The magic two words that will get people to retweet you

first_imgDan Zarrella is one of my favorite thinkers on social media, because he mines massive amounts of data and bases his recommendations on hard science. This is relatively rare yet needed in the field of social media marketing, and so he’s well worth following.He recently analyzed 2.7 million tweets and concluded the following that people retweet when they are asked nicely as part of the original tweet. Conclusion? If you have something you want people to spread, ask them – with a pretty please.last_img

Planning a fundraising event? Read this.

first_imgHow do you make sure you raise more through your fundraising event?This might sound painfully obvious, but it’s often overlooked by many nonprofits: Make sure to give attendees the option to give more at your event. Be appreciative of those who have purchased tickets and are attending your event, but recognize that a portion of your attendees will be ready and willing to do even more. Here are strategies for opening the door to more donations at your next event:Auctions & Raffles: Auctions, games, and raffles are popular ways to raise even more money. The best raffles and auctions feature items that tie back to your cause or reflect your community’s unique interests.Mobile Donations: Channel supporters’ good feelings into more gifts by reminding them that they can give on the spot via their mobile device. (Don’t have a mobile-friendly donation and events solution? Check out Network for Good’s affordable fundraising software.)Recurring Donations and Memberships: Create a “Donation Station” or membership kiosk that will help your loyal supporters set up a recurring gift or become members of your organization. Be sure to staff your booth to make this process personal, easy, and fun.Additional Gifts: Make it easy for attendees to not only register for tickets online, but to also give an additional donation.Illustrate Your Impact: When your donors feel like there is a real, tangible benefit as a result of their donation, they’ll be more likely to give again.Need an easy-to-use Fundraising Event and Ticketing tool? Schedule a personalized demo to learn how we can help you have your most successful event ever.last_img read more

5 Ways to Use Stories to Increase Donations

first_imgThere are infinite ways to tell your nonprofit stories, but do you know which ones will lead to more donations? Check out these great tips shared in our free webinar, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 2. Share stories on your blog.Blogging is a great way to grow your online presence, establish credibility, and increase your reach. You can highlight specific constituents, volunteers, staff, and board members—you can even let them write their own stories. Tying your blog to your website makes these testimonials, updates on upcoming events, and ongoing campaigns easy for visitors to access without receiving direct communication from you. 4. Turn donors into advocates with nurturing emails.Nurturing emails are a great way to consistently share your stories. Send welcome emails after a friend signs up for your blog, or deliver a series of emails to build anticipation once a guest signs up for an event. The goal is to familiarize people with your organization, explain how you’re being successful, describe what you want to accomplish, and share stories of successful fundraisers. Make what you’re doing human and relatable to inspire people to fundraise and advocate for your cause. 5. Revamp your annual report.After your annual report is published, do you know how many people are actually reading it? Chances are it’s not many! Because your annual report contains the proof, data, and impact of your mission, you should do everything possible to make people want to read it. Make it beautiful (forget endless columns of small black text), shareable (does it include great pictures and Twitter icons?), visual (do you have infographics and appealing charts to make your content easy to digest?), and accessible (is it easy to understand, and does it fit on your website?). Making your annual report more creative will encourage people to read it, share it, and donate in support of it!Want to learn more about how telling your stories can lead to better donor involvement and more money? Download the on-demand webinar presentation, How to Use Content to Boost Your Donations. 3. Tie donor actions to numbers.This might not sound like a story, but trust us, it is! Close the loop for your supporters by letting them know exactly what their donation will give someone else. Will it mean two pairs of shoes, a warm meal, an immunization? Donors love to know where their money is going and what impact they’re making on someone’s life. Including a visual makes the story of a donation more compelling to a potential donor. Many organizations are hesitant to make a video; it can be expensive, time consuming, and technical. But it can also be easy and inspiring. Connect with your viewers by telling them an easy-to-follow short story that centers on just one or two people. Focus on the quality of the story and engaging your viewer, not on making a super-high-quality video. Your supporters know you’re not Hollywood, so your video doesn’t need to be as technically savvy. 1. Tell personal stories through video. last_img read more

What’s the state of your online giving?

