agenda. Fortunately, the country recently prioritized newborn survival and incorporated some priority interventions to reduce neonatal death. Improved delivery care services became one of the key strategies for improving child survival in addition to overall development of the health service delivery system.The following newborn-specific interventions are prioritized to achieve the commitment of ending preventable child deaths by 2035:Ensure essential newborn care, including neonatal resuscitation and application of chlorhexidine in the umbilical cordIntroduce and promote kangaroo mother care (KMC) for premature and low birth weight infantsEnsure proper management of newborn infection with antibiotics at the primary care levelsEstablish specialized newborn care unit at the sub-district and district levelEnsuring delivery by skilled birth attendants at the community levels and establishing an effective referral linkage to ensure continuum of care from community clinics to the sub-district, district and higher level hospitals—which can provide round the clock emergency obstetric and newborn care—are actions incorporated in the declaration. These give a clear indication of the government vision on integrated approaches to improve maternal and newborn health.Intra-partum complication, prematurity-related complications and newborn sepsis are the major causes of newborn death is Bangladesh. Without integration of maternal and newborn health we cannot reduce mortality especially due to the fact that intra-partum complications and prematurity-related complications together cause 67% of all newborn deaths in the country. Bangladesh recently scaled up the Helping Babies Breathe initiative and that is a unique example of integration of maternal and newborn health.Every year in the first day of life, 28,100 newborns of Bangladesh die indicating the importance of integration of maternal and newborn services in pursuit of quality of care.This post originally appeared on the Healthy Newborn Network Blog and has been lightly edited.Share this:last_img read more

Women, Girls and Universal Health Coverage: Who Is Accountable?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 14, 2015December 7, 2016By: Belkis Giorgis, Global Technical Lead for Gender, Management Sciences for Health (MSH); Fabio Castaño, Global Technical Lead for Family Planning and Reproductive Health, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of the Woman-Centered Universal Health Coverage Series, hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force and USAID|TRAction, which discusses the importance of utilizing a woman-centered agenda to operationalize universal health coverage.Who is accountable for the young woman dying during childbirth in a hospital in Lusaka, Zambia? For the woman in a health center in Bugiri in Uganda? For the girl child in a rural home in Uttar Pradesh, India? In a shanty town in Tegucigalpa, Honduras? Who is accountable for the women and adolescent girls in a thousand places everywhere?The burden of ensuring safe delivery does not fall solely on the shoulders of women and girls, but falls on all of us. Whether we are policymakers, service providers, development workers, husbands, fathers or mothers-in-law, we can all make a difference. It is our responsibility to do so.  As a society, we owe it to women to ensure they have a safe delivery and access to family planning information and services.Complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among women and female adolescents in their reproductive years in low- and middle-income countries. Both family and cultural structures, as well as the health system, fail many women and girls, especially those living in rural and hard-to-reach regions. This is evidenced by the father who married off his daughter when she was a child, the husband who would not let his wife go to a health facility and a lack of affordable, accessible, quality facility-based care. These factors—in addition to ill-equipped clinics, poorly trained health workers and cultural perceptions that childbirth does not require skilled care—contribute to the high maternal mortality rates in developing countries.We have the responsibility to hold policymakers accountable for reforming health systems in pursuit of universal health coverage (UHC), which will transform populations’ health and save women’s and children’s lives. UHC shifts the burden of health costs from women to society and in a small way, shows our gratitude to women for giving life. UHC recognizes that women should not be neglected when they give birth and that women should not die while giving life. The responsibility of caring for women during delivery is a societal debt paid partly by eliminating the obstacles to safe, skilled and respectful care during childbirth.Because women often bear the greatest share of the economic costs associated with their families’ health, UHC can also have a proportionally greater effect on women by dramatically reducing their out-of-pocket costs and offering financial protection.Low-income countries must start with modest but high-impact services. A core package of services for reproductive, maternal and child health driven by community health workers provides the logical cornerstone of UHC plans.Family planning should be non-negotiable and included in even the most frugal UHC plans. Everyone has the right to access family planning services, which includes the ability to choose when and how to utilize a variety of options. Fulfilling the unmet need for family planning alone would prevent 150,000 maternal deaths and 640,000 newborn deaths globally each year.Through UHC, health systems can be strengthened to ensure that frontline health workers are in the right place at the right time to deliver the right services effectively.Who is accountable? We are. UHC that delivers for women and girls in the post-2015 era requires us all to be accountable. We must embrace this responsibility to accompany, support and empower women and adolescent girls on this journey fraught with both barriers and possibilities.Share this:last_img read more

