Warriors coach Steve Kerr, Shaq and David West engage in cheesy exchange on Twitter

first_imgOn Tuesday morning, the three war horses retreated to … “Yeah, just sitting back trying to recapture, a little of the glory yeahWell time slips away and leaves you with nothing, mister, but boring stories of …”— “Glory Days,” Bruce SpringsteenDavid West has been retired from the NBA for more than a year. Shaquille O’Neal last played in George W. Bush’s second term.Steve Kerr hung up his sneaks in 2003. But he has forged a second NBA career as a coach. A really successful coach.last_img

Jock to grace South African screens again

first_imgThe animated 3D Jock is the centralcharacter of the new film. (Image: Jock Animation) Jock as depicted on the cover of theclassic South African story. (Image: Kalahari.net) A Jock of the Bushveld route marker,which leads tourists along the trailhe and Fitzpatrick used to travel. MEDIA CONTACTS • Andy RiceJock Marketing+27 11 447 5236 / 5283 RELATED ARTICLES • SA-set sc-fi satire huge hit in US • Kruger park marks 100 years • SA short film makes festival finals • New Afrikaans film a hitJanine ErasmusSouth Africa’s beloved canine icon Jock of the Bushveld has again been immortalised on film, this time in an animated 3D version which, if director Duncan MacNeillie has his way, is set for international distribution.MacNeillie will travel to Los Angeles at the end of November 2010 to present the film to Hollywood film studios and independent distributors. With the recent successes of local films such as District 9 and Tsotsi paving the way, he hopes to wrap up an international distribution deal before he returns.MacNeillie knows Jock well. He directed the first film adaptation of the story, released in 1986 at the height of one of the most turbulent periods in South Africa’s history. It starred Jonathan Rands as Percy Fitzpatrick and boasted a soundtrack, composed by veteran Keith Hutchinson, which featured another South African icon, musician Johnny Clegg.Clegg’s theme song for the film, Great Heart, has become a national favourite and nowadays is a popular choice for inspiring South African sporting teams to glory. Great Heart does not feature on the new soundtrack, although Clegg is involved.Because the world was largely boycotting anything South African in the 1980s, overseas audiences were denied the chance to see a film that could hold its own against any Hollywood production of the day.Determined to see Jock get the global recognition he deserved, MacNeillie decided to try again when the time was right.Another version was made in 1995, without MacNeillie’s input – this one introduced an American character to enhance its global appeal, and also had a happier ending, which pleased foreign audiences, but didn’t sit well with South African cinemagoers.The right timeA few years ago the director felt that conditions were right for revisiting the story, and set up production company Jock Animation to bring his vision to life.The animated version follows the same story line as the live motion films, but this time around the animals get to tell the tale.Animation has given the producers more versatility, and in the new version viewers will get to know Jock’s mother Jess; dainty poodle Polly; Snarly the mongrel, Jock’s rival for Polly’s heart; George the baboon; Pezulu, a noisy rooster; and many more characters.In October Jock Animation confirmed the participation of Canadian superstar Bryan Adams as the spoken voice of Jock. Local actors include former radio show host Jeremy Mansfield, poet and presenter Bongani Nxumalo, and actors Sylvaine Strike, Terence Bridgett, Michael de Pinna and Michael Richards.MacNeillie also approached no less a figure than Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu, asking him to be the voice of the spiritual leader Tata. The Arch agreed and has already recorded his part, as has Adams.Marius Brouwer, who worked on the official Fifa 2010 World Cup album, composed the score and was in charge of music production until he fell ill in September. Keith Hutchinson has since stepped in to fill the gap.Adams, Clegg, local songbird Nianell and Craig Hinds of popular rock group Watershed have all worked on individual songs for the film.Andy Rice, head of the film’s publicity company Jock Marketing, introduced his Oscar-winning brother Sir Tim Rice to the film. The lyricist, famous for his work on The Lion King and Evita, was enchanted by the film, and contributed lyrics to the six main songs on the soundtrack.Production started in 2007 and is scheduled to wrap in December 2010, followed by the local release in March 2011. This date may change, depending on international distributors.Those who sobbed into their tissues at the end of the 1986 release will be comforted to know that the new adaptation also has a happier ending, which paves the way for a sequel.Family favouriteFor decades South African children have grown up with the true story of the brave Jock, a Staffordshire bull terrier with the heart of a lion, who roamed the South African bushveld with his owner Sir Percy Fitzpatrick in the late 19th century and became a legend in the process.Born in King Williams Town in the Eastern Cape, Fitzpatrick was the son of Irish immigrants. His father died in 1880, forcing the young man to abandon his studies to support his mother. The gold rush of the late 19th century was an attractive opportunity, and Fitzpatrick left home in 1884 to seek his fortune in the goldfields of the Eastern Transvaal, now Mpumalanga.Here he worked as a storeman, journalist and then transport rider, guiding heavily laden ox-wagons along the route from Lydenburg, known today as Mashishing, through Graskop and Barberton, to Lourenço Marques, which is now Maputo in Mozambique.On a trip in 1885 Fitzpatrick saved the runt of a litter of Staffordshire bull terrier pups from drowning – this little dog was to become his faithful companion and a great hero. The pair’s footsteps can still be traced by following the set of Jock of the Bushveld wayside markers, which are placed along the old Delagoa Bay route used by transport riders. Markers can be seen in places of interest such as Sabie, Pilgrim’s Rest, along the Malelane-Skukuza and Malelane-Crocodile Bridge roads, and Barberton.Many years later Fitzpatrick entertained his children with bedtime stories of his adventures with the loyal dog, and was eventually inspired to put pen to paper. The book, titled Jock of the Bushveld, was published in 1907 and has not been out of print since.Fitzpatrick eventually settled in Johannesburg and entered the corporate world, turning later to politics. A spell of activism between careers saw him arrested and tried for treason for his part in the Jameson Raid of 1896, which was meant to incite British expatriates to rise up against the South African Republic government of President Paul Kruger. He was sentenced to two years in prison but was released after just a few months.He received his knighthood in 1902 while serving as the British government’s official advisor on South African affairs. After the formation of the union of South Africa in 1910, Fitzpatrick became a member of parliament.He died in Uitenhage in today’s Eastern Cape province and is buried north of the town, near Addo, at a place called the LookOut. The site, which overlooks the Sundays River valley, is a national heritage monument.His name lives on not only in his classic book, but also in the Percy Fitzpatrick Institute of African Ornithology which celebrates its 50th anniversary in 2010, and the Percy Fitzpatrick Award which is awarded annually to the country’s best English children’s book.To buy Jock of the Bushveld, published by Maskew Miller Longman, go to Kalahari.net.last_img read more