first_imgIn our latest Network for Good video clip, I share some key points about the state of online giving. Online donations continue to grow at a faster clip than overall giving as more of our communication and actions go online. As digital natives come into their own and as we see peer fundraising, mobile giving, and events like giving days become nonprofit staples, we expect online giving rates to climb more quickly. To make the most of digitally-minded donors, your online fundraising strategy needs to adhere to these core tenets:Online giving can’t be siloed. Your online fundraising efforts should be tied to your overall fundraising strategy, and integrated with your offline marketing outreach. Make sure your website, email, and social media messages match your direct mail appeals. Your donors’ conversation with you will span more than one channel. Many offline donors will still go online to learn more about you and read about the impact a gift could have. Online giving must be easy. The beauty of technology is that it can make things easier, faster, and more fun. Your donation experience should work to remove any barriers that might prevent someone from giving. Remember: the fewer steps and clicks it takes someone to complete a donation, the more likely they are to give.Online giving should encourage more gifts. In addition to making it easy to give, your donation experience should inspire donors to give more. By offering a compelling story, suggested donation amounts, and recurring giving options, you can increase your overall fundraising totals as well as your average online gift. Need to boost your fundraising results? These resources will help you think through your online strategy:Understand online fundraising patterns by reviewing the Digital Giving Index.Check to see how your online donation experience stacks up with the Donation Page Grader.Learn how to attract more donors with your website, through email, and via mobile and social in our Online Fundraising Survival Guide.Sign up for a free demo of Network for Good’s fundraising software. Our team will give you a full tour and answer your questions about which tools are right for your campaigns.How are you integrating online fundraising at your organization? Chime in below to share your tips and challenges with your fellow readers.last_img read more

Fundraising Tips for Nonprofits Using Online Donations

first_imgOnline donations have made fundraising better in many ways. Electronic giving is much easier to track and record, and it can also be simpler to get in the first place. When a donor is moved to act by an email or social media message, all they have to do is click on the donate button and fill in the amount they wish to give.It’s instant and so much easier for them than finding a checkbook, writing a check, then searching for a stamp, etc. — and that’s if you’ve already provided a business return envelope that’s pre-addressed. Finding an envelope and writing an address doesn’t sound like much effort, but it really does cause donors to put off sending in charitable contributions. And procrastination often leads to missed donations simply because people forget or miss the end of a specific campaign. An email fundraising campaign removes all the paper-related hurdles.Include Email Campaigns in Your Nonprofit Fundraising PlansEmail allows you to ask for donations repeatedly without being offensive – if you do it right. Design your email campaign to include a series of emails that all tie together but that each says something different. Here’s an example of how a series might go.Day 1: Celebratory kickoff announcement with an enthusiastic ask and a link to your fundraising website.Day 3: Case study demonstrating how vital your cause is, along with specific information on how much you want to raise and how the money will be used — and remember every email is going to ask your readers to donate and prominently display your link for making online donations.Day 7: Update on how the fundraising is going, reiteration of the goal, and a success story with quotes from someone who has been helped by the kind of project you are doing.Day 10: Thank you note to all who have given so far, from an executive or celebrity spokesperson, reiterating the benefits of achieving your goal.Day 13: Last-chance notice informing people that the campaign is coming to a close, so if they haven’t made a donation, they must do so immediately.You may be able to do more depending on the length of your campaign. This gives you an idea of how to get the word out without being too redundant. Each email includes unique content and shares something different.Mirror Your Email Campaign in Social MediaDuring a campaign, post your social media content on a similar schedule with abbreviated versions of the same messages found in your emails. If you have stories to share that are too long to include in a social post, put them on your fundraising website and include a link to them in a post that directs readers there. And of course ask everyone to share your posts!In essence, you set up your fundraising website, design your campaign, and share your message through email and social media. Use pictures and tell stories, just like you would in a print campaign. That’s the gist of a successful plan, and it makes managing donations a simple process for both you and your donors.Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your fundraising efforts, so contact us today or call 1-888-284-7978 x1.last_img read more