Happy National Philanthropy Day

first_imgFor over 30 years, November 15 has been a day set aside to celebrate the spirit of philanthropy and the dedicated individuals who work in philanthropic circles. National Philanthropy Day honors the tradition of caring for each other and improving the world.From large foundations to small nonprofits, your impact on communities across the United States is undeniable. Without you, countless animals would go unrescued, children would lose afterschool programming, artistic organizations would fold, and the rights of citizens would be in danger.Imagine that for a minute. What would this world be like without philanthropy?Simply put, philanthropy is “goodwill to fellow members of the human race.” (Thanks, Merriam Webster!) Whether you’re a donor or a nonprofit staffer (or both), that desire to improve a situation and care for others is more than just a fleeting emotion. It’s a way of life. It motivates you in good times and lifts you up in bad.Celebrate PhilanthropyLooking for ways to celebrate National Philanthropy Day this year? Here are three quick, easy things you can do to spread the love.Email—Use your donor management system to send a dedicated email blast to your donors thanking them for their support. Get out the white board or construction paper and write out a “thank you” message. Include a photo of yourself and/or your entire team along with your homemade sign. Share the image on social, too.Social Media—Include posts on social media celebrating your donors and volunteers. They make you’re work possible. Include photos from fundraising receptions and community events. Feature a few of your top donors and long-time volunteers throughout the day. Tag them if possible for added appreciation. Use the hashtag #NationalPhilanthropyDay to join the online conversation.Website—Add a homepage banner image to your website that celebrates National Philanthropy Day and an uplifting call to action. Link to your online donation page. Share the image on social, too.Philanthropy is the backbone of who we are. Whether it’s a financial donation or the gift of time, it feels good to do good. Nonprofits bring people together, unite and inspire us, and improve our daily life. Through conversation, education, events, and performances, your work keeps us connected.And it’s what we love about you. It’s why we do what we do, too.Network for Good believes in the power of small nonprofits. We believe in providing useful resources and a donor management system that improves efficiency. Our goal is to free you up to do the good you do in your community. We’re proud to serve you and your mission.From all of us at Network for Good…Happy National Philanthropy Day!last_img read more

Happy Valentine’s Day: Donor Love Infographic

first_imgLooking for a new way to show your donors some love this Valentine’s Day? Look no further! Let our Donor Love infographic show you the way. We’re here to help you with all your nonprofit fundraising and marketing needs, including:Campaigns & AppealsThank YousResults & ReportsDonor RelationsCommunicationsCheck out our donor love infographic today. Plus, hover over each image for a special surprise!Donor Love InfographicRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img

Use Our New Organizations Search!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 14, 2015August 8, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)We are excited to present a new feature on the MHTF website: the organizations search.We have created a database of maternal health organizations to help foster connections and build partnerships between groups working on similar issues. There are many diverse organizations around the world working on maternal health, and this new tool will help you connect with them!The organizations database grew out of the maternal health mapping project, part of phase 1 of the MHTF. As more and more organizations added themselves to the map, it became difficult to find anyone! The new search-based interface enables easy access to the information.We want to hear from you! Test out the new organizations search feature and let us know what you think. If your organization is not included in the search, but you would like it to be, please fill out the information form. We would be happy to add you!Share this:last_img read more

