OIS releases study abroad decisions

first_imgAntsy students are dreaming of Big Ben, the Colosseum and the Parthenon this week in the wake of Friday’s release of study abroad decisions from the Office of International Studies (OIS) for the 2012-2013 academic year. Kathleen Opel, director of OIS, said her department is “as excited as ever” for next year’s class of international scholars. “We’ve given our decision, and now [students] need to either confirm that they’re going to accept or decline the offer,” Opel said. “If that’s the case, then we’re able to offer that spot to somebody else. “ Opel said OIS received a total of 1,535 applications from 1,005 students. Out of the 1,005 students who applied, 754 were accepted into a study abroad program for next year, she said. Out of these 754 accepted students, Opel said 721 were admitted to their first choice program. Additionally, 245 students were waitlisted for study abroad programs. Opel said she has seen an increase in the popularity of English language programs such as London, Dublin and Perth, making them more competitive for students to get into. “Specifically the programs that we have in English tend to be those that can suit the needs of business, science, engineering and Arts and Letters students,” Opel said. “There is a growing number of business students, and because of that growth in the College of Business, where they do not have a language requirement, more of those students are gravitating toward programs where language is not a requirement.” Opel also said spring programs are more popular overall than those in the fall “by a very small margin.” The number of applicants remained relatively stagnant from last year’s numbers. Last year, 1,011 students applied for study abroad programs during the academic year and 780 students were initially accepted. Waitlisted students should not lose hope, Opel said, because some students do choose not to attend the program in which they have been accepted. Opel’s advice to waitlisted students is “be patient and be optimistic.” “We will stay in touch with [waitlisted] students and let them know at what point we’ve pretty much filled capacity and don’t see any more changes coming,” Opel said. Opel added accepted students should begin to think about what is required of them before they travel abroad. OIS will offer pre-departure programs in the coming months for students studying abroad during the fall 2012 semester, but she said they should work on obtaining a passport and familiarizing themselves with safety and security measures as soon as possible. “By the time [students studying abroad] leave campus, they should have a pretty good grounding of what to expect when they get there,” she said. Sophomore Matt Hayes said he is already gearing up to spend the spring 2013 semester in Bologna, Italy. A Program of Liberal Studies and Italian major, Hayes said he hopes to become fluent in Italian during his time abroad. “I chose Bologna for the opportunity to become fluent and study at an actual Italian university,” he said. Hayes also plans to spend Easter at the Vatican. However, he said he is most looking forward to the food. “Bologna is called ‘La Grassa,’ meaning ‘the Fat One.’ It is the food capital of Italy,” Hayes said. “I’m excited to eat my way through Italy.” Sophomore Margeaux Prinster will spend the spring 2013 semester in Rome. As an anthropology major with a peace studies minor, Prinster said she is fascinated by the archeological value of Rome. “I’m really interested in archeology, and Rome is an awesome place to be for that because you’re basically living in ancient Rome with a modern twist,” she said. Prinster added she also wants to travel beyond Rome. “I’m most excited about travelling and seeing everything,” Prinster said. “I really, really want to go skiing in the Alps.”last_img read more

Industriens hails role of active management in 2015 results

first_imgThe pension fund said 2015 had been a very unsettled year with many economic and political factors at play, and that this had increased risk on financial markets.While equities produced high returns in the first quarter, the picture then changed markedly over the course of April, and the turbulence continued for the rest of the year, it said.Industriens said it had made good returns in its DKK38.6bn portfolio of equities, with Danish shares producing 33.3% – 2.5 percentage points higher than the market as a whole – and foreign shares generating 6.4%, which beat the market by 3.4 percentage points.Mortensen said: “We invested in the right shares, and at the same time our external managers did well, which also shows the value creation of our active management for members’ pension savings.”Unlisted investments ended the year with an overall return of 15.7%, with private equity alone returning 21.9%.Its portfolio of unlisted investments in Denmark and abroad now totals DKK31.8bn, having been built up to this level over many years.Mortensen said unlisted investments contributed significantly to the total return, making a decisive difference at a time of low interest rates and instability on the financial markets, and that the assets had added stability to the whole portfolio.Fixed interest assets, however, produced low or negative returns.Nominal Gilt-edged bonds returned 0.5% in 2015, index-linked Gilts gave 1%, and corporate bonds – which make up 30.8% of the overall portfolio – made a 1.8% loss. Industriens Pension in Denmark has reported a 6.7% overall return for 2015 in preliminary annual results and said its active management produced a good level of outperformance.In absolute terms, the pension fund’s investments returned DKK8.6bn (€1.1bn).Back in November, the DKK147bn (€19.7bn) labour-market pension fund reported it had produced a pre-tax return of 3.8% for the first nine months of 2015.Laila Mortensen, Industriens Pension’s chief executive, said: “Both the active management of equities and bonds and unlisted asset classes delivered good results, which has ensured all members a significant return on their pension savings.”last_img read more

