Governor and First Lady Wolf Join Health Professionals, Advocates, & Legislators to Denounce Senate Bill 3

first_img February 17, 2017 Governor and First Lady Wolf Join Health Professionals, Advocates, & Legislators to Denounce Senate Bill 3 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Press Release,  Public Health,  Women’s Rights Abington, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf today joined women’s health advocates and medical professionals, along with Representative Madeleine Dean, Senator Art Haywood, Representative Steve McCarter, and Representative Mary Jo Daley to denounce the fast-tracking of Senate Bill 3 which would eliminate a woman’s right to make choices about her own health care in consultation with her doctor.“I want to thank the members of the General Assembly who have stood against this bill. Let me be clear: Should Senate Bill 3 reach my desk, I will veto it,” Governor Wolf said. “I am not threatening a veto out of partisanship, or due to some political back and forth. I am promising this veto to demonstrate that Pennsylvania will not play games with women’s healthcare in our Commonwealth. Simply put, this legislation severely limits women’s ability to make informed and timely decisions about their own health care options. That is not the place of government.”“Senate Bill 3 is an unwise, unscientific, unvetted, and unconstitutional bill,” said Representative Madeleine Dean. “It is dangerous and is anti-woman, seeks to take both the choice and the decision making away from a woman, her doctor and her family—and bizarrely puts critical medical decisions in the hands of the Pennsylvania legislature.  All of this without so much as a hearing or consultation with experts and doctors.”Senate Bill 3 proposes the most extreme restrictions on abortion in the country. It would ban abortions after twenty weeks except in the rarest of circumstances, leaving no exceptions for rape, incest, health or tragic fetal anomalies. The bill would also ban one of the safest methods of second trimester abortions, putting women at risk and taking crucial decisions about their medical care out of the hands of their trusted medical providers.“This vote was based upon a bunch of quacks,” said Senator Art Haywood. “There’s no medical basis for the decisions a group of non-doctors have made. And they made this decision on behalf of Pennsylvania’s women without the input of those women or the doctors who serve them.”The Pennsylvania Senate recently passed the bill, despite bi-partisan opposition, through committee and the floor in just three days with limited debate and no expert witnesses or public hearings. The bill now awaits action by the House of Representatives, where a similar version passed last session.Governor and First Lady Wolf were joined today by women who have had to make devastating decisions about their pregnancies. If SB 3 were to be passed, women facing the same circumstances would be stripped of their right to make these personal, family decisions.“I am grateful for the one element of control I had in an otherwise powerless situation: the decision to end our pregnancy and with it our son’s pain and suffering,” said Erica Goldblatt Hyatt. “This is the paradox, I learned, of being a mother: in my case, loving my son so deeply that it meant choosing to say goodbye. Though that choice rests on my heart every day, I know it was the right one for our family, and I am grateful to live in a State where our Governor supports the rights of women like me to make it, autonomously, with those who know and love her best.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

Indiana’s new outdoor recreation five-year plan is available

first_imgStatewide—The latest in a long line of five-year plans to help determine the future public outdoor recreation needs of all Indiana residents and plan for that future is available from the Department of Natural Resources.Just as similar organizations in other states, the Indiana DNR is required to create a comprehensive state-level outdoor recreation plan every five years. This planning process keeps Indiana eligible to obtain funds from the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF) that DNR then re-grants to park boards in counties, townships, cities, and towns.The new 140-page Statewide Comprehensive Outdoor Recreation Plan (SCORP), which covers 2016-2020 and includes the 2021-2025 Indiana Trails Plan, can be downloaded here. The site also includes information on how the study is done.For more information, contact DNR Outdoor Recreation’s Greg Beilfuss at 317-232-4071 or gbeilfuss@dnr.IN.gov.last_img read more

Kelly Cross, women’s lacrosse player that crashed into Mount steps, no longer enrolled at SU

first_img Published on August 20, 2015 at 3:18 pm Contact Chris: cjlibona@syr.edu | @ChrisLibonati Kelly Cross, the women’s lacrosse player driving the car that hit the Mount Olympus steps in late March is no longer enrolled at Syracuse University, an SU Athletics spokeswoman confirmed.Cross, a junior midfielder, crashed a white Ford Explorer into four support poles, sending a newspaper box about 25 feet. The crash was reported at 2:27 a.m., and Cross checked into Upstate Hospital between 2:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m. The cause of the crash is still unknown. The morning of the crash, a DPS officer said Cross was lucky to be alive. The stairs closed temporarily for repairs, but eventually reopened.Four days after the crash, Cross was indefinitely suspended and did not play any games with SU after her suspension. She was not allowed to travel to with the team, but was allowed to practice.“Kids may make mistakes, but we still stick behind them and we don’t isolate them and throw them to the curb,” SU head coach Gary Gait said.Cross had started every game for the Orange until her crash and had been fourth on the team in goals (14), assists (six) and points (20) at the time of the crash. Cross’ sister, Julie Cross, had committed to play women’s lacrosse at SU, but it could not be confirmed whether she is still enrolled at SU. A freshman named Julie Cross is listed on Syracuse University’s directory, however.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textTwo calls to the Cross family have gone unanswered. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more