15 New Jobs in Maternal Newborn Health!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 15, 2016July 28, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in maternal, newborn or reproductive health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaCommunications Director: Population Services International (PSI); Dar-Es-Salaam, TanzaniaCountry Director – Liberia: Jhpiego; LiberiaQuality Improvement Practitioner: Jacaranda Health; Nairobi, KenyaSenior Technical Advisor – Maternal Health and Family Planning: Jhpiego; MaliAsiaClinical Trainers: EngenderHealth; Bihar, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (Delivery Efficiency, Mechanisms, & Financing): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning and Evaluation (Health Coverage, Quality, & Delivery): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaEuropeResearch Fellow in Reproductive & Maternal Health: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; London, EnglandNorth AmericaCommunications and Development Manager: Global Health Media; Waitsfield, VTCommunications Coordinator: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Communications Specialist: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Policy Communications Officer, Advocacy & Public Policy: PATH; Washington, D.C.Program Officer – Zika: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore, MDSpecialist, Communication and Advocacy, Global Health: Save the Children; Washington, D.C.Technical Writer: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C. Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.Share this:last_img read more

Misoprostol for Postpartum Hemorrhage: Empowering Health Workers to Save Lives

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 5, 2017January 6, 2017By: Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In Senegal, approximately 1,800 women lose their lives every year while giving birth. The major cause of these deaths is uncontrolled bleeding after childbirth, or postpartum hemorrhage (PPH). More than half of Senegalese women live in rural areas and have limited access to well-equipped health facilities that can prevent or treat many of these deaths. Many women give birth, attended by matrones or volunteer birth attendants, in maternity huts. Recognized as essential health care providers by their communities, matrones have some formal training and are now registered with the Ministry of Health (MoH).To effectively prevent or treat PPH, women need access to uterus-contracting drugs, or uterotonics, such as oxytocin or misoprostol. The recommended uterotonic, injectable oxytocin, requires cold storage and technical skill to administer. Misoprostol is a safe and effective alternative where oxytocin isn’t available or feasible; it doesn’t need refrigeration and is easy to use—particularly important features for use in remote, rural areas.From 2013 to 2014, the Government of Senegal’s Direction of Reproductive Health and Child Survival, in partnership with USAID and Gynuity Health Projects, examined the use of misoprostol (600 mcg oral) or oxytocin (10 UI) via Uniject® for prevention of PPH at the community level. Matrones were trained to assist with deliveries and administer the designated intervention. According to the study, both misoprostol and oxytocin in Uniject® were equally effective and safe in preventing PPH, and matrones posted at the health huts were capable of administering the medicine they were assigned.As a result of the study’s findings, the National Health Commission approved the use of misoprostol for PPH in health huts across the country and granted matrones the authority to dispense medication and attend deliveries. Prior to the release of the study findings, the Ministry of Health did not consider matrones sufficiently qualified to administer life-saving interventions. They were only authorized to intervene in cases of imminent birth; otherwise, they referred women in labor to higher levels of care.Senegal’s recent commitment to empowering matrones and supporting community-based distribution of misoprostol for PPH prevention was codified in the National Strategic Community Health Plan (Plan National Stratégique de Santé Communautaire, 2014-2018). The government registered misoprostol for PPH prevention and treatment, making misoprostol commercially available in 2013, and included it in the update of the National Essential Medicines List in 2013.Senegal’s National Health Plan now officially recognizes matrones as a cadre of health provider in the country’s health system and the critical role they play in providing care at the community level. Matrones and other primary level staff from all 14 regions of Senegal participated in a national training so that they can effectively contribute to the roll-out and expansion of the national program for PPH prevention. Ongoing supportive supervision and close monitoring of the program is essential to ensure that matrones have the support they need to provide essential, life-saving care to women in their communities.This post originally appeared on Rights & Realities, a blog by the FCI Program at MSH.Share this:last_img read more

Improving Health Facility Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) for Enhanced Delivery of Quality Maternal and Newborn Health Services in Kenya