Two can’t miss webinars: Dan Heath and Guy Kawasaki!

first_imgNetwork for Good has two amazing webinars coming up – and (as usual) they are free with registration.*Nonprofit 911: How to Get More Followers on Social Media w/ Guy KawasakiThursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. EasternWhy isn’t your hashtag everywhere? When’s the best time for a Facebook status update? What does it mean when someone +1’s you on Google +? How come no one liked your picture, story, update, tweet, share, friendship, etc? You might be caught a social media slump!Tune in Thursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear tech and social media expert Guy Kawasaki lead a free presentation giving nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via the most popular social media platforms.Register here.Nonprofit 911: The Decisive Organization: Building a Culture of Better Decision-MakingMonday, March 25 at 1 p.m. EasternBest-selling Switch author Dan Heath’s done it again! Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work hits shelves next week. He’s going to stop by and pre-release the most helpful decision-making practices to the Network for Good audience via a Nonprofit 911 webinar on Monday, the 25th at 1 p.m. Eastern. Join Dan Heath as he makes it easier for your organization to make that sound decision. Bonus: Dan will be giving away a free copy of his new book to 10 lucky nonprofits on the call.Register here.*If you can’t make the date for Guy Kawasaki, sign up anyway. You will get a recording of the webinar afterward! Dan Heath’s session is live only, so we won’t be sending recordings.last_img read more