Quality of Antenatal Care in Zambia: A National Assessment

first_imgPosted on January 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth recently published an article, Quality of antenatal care in Zambia: A national assessment, that classified and assessed the level of ANC services in health facilities in Zambia.Take a look at the abstract:BackgroundAntenatal care (ANC) is one of the recommended interventions to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. Yet in most Sub-Saharan African countries, high rates of ANC coverage coexist with high maternal and neonatal mortality. This disconnect has fueled calls to focus on the quality of ANC services. However, little conceptual or empirical work exists on the measurement of ANC quality at health facilities in low-income countries. We developed a classification tool and assessed the level of ANC service provision at health facilities in Zambia on a national scale and compared this to the quality of ANC received by expectant mothers.MethodsWe analysed two national datasets with detailed antenatal provider and user information, the 2005 Zambia Health Facility Census and the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), to describe the level of ANC service provision at 1,299 antenatal facilities in 2005 and the quality of ANC received by 4,148 mothers between 2002 and 2007.ResultsWe found that only 45 antenatal facilities (3%) fulfilled our developed criteria for optimum ANC service, while 47% of facilities provided adequate service, and the remaining   50% offered inadequate service. Although 94% of mothers reported at least one ANC visit with a skilled health worker and 60% attended at least four visits, only 29% of mothers received good quality ANC, and only 8% of mothers received good quality   ANC and attended in the first trimester.ConclusionsDHS data can be used to monitor “effective ANC coverage” which can be far below ANC coverage as estimated by current indicators. This “quality gap” indicates missed opportunities at ANC for delivering effective interventions. Evaluating the level of ANC provision at health facilities is an efficient way to detect where deficiencies are located in the system and could serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate country progress.Access the PDF of the article here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Placing Women at the Center: Rethinking the RMNCH Continuum of Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 22, 2013June 12, 2017By: Ann Starrs, President and Co-Founder, Family Care InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted from the FCI Blog and the PMNCH website.Last week’s Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC), held in Arusha, Tanzania, was both inspiring and sobering. Twenty-five years after the Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched at an international conference held in neighboring Kenya, maternal mortality has finally begun to decline, and there are many and diverse examples of how countries are addressing the challenge of preventing deaths of women and newborns from complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. But as the conference highlighted, huge challenges remain — in improving the quality of care, the conference’s core theme; in strengthening the functionality and capacity of health systems; in addressing major inequities in access to care, within and across countries; and in ensuring that maternal and newborn health receives the political support, increased funding, and public attention that it needs.The majority of the conference’s breakout sessions featured informative and often fascinating presentations on research findings and promising programmatic and technical innovations. One session, however, took a different tack — a debate on “Has the ascendance of the RMNCH continuum of care framework helped or hindered the cause of maternal health?”  I proposed this session to the Maternal Health Task Force, which organized the GMHC, because for me and the organization I head, Family Care International, maternal health has been at the core of our institutional mission since we planned the first Safe Motherhood conference in 1987. For much of the past decade, however, I have been closely involved with the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) and Countdown to 2015, two coalitions that are dedicated to promoting an integrated, comprehensive approach to the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) continuum of care. Have our efforts to define and advance the continuum of care framework contributed to progress in improving maternal health? If so, how much? If not, what can be done about it?These questions were debated by a stellar panel I moderated, which included Wendy Graham, Professor of Obstetric Epidemiology at the University of Aberdeen; Marleen Temmerman, the new head of the Department of Reproductive Health and Research at WHO; Friday Okonofua, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Benin, Nigeria; and Richard Horton, Editor in Chief of The Lancet, as well as a fantastic and diverse audience. To start the discussion I shared the definition of the continuum of care that PMNCH has articulated, based in part on the World Health Report 2005: a constellation of services and interventions for mothers and children from pre-pregnancy/adolescence, through pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal/postpartum period, until children reach the age of five years. This continuum promotes the integration of services across two dimensions: across the lifespan, and across levels of the health system, from households to health facilities. Key packages of interventions within the continuum include sexuality education, family planning, antenatal care, delivery care, postnatal/postpartum care, and the prevention and management of newborn and childhood illnesses.It is, of course, impossible to conduct a randomized control trial on the impact of the RMNCH continuum of care on maternal health, so the discussion was based more on perceptions than on hard evidence. Nevertheless, there are a few data points to consider in debating the question. From an advocacy perspective, panelists generally agreed, the adoption of the continuum of care framework has helped the cause by appealing to multiple constituencies related to women’s and children’s health. Attribution is always a challenge; there are many other developments over the past 5-7 years that have also had an impact, such as the two Women Deliver conferences held in 2007 and 2010 (with the third one taking place in May of this year). But participants generally agreed that linking women’s and children’s health, and defining their needs as an integrated