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 22, 2018March 23, 2018By: Abdi Hassan, WASH Specialist, UNICEF Kenya; Lutomia Mangala, Health Specialist, UNICEF KenyaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Efforts for improving maternal and newborn health (MNH) often focus on implementing specific measures of maternity care, strengthening health systems and increasing women’s demand for giving birth in health care facilities—sometimes with little or no attention paid to the conditions of the places in which women give birth. Among these conditions is the availability—or lack—of clean water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities.Inadequate access to clean waterA 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) rapid assessment of WASH coverage in health care facilities in 54 low- and middle-income countries found that 38% of these facilities lacked access to an improved water source, or one that is likely to be protected from outside contamination. Furthermore, 35% did not have water and soap for handwashing, and 19% did not have improved sanitation, or a system that hygienically separates human excreta from human contact. The percentage of facilities without improved water rose to 42% when only countries in the African region were considered.This is consistent with the situation in some parts of Kenya, where a 2016 multi country analysis of WASH in the childbirth environment found only 18% of women delivered in an environment with improved water. UNICEF in Kenya has been supporting the government of Kenya over the past year to improve WASH conditions in select health facilities in the MNH high-burden districts of Kakamega, Homa Bay, Turkana, Garissa and Nairobi.A clean water, sanitation and energy planTo identify health facilities in great need of improved WASH facilities, UNICEF in partnership with United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) supported the government in undertaking a comprehensive assessment of health facilities to determine their WASH birth environment. One example is Homa Bay County’s Nyandiwa Health Centre, which—despite being on the shores of the second largest fresh water lake by area in the world—had no reliable supply of clean water. Nyandiwa was among 50 priority health facilities in the five districts that were eventually selected for a clean water and sanitation improvement plan.The improvements at Nyandiwa entailed rehabilitation and upgrading of existing water supply system to provide sustained WASH services to the health facility. An automatic water pump on the shores of Lake Victoria pumps water from the lake to raised water tanks with a combined capacity of 20,000 liters. These act as a reservoir and are connected through a piped system to various water delivery points within the health center, including the delivery room.A UNICEF-supported green energy project has also installed a solar system which provides reliable energy to the water pumping equipment, as well as lighting to the sanitation and hygiene facilities. Health facility managers and workers were trained on hygiene promotion as well as on operation and maintenance of the water system for sustained delivery of WASH services. For example, the health center has trained and assigned a Community Health Assistant to conduct routine operation and maintenance of the WASH facilities. The health center also conducts regular cleaning of the rain water harvesting tanks which provide clean drinking water for the staff and patients.Impact on maternal newborn healthAt health facilities, hygiene workers deliver messages promoting safe waste disposal, handwashing at critical times and drinking safe water through sessions with mothers during routine maternal, newborn and child health visits as well as through posters and fliers. Although there is a dearth of rigorous research quantifying the impact of WASH on MNH outcomes, available evidence, based on biological plausibility, suggests WASH interventions could improve MNH. It is therefore hoped the improvement in WASH in Nyandiwa and the other 49 health facilities will contribute to improvements in MNH service utilisation, and ultimately better health outcomes for mothers and newborns. Governments should develop plans and frameworks to continue improving WASH in health facilities and ensure that adequate financial resources are available to realize these goals.—Join the conversation on World Water Day by using #WorldWaterDay.Read about giving birth without clean water.Photo Credit: Eric Sakwa, UNOPS Engineer, KenyaShare this:last_img read more

