History of Vermont Printers Now Available

first_imgThe Lane Press, Inc. announced the availability of the book A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 – 2004. Published by Lane Press to recognize Vermont printers and to commemorate its 100th anniversary, the book features interviews of 20 prominent contributors to the states printing industry, a history of printing techniques, and the changing role of technology during this time. Putting ink on paper is one of the central acts of a civilized society, the book begins. For private messages, a pen will do. But for spreading public informationanything from advertising to sacred textsprinting has long been the medium that has joined the individuals in a culture.How important is printing to the Vermont economy? Today there are 119 commercial printing businesses that employ more than 3,600 people with sales of more than half a billion dollars.Authored by Chris Granstrom with oral histories by The Vermont Folklife Center and photography by Michael Sipe, the book is a compilation of stories and images that bring to life the important role printers play in the dissemination of information, our ideals, and the freedoms we enjoy as a result of the printing industry.In the preface of the book, Philip Drumheller, president of Lane Press, says that more than anything else, this is a people story. This is a story about families, fathers and sons, and a lot of great individuals, lively characters who make the story of printing in Vermont both appealing and engaging. The oral history interviews with noted printing professionals bring the printing history alive through the stories they tell.Rocky Stinehour, founder of Stinehour Press in Lunenburg, Vermont, spoke at length during his oral history interview about the role of technology in printing. Printing has always been a technologically driven business, right from the get-go. I mean, putting those scribes out of business that were making those beautiful handmade books. There were books long before printing came along, and beautiful books, and great books, but printing did something. Printing was a tool and it took pens out of the hands of the scribes and they had to start setting type. The technology may change, but the book remains.A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 2004 is available in hard and soft cover at www.lanepress.com(link is external).last_img read more

Peruvian Peace Corps Learns to Prevent Tropical Diseases

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo January 17, 2019 The Peruvian Armed Forces’ Joint Command (CCFFAA, in Spanish) concluded 2018 with the inauguration of a health education and prevention course for members of peacekeeping operations. The Tropical Diseases course, conducted with the support of the U.S. Embassy in Lima, gathered 60 units of the Peruvian, Colombian, and Salvadoran armed forces. The objective of the course was to analyze tropical diseases that threaten service members deployed in peacekeeping missions. The course also sought to provide better knowledge on how to prevent endemic infectious diseases, such as dengue, zika, yellow fever, hemorrhagic fevers, and monkeypox, among others, with greater emphasis on malaria. The course was taught with the support of the U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group and the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Institute for Medical Operations (DIMO). Four instructors taught the course under the leadership of U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jessica Cowden, chief of infectious disease programs. The loss of a Peruvian blue helmet deployed with the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA, in French) prompted the creation of the course. “It was a very tough lesson learned that warned us about the risks and, above all, how it was addressed,” Peruvian Navy Petty Officer Second Class Edsson Evaristo Alvarado, CCFFAA analyst on peacekeeping operations and course organizer, told Diálogo. “It was in 2014 in Africa, where ebola was taking its toll, so they treated [the blue helmet] as if it were that disease. He was quarantined, and instead of treating him for malaria, they treated him for ebola, and he died.” Preventing illnesses The five-day course was divided into two phases. During the initial theoretical phase, DIMO’s instructors shared their knowledge and experiences. They focused on preventing malaria, chemoprophylaxis—the use of medication to prevent a disease—severe malaria, malaria surveillance programs; and the history, transmission, and detection of the Ebola virus and monkeypox. Instructors also addressed diseases transmitted through food and the sanitary conditions of dining areas. With the topics covered, they sought to promote prevention among military personnel deployed in peacekeeping missions. “The idea is to prevent diseases, and doing research before going on a [peacekeeping] mission,” Peruvian Air Force Petty Officer Second Class Jacqueline Galarza López, who participated in the course before deploying to MINUSCA, told Diálogo. “We attend talks at the Peruvian Training and Instruction Center for Peacekeeping Operations, but in this seminar we saw instructions, experiences, and medical processes that take place upon return.” The second phase, the hands-on part, required students’ active participation to conduct malaria diagnostic tests and blood sample observation under microscopes, among other procedures. “The U.S. personnel taught us how to do the tests and how to immunize uniforms, and they gave us clothes for the contingent that’s about to travel,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Galarza. A benefit for the region In addition to the Peruvian units to be deployed in January or February of 2019 to join the peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, military health corps members also took part in the course. According to Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado, Colombian and Salvadoran personnel were invited to learn and share their experience. “We convened the medical personnel from military institutions who deal with health issues of the personnel that takes part in peacekeeping operations, the nurse that administers vaccines, the doctor who provides medical certificates, and those who deal with epidemic issues in each institution, among others,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado said. “Participants included personnel we offered to the UN who have already been accepted.” With its own experience in the field and the support of U.S. experts, Peru’s CCFFAA seeks to improve deployments and protect the health of its units in peacekeeping missions. When taught again, the course will be beneficial to regional partner nations that want to increase their participation in peacekeeping missions in countries prone to infectious diseases. “Most importantly, during the course we realized that we are pioneers in South America in teaching it,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado concluded. “We learned and presented new things, and we expect to cover more at the national level. The service member leaves, but it’s a human being who returns, potentially bringing back an epidemic element.”last_img read more

Tesla Market Cap Surpasses Daimler

first_imgTesla’s market value is now higher than DaimlerStep-by-step Tesla becomes bigger and bigger company, which sells more cars (and more of its other products too). It is reflected by the market capitalization (share price times the number of issued shares).Most recently, the value of Tesla exceeded the value of Daimler, despite Daimler being way bigger in terms of… everything – volume of sales, profits, history. However, not the size or current results are a determining factor in market cap.Market cap:Tesla – $63.18 billionDaimler – $61.27 billion The most important factor that influences share value is the belief of the future outcome. Tesla, as a technological company and biggest manufacturer of all-electric cars, is expected to grow strong in the future, which pulls the market value up.This is why from a market perspective Tesla can be more valuable than Daimler, Ford or BMW.Source: Google Finance, Electrek Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on December 5, 2018Categories Electric Vehicle News Tesla Now Worth More Than Ford Tesla Passes BMW In Market Cap To Become World’s #4 Most Valuable Automakercenter_img See Also Source: Electric Vehicle News EVTV: Jack Rickard Says Tesla Stock Will Hit $950last_img read more