whole, has appealed to policy-makers and politicians on an intuitive and practical level, as demonstrated by the engagement of heads of state, celebrities, private corporations, and other influential figures.Let’s look at the money: during the period 2003-2010 overseas development assistance (ODA) has doubled for MNCH as a whole, according to Countdown to 2015 (Countdown’s analysis did not look at funding for reproductive health, but a new report later in 2013 will incorporate this important element). Maternal and newborn health, which are examined jointly in the analysis, have consistently accounted for one-third of total ODA, with two-thirds going to child health. Given the significant funding that GAVI has mobilized and allocated for immunization over this time period, the fact that maternal and newborn health has maintained its share of total MNCH ODA is noteworthy.And let’s look at how maternal health has fared within the UN Secretary General’s Every Woman Every Child initiative, launched in September 2010: a recent report summarizes each of the commitments made to Every Woman Every Child in the two years since it was launched. Of the 275 commitments included, 147, or 53%, had specific maternal health content. If we look at the commitments according to constituency group, developing country governments had by far the largest percentage of commitments that had specific maternal health content — 84% — compared to 39% for non-governmental organizations, 24% for donors, and 52% for multilateral agencies and coalitions. Clearly, maternal health has not been marginalized within the continuum from a broad policy, program and funding perspective, despite the fear some had expressed that it would be pushed aside in favor of child health interventions that are perceived as easier and less costly to implement.Another benefit of the continuum of care framework, as noted by Dr. Okonofua, has been increased collaboration among the communities that represent its different elements. While there were tensions and rivalries when PMNCH and Countdown were first established, especially between the maternal and child health communities, today groups working on advocacy, policy, program implementation, service delivery, and research within the continuum generally work together more frequently, cordially and effectively than they did before, especially at the global level. PMNCH and Countdown, as well as Every Woman Every Child, have brought together key players to define unified messages and strategies that have achieved widespread acceptance.That was the good news; but panelists and participants at the session also saw a number of problems with the continuum of care concept. The concern articulated by Richard Horton, and echoed by many of the session participants, was that the continuum views women and adolescents primarily as mothers or future mothers. This narrow view contributes to a range of gaps and challenges; it means crucial cultural, social and economic determinants of health and survival, including female education and empowerment, are not given adequate weight. Gender-based violence deserves much more attention, both for its own sake and for its impact on maternal, newborn and child health. Politically sensitive or controversial elements of the continuum, especially abortion but also, in some cases, family planning and services for adolescents, may be neglected in policy, programming, and resource allocation.The fragmentation inherent in the continuum of care also contributes to what Wendy Graham called the compartmentalization of women. As Countdown’s analysis of coverage has demonstrated, the continuum of care doesn’t guarantee continuity of care; coverage rates are much higher for interventions like antenatal care and child immunization than for delivery or postnatal/postpartum care. Women’s needs for a range of interventions and services, available in a single health facility on any day of the week, are not being met in many countries.Other concerns that emerged during the discussion were that the RMNCH continuum of care framework does not explicitly or adequately reflect the importance of quality of care, which in turn depends on a range of factors: skilled, compassionate health care workers, functional facilities, adequate supplies and equipment, and an effective health information system that tracks not just whether interventions are being provided, but also whether individual women and their families are receiving the care they need throughout their lives.Dr. Okonofua, in his comments, focused on how the continuum of care concept has been implemented, or hasn’t, in countries. The implications of the continuum of care for on-the-ground program implementation have not been fully articulated and communicated; more effort, he noted, needs to be invested in making the concept relevant and useful for policy-makers, program managers, and service providers.Despite these gaps, however, participants in the session – and the panelists themselves – agreed that the continuum of care is a valid and valuable concept, and that the inadequacies identified should be addressed. “Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater,” said one member of the audience. The continuum of care, as a concept, has already evolved; initially, for example, it did not fully integrate reproductive health elements. As Marleen Temmerman commented, the continuum of care concept is a tool; what is important is what is done with it.As 2015 approaches, the global health community is struggling to articulate a health goal for the post-2015 development framework that will resonate widely and guide accelerated, strategic action to prevent avoidable deaths and improve health of people around the world. The RMNCH community — or communities — needs a framework that more fully reflects the realities and complexities of the lives of women and children, and that enables us to reach out to other health and non-health communities, including HIV/AIDS, NCDs, and women’s rights and empowerment, for a common cause. To do this, we need to revise the continuum of care framework to maximize its relevance and utility for countries, and to incorporate the following missing elements:Recognition of the importance of quality of careResponsiveness to the needs of girls and women throughout the life cycle, not just in relation to pregnancy and childbirthLinks to the cultural, social and economic determinants of women’s and children’s healthRichard Horton’s call for a manifesto to emerge from the GMHC included 10 key points; redefining the RMNCH continuum of care was one of them, inspired by the panel. The challenge has been issued; it is now up to us to meet that challenge.Share this:last_img read more