Newbuildings Drive Ocean Yields Earnings Up

first_imgzoom The delivery of another five newbuilding vessels during the third quarter of 2016 has pushed up the revenues of Norwegian ship-owner Ocean Yield ASA to USD 76.2 million for the period from USD 65.3 million reported in the third quarter of 2015.During the quarter the company expanded its fleet with the container vessels MSC Diane, MSC Ingy and MSC Eloane, the chemical tanker Navig8 Topaz, and the LR2 product tanker Navig8 Supreme, all of which are chartered out long-term.In addition, the car carrier Höegh Trapper and the product tanker Navig8 Steadfast contributed with full quarter earnings, as these two vessels were delivered during the second quarter of 2016.The company’s net profit after tax for the three months increased to USD 32.7 million from USD 22.7 million seen in the corresponding quarter of 2015.Total revenues for the nine-month period from January to September 2016 increased to USD 212.4 million from USD 191.1 million reported in the same period of 2016, while the net profit also grew to USD 190.8 million from USD 167.6 million for the respective periods.In September, Ocean Yield agreed to acquire two 45,000 dwt IMO II chemical carriers, built in 2013, for a consideration of USD 35 million per vessel in combination with 12-year “hell and high water” bareboat charters to Navig8 Ltd.Navig8 Group has certain options to acquire the vessels during the charter period, with the first option exercisable after five years.last_img read more

Canadian Natural reports 961M Q1 profit up from 583M a year ago

first_imgDaily production averaged 1,035,212 barrels of oil equivalent, down from 1,123,546 in the first quarter of 2018.On an adjusted basis, Canadian Natural says it earned 70 cents per diluted share from operations compared with 71 cents per diluted share in the same quarter last year.Analysts on average had expected a profit of 51 cents per share and revenue of $5.25 billion, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon. CALGARY, A.B. – Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. reported a first-quarter profit of $961 million, up from $583 million in the same quarter last year, as it benefited from higher prices due in part to Alberta’s mandatory production curtailments.The oilsands producer says the profit amounted to 80 cents per diluted share for the quarter ended March 31, compared with a profit of 47 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue totalled nearly $5.25 billion, down from $5.47 billion in the first quarter of last year.last_img read more

Worst intersections in Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – ICBC has released their numbers for the worst intersections in Fort St. John.Data posted by ICBC is as of March 31, 2018, and includes all crash types including casualty crashes resulting in injury or fatality and property damage accidents.#100 crashes – 100 St & Hwy 97N & Turning lane#91 crashes – 100 Ave & Hwy 97N & Old Fort Road & Turning lane#76 crashes – 100 Ave & 100 St#67 crashes – 93 Ave & 96 St & 96A St#63 crashes – 108 St & 109 St & Hwy 97 N & Turning lane#60 crashes – 100 St & 93 AveTo view the crash scale; CLICK HERElast_img