Kearney warns against complacency

first_img It may be Payne is kept in reserve even if he is fit to play Georgia on Sunday. Hooker Rory Best (calf) and flanker Chris Henry (severe migraine) are unlikely to feature against the Lelos and four players have been added to the Ireland training group – Ulster centre Darren Cave, Munster back Andrew Conway, Leinster tighthead Tadhg Furlong and Robin Copeland, the Munster back row. Best has resumed running and could be back to face the Wallabies. Michael Kearney added: “It might be more prudent to give him a few more days to recover just to make sure he is right. “A more realistic target might be Australia but he hasn’t been ruled out of Sunday.” Ireland are determined to carry the momentum from the victory over the Springboks and full-back Rob Kearney expects head coach Joe Schmidt to make tactical alterations to front up to a Georgia side reliant on a fearsome forward pack. “We have an ability as players to play lots of different types of game plans and we’ve got a fantastic coaching squad who are able to manipulate a specific type of game plan based on the opposition we are playing,” Rob Kearney added. “South Africa and Georgia are two very different teams so I would imagine our game plan will vary a little bit. “They’re a good team and they have a huge pack. A lot, if not all of them, are playing Top 14 and Premiership rugby. “Okay, a lot of their backs are homegrown players, but they do have the potential to be dangerous players.” Like his full-back, Schmidt will not be satisfied with the South Africa win. “He’s trying to make us winners every single week, to improve our performance on a weekly basis,” Rob Kearney added. “He’s trying to make us that 80-minute plus team, which is something we probably haven’t been a lot over the last decade or so. “It (beating South Africa) gives us that confidence to take on Southern Hemisphere teams. “That is huge for our mental ability going into a game, knowing we can genuinely compete and beat the best teams in the world.” The 29-year-old committed his future to Leinster on Tuesday, but had no intention of leaving to play elsewhere. “It was always a case of staying here,” he said. “I’ve no reason to leave. I’m very happy here, I’m part of two fantastic teams. “I’m playing with all my friends and we’re still competing heavily in a lot of competitions so there was never a need for me to consider moving anywhere else.” Press Association Ireland claimed a surprise 29-15 win over the Springboks, who had beaten world champions New Zealand in their prior Test a month earlier. Georgia proved challenging opposition for Ireland at the 2007 World Cup – Ireland eventually prevailing 14-10 – and that Bordeaux contest has been spoken about this week. Rob Kearney has cautioned against complacency as Ireland look to back up their defeat of South Africa against Georgia this weekend. Kearney, who on Tuesday signed a three-year extension to his Irish Rugby Football Union contract to remain at Leinster until June 2018, said: “Confidence is a brilliant thing and sometimes over-confidence can be a detrimental thing. “It is key we find the balance there between the two and by no means we get carried away with one victory over a South African team who played poorly on the day and didn’t really seem that the defeat hurt them after the game. “The scalp of getting a southern hemisphere team and the confidence it’ll bring to our team as a whole is probably the biggest benefit of the whole thing. “We are very aware of just what was achieved on the day but by no means losing the run of ourselves and getting ahead of our station. “I think South Africa played poorly enough and certainly there’s a lot of work-ons from our performance too.” Changes may be required following the Springboks victory, with centre Jared Payne to undergo further assessment on a sprained foot on Wednesday. Team manager Michael Kearney said: “Jared is going to have further medical assessment and scans tomorrow. “We’ll know a little bit better after that. At the moment there’s no detail on his chances of being fit for either Georgia or Australia.” last_img read more

Fort Nelson man dead after vehicle collision near Toad River

first_imgThe blue truck slid into the path of the green tractor trailer. That vehicle was from Fort Saskatchewan, Alberta.Police say the investigation continues, and Highway 97 remains closed until further notice.Mounties expect the highway to reopen around 1 a.m. on Saturday.Motorists are advised that there are no detours available, and to plan accordingly.Advertisement A 28 year old Fort Nelson man is dead following a motor vehicle accident near Toad River.Police were notified of a vehicle collision at around 10:30 a.m. on Friday. The incident happened around kilometre 652, five kilometres north of Toad River.Officers located a blue, 2009 Nissan Pickup Truck and a green 1997 Kenworth tractor trailer unit that had collided on the Highway.- Advertisement -The man driving the blue truck had died at the scene as a result of his injuries.Preliminary police investigation determines that the man from Fort Nelson was traveling southbound, when he lost control of his blue truck as he was negotiating a turn.Officers say the roads had been icy.Advertisementlast_img read more