5 Ways to Use Stories to Increase Donations

first_imgThere are infinite ways to tell your nonprofit stories, but do you know which ones will lead to more donations? Check out these great tips shared in our free webinar, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 2. Share stories on your blog.Blogging is a great way to grow your online presence, establish credibility, and increase your reach. You can highlight specific constituents, volunteers, staff, and board members—you can even let them write their own stories. Tying your blog to your website makes these testimonials, updates on upcoming events, and ongoing campaigns easy for visitors to access without receiving direct communication from you. 4. Turn donors into advocates with nurturing emails.Nurturing emails are a great way to consistently share your stories. Send welcome emails after a friend signs up for your blog, or deliver a series of emails to build anticipation once a guest signs up for an event. The goal is to familiarize people with your organization, explain how you’re being successful, describe what you want to accomplish, and share stories of successful fundraisers. Make what you’re doing human and relatable to inspire people to fundraise and advocate for your cause. 5. Revamp your annual report.After your annual report is published, do you know how many people are actually reading it? Chances are it’s not many! Because your annual report contains the proof, data, and impact of your mission, you should do everything possible to make people want to read it. Make it beautiful (forget endless columns of small black text), shareable (does it include great pictures and Twitter icons?), visual (do you have infographics and appealing charts to make your content easy to digest?), and accessible (is it easy to understand, and does it fit on your website?). Making your annual report more creative will encourage people to read it, share it, and donate in support of it!Want to learn more about how telling your stories can lead to better donor involvement and more money? Download the on-demand webinar presentation, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 3. Tie donor actions to numbers.This might not sound like a story, but trust us, it is! Close the loop for your supporters by letting them know exactly what their donation will give someone else. Will it mean two pairs of shoes, a warm meal, an immunization? Donors love to know where their money is going and what impact they’re making on someone’s life. Including a visual makes the story of a donation more compelling to a potential donor. Many organizations are hesitant to make a video; it can be expensive, time consuming, and technical. But it can also be easy and inspiring. Connect with your viewers by telling them an easy-to-follow short story that centers on just one or two people. Focus on the quality of the story and engaging your viewer, not on making a super-high-quality video. Your supporters know you’re not Hollywood, so your video doesn’t need to be as technically savvy. 1. Tell personal stories through video. last_img read more

Nonprofit Branding Done Right Raises More Money

first_imgWhen it comes to updating nonprofit branding, there can seem be more questions than answers. Questions like:Will rebranding increase donations?Will rebranding make it easier for us to convey our organization’s impact and value?Is now the time for us to rebrand?We finally get answers to these million-dollar questions in The Rebrand Effect: How Significant Communications Changes Help Nonprofits Raise More Money (free download here).This eBook from nonprofit communications agency Big Duck is based on the results of a national survey of 350 nonprofit organizations that rebranded within the last 10 years.For the study, Big Duck defines a comprehensive rebrand as developing or changing four or more of these elements:Brand strategyOrganizational nameTaglineLogoKey messagesElevator pitch.A limited rebrand includes three or fewer of these elements.Here are the highlights of this study and what they may mean for your organization:The Good News: Nonprofits that Rebrand Raise More Money.According to the study, most organizations invest in rebranding in hopes of connecting more quickly and firmly with individual donors and prospects. Statistics show those hopes are the reality for many organizations.Fifty percent of organizations surveyed reported revenue growth, with the greatest increase seen in individual giving. This success rate is particularly striking since many participating organizations were in the process or rebranding, or had done so within the last one to two years, so felt it was too early to assess the impact of those changes.Organizations that Comprehensively Rebrand See Greatest ROI.More than half (56%) of the organizations that completed a comprehensive rebrand saw revenue increase, compared to 41% of organizations that implemented limited rebranding.And the impact of comprehensive rebranding exceed revenue gains. The survey found that organizations making more comprehensive changes are likely to see these additional wins:Greater audience participation, from program registration to activism.Improved staff ability and confidence to communicate effectively about the organization, its impact, and value.More media coverage.Several Factors Influence Rebrand Results.The data shows that results stem from more than the rebrand itself. Organizations that rebrand with any or all of these elements already in place are far more likely to get to goal:New, clear organizational focus or strategic plan (within last 12 months)New leadershipStaff and leadership committed to advancing branding and communications changes.In other words, these factors lead to relevant and robust rebrands. If your organization has any or all of these success factors in place, rebranding may well deliver significant value! Dig into the full report from Big Duck to learn more about if, and how, rebranding done right is likely to move the needle for your fundraising efforts.Bonus: Nonprofit branding is important so don’t ignore it. Are you reflecting your brand in all aspects of your giving experience: Events, donation pages, emails, and peer-to-peer campaigns? If not, we can help. Talk to a rep to learn more.last_img read more