Pearl of the Caucasus

first_imgAzerbaijan is a country of unmatched culture and exotic history. It hosts an array of customs, traditions and fine cuisines – a place which will satisfy expectations of the most sophisticated gastronomists – and finally, it is the country of Caucasian hospitality and amiability. Situated at the eastern side of Transcaucasia (or South Caucasus) on the shores of the Caspian Sea, Azerbaijan is the largest country of the South Caucasus. Baku is its capital and largest city. Also Read – Oman – Beauty with an addressAzerbaijan is often referred to as the ‘Land of Fire’. It is known that a majority of those residing in this territory before the Common Era were fire worshippers. Since then, the country has preserved the ancient evidence of that era: cave paintings, statues of gods and ancient temples. Two of the most vivid examples of this heritage are the temple of fire-worshippers (Ateshgah) at Surakhani near Baku and Yanardag, translated as the “burning mountain”. These lands were considered sacred for centuries and throughout history, they were worshipped by the followers of Zoroastrianism, Hinduism and Sikhism. Also Read – CANADA: A traveller’s delightHistorically a part of the Great Silk Road and situated at the crossroads of the geopolitical, economic and cultural interests of many nations and civilisations, Azerbaijan has, since ancient times, aroused the interests of great minds, scientists, travellers and historians. References to this amazing land, located on the western coast of the Caspian Sea and in the eastern part of the South Caucasus, can be found in the ancient writings of Herodotus, Strabo and Claudius Ptolemy. Azerbaijan has an amazing historical and cultural heritage with more than 7,500 natural, archeological, architectural and historical monuments. Cave drawings at Gobustan, Momine-Khatun and Garabaghlar mausoleums, the Palace of Sheki Khans, the Maiden Tower, the castles of Absheron, medieval manuscripts decorated with magnificent miniature paintings, antique rugs and works of literature, arts and sculpture – all of this is just a small part of the country’s rich and priceless heritage. Holidays are on the rise in Azerbaijan owing to its cosmopolitan culture and ease of connectivity. More importantly, Azerbaijani people are known for their warmth and hospitality; from hotel staff going above and beyond to help you locate excursions to sharing a hot meal and swapping stories. If you are looking to be pampered alongside exploring hidden gems in a secure and safe destination – Azerbaijan is the place. As Azerbaijan sits on the crossroads of Europe and Asia, this diamond in the rough appears rugged on the edges with miles of untouched natural beauty. Gabala is a perfect getaway retreat, far from the hustle and bustle of congested cities, where you can rejuvenate yourself. Waterfalls, large forests and the magnificent Caucasian mountains make Gabala an ideal place for the brave heart. You can also take part in various outdoor activities – quad biking, hiking, skating, horse rides etc. ARCHITECTURAL DELIGHTSThe buildings of Azerbaijan are a glorious mixture of styles, reflecting the cultural shifts and changing trends of hundreds of years. From minarets to mosaics, medieval to modern, every corner reveals something different and distinct. Momine Khatun Mausoleum The dramatic, semi-desert mountain landscapes of the Nahkchivan Autonomous Republic stretch from brooding Mt Aghri to the historic town of Ordubad. This stunning 25-meter high decagon of red brick and turquoise enameled tiles is the finest example of the Nakhchivan architectural tradition. Palace of the Shirvanshahs Located in Baku, The Palace of the Shirvanshahs is a 15th century palace built by the Shirvanshahs and described by UNESCO as “one of the pearls of Azerbaijan’s architecture”.The complex was built gradually, over the course of centuries. Haydar Aliyev Centre World-famous architect Zaha Hadid designed the crown jewel of Azerbaijan’s architecture in central Baku. It flows seamlessly from the plaza around it, joining the exterior and the interior to represent the inclusion of everyone in a place of shared ideas. A museum, exhibition halls and an auditorium are housed together in this single eternally flowing shape. Ganja Bottle House This astonishing two-storey house in Azerbaijan’s second city was completed in 1967 by Ibrahim Jafarov, and is made of 48,000 glass bottles of different colours and sizes – making it one of the greatest architectural marvels. Sheki Khan Palace The country’s craftsmen are famed for their shebeke – a mosaic of coloured glass set in a wooden latticework and assembled without nails or glue. The round-form shebeke of Sheki Khan Palace is unique, making it a real visual feast! Heydar Aliyev Centre This astonishing structure was also designed by Zaha Hadid, the first woman to ever receive the Pritzker award, architecture’s highest honor. It’s unique wave-like design earns the title as Central Baku’s crown jewel of architecture. The centre boasts of the incredible diversity and energy visible in Azerbaijani art. FEAST FOR THE SENSES Azerbaijan’s unique geography and location have resulted in a cuisine influenced not just by its own varied ingredients, but by the tastes of many people travelling along the Silk Road – making it full of surprising flavours and combinations! Plov A local favourite, plov is rice served with meat, fish or fruit. The saffron-flavoured rice is cooked with lots of fresh herbs, vegetables, dried fruits and more. Some cooking books offer over 40 different versions of plov. The dish is so highly regarded that there is even an International Plov Festival to celebrate this hearty meal. In every Azerbaijani holiday, whether it is the celebration of springtime (Novruz Bayram), or a special occasion such as a birthday or any other important family event, plov remains an integral part. Pakhlava Pakhlava is a festive dish made for Novruz – the traditional celebration of the coming of spring. The classic pakhlava is cut into diamonds and is sure to be relished by gourmands. Caviar and Fish Caspian fish has its own special taste and is best served with narsherab (pomegranate sauce). The most famous fish in Azerbaijan is the Beluga sturgeon. Known as one of the world’s most expensive delicacies, the Beluga sturgeon doesn’t reach its reproductive age till it is about 20 years old. Drinks There is extensive archeological information suggesting that the people inhabiting the territory of present-day Azerbaijan had developed viticulture. Some relevant artefacts related to the ancient wine production in modern Azerbaijan (as bowls, recipients etc.) have been excavated from the ruins of medieval towns and cities. Azerbaijan’s viticulturists developed many valuable varieties each of which were adapted to the soil and climate conditions in different parts of the country. The varied terrain of its fast-improving wineries across the country results in myriad of flavours and bouquets. The most famous is the Caspian Coast, Fireland Vineyards, Yarimada, Hacihetemli, Savalan, Hillside, and Agsu pomegranate wine.last_img read more