Mbala, Ravena lead Mythical Team

first_imgCayetano: 4 social media groups behind SEA Games ‘sabotage’ Paul Lee confident he will be back before new season starts Completing the women’s Mythical Team are UE’s Love Joy Sto. Domingo (75.64 SPs), NU teammates Rhena Itesi (71.14 SPs) and Ria Nabalan (69.00 SPs), and University of Santo Tomas’ Sai Larosa (61.00 SPs).Marian Justine Domingo of UP has also been named as the Rookie of the Year.The awarding ceremonies will be held before Game 2 of the UAAP Season 80 Finals on Wednesday at Mall of Asia Arena.ADVERTISEMENT Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. LATEST STORIES Ateneo’s Thirdy Ravena dunks against University of Santo Tomas in the second round of the UAAP Season 80 men’s basketball tournament at Smart Araneta Coliseum. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBen Mbala has officially been named UAAP Season 80 MVP.The Cameroonian big man led defending champion La Salle to a return trip to the finals.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next Mbala ran away with the award after amassing 96.58 total statistical points (SPs) after averaging 26.0 points, 13.08 rebounds, 2.5 blocks, 1.3 assists, and 1.3 steals.Joining Mbala in the Mythical Team are Ateneo forward Thirdy Ravena (66.50 SPs), NU guard J-Jay Alejandro (63.86 SPs), UE scorer Alvin Pasaol (63.43 SPs), and La Salle high-flyer Ricci Rivero (56.29 SPs).FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutUniversity of the Philippines’ Juan Gomez de Liaño has also been cited as this season’s Rookie of the Year after netting 11.61 points, 6.15 rebounds, 2.54 assists, and 1.0 steal in his first year in Diliman.In the women’s division, NU bruiser Jack Animam has also been tabbed as the Season MVP after collecting 77.29 SPs. CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View commentslast_img read more

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Just Released: Updated Digital Giving Index

first_imgThe latest release of Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index provides a snapshot of online giving for the first half of this year. This update looks at $71 million in donations to 20,000 charities on Network for Good’s online donation platform from January to June 2013. Check out the full infographic below, or visit Network for Good to view the index and all of our previous updates. Thanks to our friends at Event 360 for partnering with us to analyze this data.last_img

Fundraising Tips for Nonprofits Using Online Donations

first_imgOnline donations have made fundraising better in many ways. Electronic giving is much easier to track and record, and it can also be simpler to get in the first place. When a donor is moved to act by an email or social media message, all they have to do is click on the donate button and fill in the amount they wish to give.It’s instant and so much easier for them than finding a checkbook, writing a check, then searching for a stamp, etc. — and that’s if you’ve already provided a business return envelope that’s pre-addressed. Finding an envelope and writing an address doesn’t sound like much effort, but it really does cause donors to put off sending in charitable contributions. And procrastination often leads to missed donations simply because people forget or miss the end of a specific campaign. An email fundraising campaign removes all the paper-related hurdles.Include Email Campaigns in Your Nonprofit Fundraising PlansEmail allows you to ask for donations repeatedly without being offensive – if you do it right. Design your email campaign to include a series of emails that all tie together but that each says something different. Here’s an example of how a series might go.Day 1: Celebratory kickoff announcement with an enthusiastic ask and a link to your fundraising website.Day 3: Case study demonstrating how vital your cause is, along with specific information on how much you want to raise and how the money will be used — and remember every email is going to ask your readers to donate and prominently display your link for making online donations.Day 7: Update on how the fundraising is going, reiteration of the goal, and a success story with quotes from someone who has been helped by the kind of project you are doing.Day 10: Thank you note to all who have given so far, from an executive or celebrity spokesperson, reiterating the benefits of achieving your goal.Day 13: Last-chance notice informing people that the campaign is coming to a close, so if they haven’t made a donation, they must do so immediately.You may be able to do more depending on the length of your campaign. This gives you an idea of how to get the word out without being too redundant. Each email includes unique content and shares something different.Mirror Your Email Campaign in Social MediaDuring a campaign, post your social media content on a similar schedule with abbreviated versions of the same messages found in your emails. If you have stories to share that are too long to include in a social post, put them on your fundraising website and include a link to them in a post that directs readers there. And of course ask everyone to share your posts!In essence, you set up your fundraising website, design your campaign, and share your message through email and social media. Use pictures and tell stories, just like you would in a print campaign. That’s the gist of a successful plan, and it makes managing donations a simple process for both you and your donors.Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, so contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