PLOS Collection Explores Measurement Challenges in Expanding Coverage of MNCH Interventions

first_imgPosted on May 8, 2013March 8, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As we noted last week, PLOS Medicine launched a new collection on May 7, Measuring Coverage in Maternal, Newborn and Child Health.The collection compiles evidence related to tools and indicators for collecting high quality evidence to expand coverage and improving the quality of care for key health interventions.About the collection:Measuring Coverage in Maternal, Newborn, and Child Health, a PLOS Collection, presents innovative assessments of the validity of measuring population coverage for interventions in this field. Coverage indicators are widely used to assess whether interventions are reaching women and children in low- and middle-income countries, particularly through population-based household surveys. This collection of original research articles and reviews shows that while some indicators can be measured accurately, others may not provide valid results and therefore need further investigation and development.Highlights of the “Measuring Coverage” collection include two articles that address approaches for strengthening quality of maternal health services: “Validating Women’s Self-Report of Emergency Cesarean Sections in Ghana and the Dominican Republic,” and Testing the Validity of Women’s Self-Report of Key Maternal and Newborn Health Interventions during the Peripartum Period in Mozambique.”The collection also includes reviews key determining and interpreting inequalities in coverage and discussing  new findings, strategies and recommendations for action.For more, watch video of the May 7 launch event at the National Press Club, or visit Impatient Optimists to read a blog post by Miriam Claeson and Wendy Prosser of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The MHTF is Pleased to Announce the Launch of the MHTF Quarterly

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 1, 2013August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is excited to announce the launch of the first issue of our newsletter, the MHTF Quarterly.  Each issue of the Quarterly will highlight critical issue in maternal health, compiling resources, including new and important research, multimedia and news. For the first issue, the Quarterly focuses on malaria in pregnancy.From the Quarterly:Despite encouraging progress, coverage of malaria control efforts among pregnant women remains low. Malaria in pregnancy continues to be a substantial contributor to maternal and infant mortality and morbidity in malaria-endemic regions.Malaria in pregnancy programming is at a critical juncture. Important gains have been made in malaria control, but without continued efforts, the gains achieved may quickly erode.Given the existing synergies and overlap between the malaria and maternal health communities, several opportunities exist to collaborate more effectively. These areas of overlap include the target population (pregnant women), common health outcomes (maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity), and a shared delivery mechanism (the antenatal care platform).To receive the Quarterly or any of our other features, including the biweekly MH Buzz, by email, please sign up using our online form.Share this:last_img read more