Chris May sparks Ohio State mens lacrosse from the faceoff X

Senior midfielder Chris May (left) is widely considered the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterWhile snow continues to fall as March begins on Ohio State’s campus, in the lacrosse world, all signs point to May.Chris May, that is, who is now the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.The Buckeyes fell just short of a win against Marquette on Sunday, losing 10-9, and while the team went 1-1 on the weekend in Louisville, Ky., May went 32 of 39 on the weekend in faceoffs, earning the Big Ten Specialist of the Week for the third time this season. And though he is more successful than ever, the graduate transfer has a “pretty crazy story” about his journey from Georgetown University to his first season with OSU.“My senior year, I was only in pads for a few practices,” he said. “I was coming off a shoulder injury when I tore my Achilles tendon … Once I got hurt, I started focusing on my future and graduate school. I’ve been a Buckeye fan my whole life … I realized I only had one shot to do this, so I really worked hard.”At Georgetown, he only stepped onto the field for 22 games, but now after just six with the Buckeyes, May has won 75 percent of his faceoffs and snagged 60 ground balls, thriving in a position named aptly for the precise skill set it requires.“It’s a unique position,” OSU assistant coach Jamison Koesterer said. “It’s mental, just hearing the whistle, finding a rhythm between what he hears and what he needs to execute physically … It definitely takes athleticism, but it also takes savvy, a little bit of poise and IQ to understand and anticipate where the ball might come out.”May’s success at the midfield X results not only from a consistent process, but also an unwavering support from his team, enabling him to aid the offense in taking the ball to the net.“A lot goes into it, but I just try to get a good reaction off the whistle and fight for the ball,” May said. “We’ve got a lot of great offensive players. A lot of guys who can score, but they can’t score if they don’t have the ball … But it’s a group effort, we have a great unit. It’s a great dynamic.”Although May is the new kid on the block with the Buckeyes, former high school teammate and OSU senior captain David Planning said he enjoys feeding off May’s familiar energy.“He’s such an easy guy to play with,” Planning said. “He knows what his job is. It makes it a lot easier on the offense and the defense.”With a lacrosse resume stronger than most of his younger OSU teammates, May assimilated quickly. He assumed a leadership role, but admitted his teammates teach him a few things too.“Being older than a lot of the guys, I feel like I have more experience,” May said. “I’m trying to be a role model for the younger guys, but I’m still learning a lot from the older guys too.”And while May continues to fine-tune his craft at the X, the rest of the Buckeyes look to learn from the loss at Marquette, revisiting the drawing board but “hungry” to return to the field.“We’re getting back to the basics on both sides of the ball,” coach Nick Myers said. “There’s always a desire coming off a loss wanting to look at what went wrong and how to fix it. Tuesday, we practiced in the pouring rain for two hours and these guys didn’t blink an eye … It’s a long wait till Saturday whenever you lose, so they’re excited.”The Buckeyes stand at the threshold of an uphill climb, facing three top 20 opponents before heading into conference play, but Planning said the team isn’t focusing on the opposition.“Our focus is on us,” Planning said. “We want to dictate the tempo and the style of play, and that starts with us.”With that goal in mind, Planning, May and the rest of the Buckeyes are set to move to Ohio Stadium on March 7 to take on Hofstra at 1 p.m. read more