Must-Read Insight into Millennials: Interview with Kari Saratovsky (Part 1)

first_imgKari Saratovsky: I’ve spent the better part of the past five years trying to understand the complexity of what is now the largest and most diverse generation in our history. When I finished reading the Playbook, I was thirsting to know even more, so I asked to interview superstar author Kari Saratovsky. With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org. Millennials probably aren’t your most generous donor cohort today, but they are the leading indicator of online trends and where your organization needs to shift its communications and fundraising focus. You talk about embracing the “Millennial mindset.” What does that mean, and how do you make it happen? However, Millennials will be the recipients of a $41 trillion transfer of wealth. This presents nonprofits with a huge opportunity to build relationships today that will deepen over time. When NFG recognized that its community was struggling to engage this younger donor cohort, I jumped on the chance to craft this guide. But they’re also impulsive and want to donate easily, whether that’s online, via their phones, or whatever other device is on hand. Plus, because they have limited dollars today, they want to be able to pool their resources with friends and peers for a greater impact. All of this is forcing organizations to get smarter with their outreach to this generation. Yes and no. Millennials want what any smart donor wants. They want to know the impact of the dollars they invest in an organization. They want to be thanked and recognized for their efforts. They want to feel like they’re making a tangible difference. Embracing the Millennial mindset is an opportunity for organizations to integrate qualities that are important to Millennials—such as openness, transparency, and appreciation of diversity and collaboration—into their culture asap. But remember: The only way to get there is to share this recommendation, using data and anecdotes, to get buy-in from your peers and leadership. Everyone has to be invested in making this shift, and it won’t happen overnight. So get started now! Do Millennials really have different expectations when it comes to their philanthropic giving? Nancy Schwartz: Kari, why did you dig into this topic? Read Part Two »Wow! I’m amazed and delighted by the just-released Millennial Donor Playbook (download your free copy here). We finally have a much-needed guide to engaging these prospects who are influencing change across organizations and generations. This prerequisite to current and future fundraising success applies to donors across all generations—and it’s prompting a shift in organizational culture, from large, national-affiliate organizations to small, community-based ones. Peer-to-peer is big in online giving. What’s the secret of five-star peer-to-peer fundraising campaigns? Organizations get the greatest response from peer-to-peer campaigns when they equip their existing donor base with the tools to make it easy for them to engage their friends, colleagues, and families. All of a sudden, you can connect with people who may be one or two times removed from your immediate network, and the possibilities to build upon that are endless. That’s exponential reach, at least potentially. We provide specific how-tos in the Playbook. If you’re still trying to decide if peer-to-peer or social fundraising is right for you, review this list of questions you should be asking. Download your copy of The Millennial Donor Playbook today. But to open that door, you have to be willing to relinquish some control and trust that your people know what their families and friends care about and want. And you have to remain confident that the most passionate members of your network will be the strongest champions of your cause. We’ll be back with Part 2 soon. Thanks so much, Kari! What I’ve learned is that while organizations are on an endless search for the silver bullet to engaging Millennials, there is no magic wand to engage the broad range of Millennial perspectives and backgrounds. Alas!last_img read more

Manifesto for Maternal Health: Highlights From Women Deliver and Population Council

first_imgPlease join the conversation! Tell us about your work to improve maternal health over the past year and how it relates to the calls to action from the manifesto. Send an email to Kate Mitchell or Natalie Ramm or join the dialogue on Twitter using the hashtag #MHmanifesto and help us celebrate the anniversary of the manifesto for maternal health!Share this: Posted on March 4, 2014November 14, 2016By: Natalie Ramm, Communications Coordinator, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Continuing the celebration of the one-year anniversary of the “Manifesto for Maternal Health,” this post showcases the work of Women Deliver and the Population Council to improve global maternal health.Women DeliverIn 2013, Women Deliver organized its third global conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was one of the largest gatherings of policymakers, advocates, and researchers focused exclusively on women’s health and empowerment to date, bringing together over 4,500 participants from 149 countries.Women Deliver’s work focuses primarily on the Manifesto’s first and second principles, as we work to influence the post-2015 agenda. We are pushing for the post-2015 development framework to prioritize gender equality, with a specific focus on education and health, including access to reproductive health and family planning information and services.Last year, Women Deliver and the World Bank published a report highlighting the significant social and economic benefits of investing in girls and women and recommending specific policies to improve reproductive health outcomes. We also published a report about our 2013 global conference, including information about panelists, attendees, and sessions.Population CouncilA crucial gap in improving the quality of maternal health services is that the validity of many global benchmarks, including skilled attendance at birth, is largely unknown. To improve measurement of maternal health care received during labor and delivery (core area 10 in the Manifesto for Maternal Health), investigators at the Population Council, led by PI Ann Blanc, are conducting research to identify a set of indicators that that have the potential for valid measurement and integration into population-based data collection systems in developing country contexts. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more