9 Ways to Save Lives Through Maternal and Newborn Health Integration

first_imgPosted on March 9, 2015October 27, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)At a standing room only event last week at The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, global experts gathered to discuss the need for, barriers to, and the way forward for maternal and newborn integration. But what is integration and why is it so desperately needed?Every year approximately 300,000 women and 5.5 million newborns, including stillborns, die needlessly. The causes of these deaths are often similar since the mother and her newborn are inextricably linked both socially and biologically.For the panel, Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits Across a Lifetime, Ana Langer, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force; Joy Riggs-Perla, Director of Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children; Alicia Yamin, Policy Director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights and Kirsten Gagnaire, Executive Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA), presented the health, rights, and technological advantages to integrating maternal and newborn health financing, policies, training, and service delivery.Why is integration important?A woman’s health before conception, during pregnancy, and after her baby is born has a direct impact on the health of her child and the rest of her family. “Biologically the health, the nutritional status, and the well-being of the mother in general strongly influence the chances of survival and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy, the newborn later and even older children,” shared Langer. Since a woman is the primary caretaker of her family, if her health suffers, everyone is affected.Recent research from Dr. Yamin quantifies this impact. In South Africa, Tanzania, Malawi, and Ethiopia, if a mother dies during pregnancy or childbirth, there is a 50-80% chance that her newborn will die before reaching his first birthday. The impact of the death of the mother also reached far into the future. When a mother dies there are higher rates of family dissolution; early drop out of school, especially for girls; and nutritional deficits.What are the challenges to integrating?Although it is easy to see how the health of the mother would directly affect the health of her fetus, newborn and children, integrated care is rarely seen. Maternal health, newborn health, and child health are siloed as separate initiatives across the health care spectrum: from the policy, donor, financing and monitoring levels to the academic, health system, program and NGO levels. But these problems are seen beyond the program and country level. These “challenges also happen at the global level, failing to provide an enabling environment for those changes at the country level to happen. So too often, we see that different initiatives are either targeted to mothers or to babies and don’t make a good enough effort to bring them closer together,” shared Langer.Divisions in providing maternal and newborn health include separate pre-service training in maternal and newborn health for health care workers, rare HIV-testing and treatment of an infant if the HIV-positive mom dies in childbirth and separate global initiatives, among many others. These persistent separations have created a dearth of evidence of how best to implement integrated maternal and newborn care.Key areas that remain segregated are ministries of health and data collection systems. Joy Riggs-Perla shared that “there’s often a separation [of maternal and newborn health] organizationally in a Ministry of Health… That can cause problems with program coordination. It can cause problems where one or the other gets more or less emphasis. And so that can actually lead to problems in service delivery.” In addition, Riggs-Perla addressed the crucial need to collect data on both mothers and newborns so that programs and health systems recognize and synchronize their approaches to improve health outcomes along the continuum of care. “I think the bottom line in all of this is that if people think about care from a client-centered perspective, or a client-oriented perspective, you naturally come to the continuum of care. And that helps solve some of these problems. Too many of our health services are organized at the convenience of the providers,” concluded Riggs-Perla.An additional barrier to integration may be societal discrimination. “Ultimately maternal mortality is the culmination of layers of structural, and discrimination, and exclusion that women face in society. And often women and children face or experience their poverty and marginalization through their context with indifferent and dysfunctional health systems,” shared Yamin.How to break silosIn order to provide comprehensive care that benefits both the woman and her child, current silos in maternal and newborn health need to dissolve.MAMA is working to bring integrated information to pregnant women and mothers precisely when they need it. Through mobile technology, both text and voice messages are used to provide timed and targeted information during pregnancy through their child’s third birthday. These messages are specific to the local context and language and include a wide range of information from nutrition during pregnancy and breastfeeding to cognitive development and immunizations for their children.Another programmatic example is from the TSHIP project in Nigeria, where misoprostol and chlorhexidine are now distributed together by community health workers: misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in women and chlorhexidine to prevent umbilical cord infection in newborns.The panel provided many potential solutions to the chasm in maternal and newborn health:Integrated national costed plans of action: “[Integration is] very, very difficult if it doesn’t start at the beginning: once budgets are separated, programs are designed, job descriptions are formed” and integration is nearly impossible – Yamin.Integrated pre-service training of health care providersIntegrated performance and health outcome indicatorsExcluding initiatives that are narrow, categorical and verticalInitiatives that strengthen health systemsPrograms that allow for flexibility and learning, both in activities and fundingDiverse partnerships: “We are increasingly finding ourselves needing to work in a partnership way: in public-private partnerships, bringing in UN agencies, bringing in the host country governments, bringing in bilateral funders, foundations and [the] corporate It takes a tremendous amount of aligning of agendas and understanding how each of these different sectors and entities works, and what their perspectives are. [But,] ultimately I think we get better results from it.” – GagnaireWhile these strategies are promising, there is still a lack of research on integration and so information exchange is key. In order to address this need, Dr. Langer shared news of the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, which will “provide a space for information exchange, for productive debate and for discussion about maternal and newborn health and how to bring it closer together.”For more details from this event, continue to follow our blog this week to hear more details from Joy Riggs-Perla, Alicia Yamin, Kristen Gagnaire, and Ana Langer. Also, to learn more about integration, check out our MNH Integration Blog Series.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Digital Fundraising and the Modern Donor

first_imgThe modern fundraising landscape has gone digital and there’s no going back. If you want to stay relevant, you need to keep up. Technology has changed the face of our daily interactions and engagement. Social media and text messaging offer instant connection. Smartphones allow you to make calls, check email, play music, download apps, and more. Fitbits track our health and fitness patterns. All of this leads to greater personalization; experiences tailored to the individual. Netflix sends “Top Suggestion” emails based on viewing history. Amazon recommends items based on recent searches. Donors are looking for similarly unique experiences from the nonprofits they support. Whether you’re new to digital fundraising or a seasoned pro, embracing the digital revolution will add value to your donor relationships and boost engagement levels. But, how to create accessibility and transparency in the digital age? The answer’s at your fingertips. Use digital tools—your website, social media, email blasts, online advertising—to engage donors. To learn more, download Fundraising in the Digital Age. Keep reading for a sneak peek into the guide.What Modern Donors WantThe modern donor wants more access to your organization. Share frequent updates about your work and the impact of their gifts. Donors are much more likely to make a second gift if they receive a personalized communication detailing the influence of their support.Digital fundraising is also a great opportunity for your nonprofit to be discovered online. Harness the power of search engine optimization (SEO) to improve your positioning in search engine results. This will allow your website to increase awareness of your mission and attract new donors.Creating a donor-centric experience puts donors at the heart of everything you do and say. Use this approach online as well as in person. Solicit your donor’s opinion, create new ways for them to connect with you, and watch their loyalty grow.Gone are the days of passive donors who write a check and disappear. Today’s donors want to be actively included in your work. Thanks to your digital toolkit and technology such as Network for Good’s donor management system, there’s no reason not to give them the experience they crave. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more