Marcus Rashford reaches 100 Premier League games

first_imgAfter his crucial performance against Leicester City last Sunday, Marcus Rashford reached 100 Premier League games at only 21 years of age.Manchester United has Marcus Rashford as one of the most exciting young talents who is doing everything to be part of the best players in the world, the lad has already played his 100th Premier League match and his stats are simply incredible.A report from Diario AS suggests that Real Madrid is eager to sign the English striker next summer but there is a fat chance that the Red Devils will let him go, Rashford is considered one of the cornerstones of the club’s project for the future.Since he started an impressive career in the domestic competition, Marcus has already scored 26 goals and provided 15 assists to his teammates.His numbers in all competitions go even further than that, with 42 goals and 26 assists since Dutch manager Louis van Gaal gave him the opportunity to play his very first minutes for the squad.The most recent performances are the reason several clubs have shown interest in signing Marcus Rashford, but the club is already looking to improve his contract and there was a reason the club decided to give him the number ’10’ jersey at such an early age.Marcus Rashford’s overall Premier League record (this season in brackets):100 Apps (22)26 Goals (9)15 Assists (7)#MUFC #MUFC pic.twitter.com/GkcNCuzT0D— RedReveal (@RedReveal) February 4, 2019The type of footballer that Marcus Rashford has become invites us to think about the attacking force that the England National Team will have this year, as they will line him up alongside the likes of skipper Harry Kane, and young sensation Jadon Sancho with Raheem Sterling on both flanks.Manager Gareth Southgate has already been following the latest performances from Rashford and his plans completely involve him on the starting XI, he is the type of player who can decide a very complicated match such as the upcoming UEFA Nations League that is coming against the Netherlands in June.Rashford has all the qualities of a forward who can play in all attacking positions on the pitch, he can’t be limited to a certain spot because that will prevent him from showcasing his abilities to their full extent.His time at Manchester United has given us a better idea of the player he is slowly becoming, Rashford’s connection with Paul Pogba has also helped him immensely as he has transformed into a more regular decisive player since manager Jose Mourinho left the squad.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.Youngest players to reach 100 PL appearances for Manchester United 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 Ryan Giggs (21y, 74d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Marcus Rashford (21y, 95d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Wayne Rooney (21y, 201d)🇵🇹 Cristiano Ronaldo (21y, 224d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Phil Neville (22y, 108d)— Football Factly (@FootballFactly) February 3, 2019Rashford is also the latest of a long list of historic players who made their debut under manager Louis van Gaal, he has everything to be considered amongst a very prestigious list of players who have been very successful such as Xavi Hernandez, Carles Puyol, Andres Iniesta, Toni Kroos, Patrick Kluivert, Bastian Schweinsteiger, among others.Rashford has the potential of becoming one of the most complete offensive players that the Dutch manager ever had the honour of helping with their debut as professionals, it appears that he will get very far with Manchester United or any other club where he decides to play if he ever chooses to do it.Just to put things under perspective, let’s look at other great players at the same age of Rashford.The England international reached 100 matches at 21 years and 95 days old, legendary Ryan Giggs accomplished the same milestone at 21 years and 74 years of age.Cristiano Ronaldo had only scored 19 goals and provided 16 assists at the same age.Wayne Rooney is the player who comes closest to Rashford’s numbers, as the English legend scored 24 goals on his first 100 Premier League appearances.Rashford vs Ronaldo after 100 PL games… 👀 pic.twitter.com/B7Yo5DqZOb— TheFootballRepublic (@TheFootballRep) February 4, 2019How many goals will Marcus Rashford score throughout his Premier League career? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more