Governor and First Lady Wolf Join Health Professionals, Advocates, & Legislators to Denounce Senate Bill 3

first_img February 17, 2017 Governor and First Lady Wolf Join Health Professionals, Advocates, & Legislators to Denounce Senate Bill 3 SHARE Email Facebook Twittercenter_img Press Release,  Public Health,  Women’s Rights Abington, PA – Governor Tom Wolf and First Lady Frances Wolf today joined women’s health advocates and medical professionals, along with Representative Madeleine Dean, Senator Art Haywood, Representative Steve McCarter, and Representative Mary Jo Daley to denounce the fast-tracking of Senate Bill 3 which would eliminate a woman’s right to make choices about her own health care in consultation with her doctor.“I want to thank the members of the General Assembly who have stood against this bill. Let me be clear: Should Senate Bill 3 reach my desk, I will veto it,” Governor Wolf said. “I am not threatening a veto out of partisanship, or due to some political back and forth. I am promising this veto to demonstrate that Pennsylvania will not play games with women’s healthcare in our Commonwealth. Simply put, this legislation severely limits women’s ability to make informed and timely decisions about their own health care options. That is not the place of government.”“Senate Bill 3 is an unwise, unscientific, unvetted, and unconstitutional bill,” said Representative Madeleine Dean. “It is dangerous and is anti-woman, seeks to take both the choice and the decision making away from a woman, her doctor and her family—and bizarrely puts critical medical decisions in the hands of the Pennsylvania legislature.  All of this without so much as a hearing or consultation with experts and doctors.”Senate Bill 3 proposes the most extreme restrictions on abortion in the country. It would ban abortions after twenty weeks except in the rarest of circumstances, leaving no exceptions for rape, incest, health or tragic fetal anomalies. The bill would also ban one of the safest methods of second trimester abortions, putting women at risk and taking crucial decisions about their medical care out of the hands of their trusted medical providers.“This vote was based upon a bunch of quacks,” said Senator Art Haywood. “There’s no medical basis for the decisions a group of non-doctors have made. And they made this decision on behalf of Pennsylvania’s women without the input of those women or the doctors who serve them.”The Pennsylvania Senate recently passed the bill, despite bi-partisan opposition, through committee and the floor in just three days with limited debate and no expert witnesses or public hearings. The bill now awaits action by the House of Representatives, where a similar version passed last session.Governor and First Lady Wolf were joined today by women who have had to make devastating decisions about their pregnancies. If SB 3 were to be passed, women facing the same circumstances would be stripped of their right to make these personal, family decisions.“I am grateful for the one element of control I had in an otherwise powerless situation: the decision to end our pregnancy and with it our son’s pain and suffering,” said Erica Goldblatt Hyatt. “This is the paradox, I learned, of being a mother: in my case, loving my son so deeply that it meant choosing to say goodbye. Though that choice rests on my heart every day, I know it was the right one for our family, and I am grateful to live in a State where our Governor supports the rights of women like me to make it, autonomously, with those who know and love her best.”Like Governor Tom Wolf on Facebook: Facebook.com/GovernorWolflast_img read more

AP2 reports highest-ever results, makes 53% on Chinese equities

first_imgEva Halvarsson, chief executive officer of AP2, said: “All asset classes had a positive return and in particular, the world’s equity markets developed positively.”The fund’s Swedish equity portfolio returned a total 30.2%, while the developed markets foreign equity portfolio generated 31.7%. Emerging markets equities produced 19.9%.“The return on Chinese A shares was the fund’s best asset class with an annual return of 52.6%,” Halvarsson said.Over the years, she noted, AP2 had developed “unique expertise” in analysing the pension system’s development and needs in the future, in order to be able to construct the portfolio that provided the most benefit for the pension system.“In 2019 we have further supplemented the analysis by including the risks that climate change poses to economic growth,” she said.In its sustainability report – published alongside the annual report – AP2 said that looking ahead, it would continue to develop the integration of climate risk into its overall asset-liability management analysis.It also said it aimed to identify the main climate risks and opportunities for more asset classes, sectors and geographies, as well as finding out what their time horizon was.Having invested in green bonds since 2008 and included the environmentally-linked debt as a separate asset class in its portfolio since 2015, AP2 said it had now decided to lift the strategic allocation to green bonds to 3%, or just over SEK11bn.“During the year, there was continued strong growth in the market, with more issues and more organisations and companies issuing green as well as social bonds,” the fund said in its sustainability report.At the end of December, AP2 said it had over SEK14bn invested in green and social bonds. The first of Sweden’s mighty pension buffer funds to unveil 2019 results has announced its highest-ever results, generating SEK53bn (€5bn) in a bumper equities year when its holding of Chinese A shares produced a 52.6% return.Gothenburg-based AP2 also revealed it had increased its strategic weighting to green bonds to 3% last year from 1%, and included climate risk in its overall return assumptions, which form the basis for the choice of strategic portfolio.The other three of the main four government funds designed to back the Swedish state pension, AP1, AP3 and AP4 – all located in Stockholm – have yet to report 2019 results.Overall, AP2 said it made a return after costs of 15.9% last year, with total assets growing to SEK381.3bn by the end of December.last_img read more