The MHTF is Pleased to Announce the Launch of the MHTF Quarterly

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 1, 2013August 15, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is excited to announce the launch of the first issue of our newsletter, the MHTF Quarterly.  Each issue of the Quarterly will highlight critical issue in maternal health, compiling resources, including new and important research, multimedia and news. For the first issue, the Quarterly focuses on malaria in pregnancy.From the Quarterly:Despite encouraging progress, coverage of malaria control efforts among pregnant women remains low. Malaria in pregnancy continues to be a substantial contributor to maternal and infant mortality and morbidity in malaria-endemic regions.Malaria in pregnancy programming is at a critical juncture. Important gains have been made in malaria control, but without continued efforts, the gains achieved may quickly erode.Given the existing synergies and overlap between the malaria and maternal health communities, several opportunities exist to collaborate more effectively. These areas of overlap include the target population (pregnant women), common health outcomes (maternal and newborn mortality and morbidity), and a shared delivery mechanism (the antenatal care platform).To receive the Quarterly or any of our other features, including the biweekly MH Buzz, by email, please sign up using our online form.Share this:last_img read more

New MHTF Topics Page: Post-2015: What’s Next for Maternal Health?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is pleased to announce the launch of our latest topic page: “Post-2014: What’s next for maternal health?” Along with our ongoing guest blog series on the proposed maternal health goal for the post-2015 development agenda, the topics page will compile key findings and debates on the position of maternal health in ongoing global and national discussions of health and development goals and challenges. The page includes resources on progress and lessons learned under the MDG framework, as well as on the position of maternal health in the ongoing process for developing the next global development framework. As with all of our topics pages, the post-2015 topics page will serve as a hub, featuring the latest in research, news and debates. To recommend a resource, please contact us.  If you would like to submit a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on proposed maternal health targets, please email Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

“Taking Measure of Growth Charts” Published in The Wall Street Journal

first_imgPosted on December 22, 2014October 28, 2016By: Alison Chatfield, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Are newborn growth charts one size fits all? Are growth charts developed based on how babies in the U.S. have grown in the past applicable in the U.S. today, or to countries around the world? Is it possible to create truly global standards for how a baby should grow?These are the questions at the heart of a new article published in The Wall Street Journal by Jo Craven McGrinty. Current practice has physicians assess a newborn’s weight and length against growth charts generated from data on previous births in the country they live in. This practice could work if a country’s population is completely healthy, and therefore provides an optimal standard for comparison. But, if it isn’t, then using population-specific standards can lead to certain characteristics of poor growth becoming institutionalized. What is needed are growth standards that provide an indication of how babies should grow under optimal conditions, rather than comparing growth to how babies have grown in the past.Enter, the INTERGROWTH-21st Project. The INTERGROWTH-21st Project has created globally validated growth standards that provide a universal norm of how babies shouldgrow under optimal conditions. By including approximately 60,000 healthy women from eight countries in the study, the project was able to develop true norms for fetal growth and newborn size that can be used in any country.Like the WHO Child Growth Standards before it, the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are poised to replace national-level growth references that describe how babies have grown in the past. The article ends on a forward-looking note, acknowledging that the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are just one of several assessment tools that are needed to inform interventions to improve maternal and newborn health, “but measurements pegged to good health are a start,” McGrinty concludes.The full article can be found at the Wall Street Journal.This article was reposted from the INTERGROWTH-21st blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

VIDEO: Take an Interactive Tour of Our Donor Management System

first_imgAs a small nonprofit, you need systems that intuitively understand the jobs you need to accomplish. On any given day, nonprofit development staff members are hard at work communicating with supporters. The fundamentals of your work can be broken into five categories: soliciting donations, stewarding donors, acknowledging gifts, analyzing your data, and reporting on activity. Wouldn’t it be nice if there were one, integrated system that would let you do all of that? There is! It’s a donor management system.Our Back to School campaign continues with a campus tour—of our donor management system.An all-in-one donor management system (DMS) allows you to track your donors’ activity with your organization; send appeals and acknowledgments; and launch campaigns with branded, designed donation pages. Well-organized information focuses your efforts and shows you new ways to improve your fundraising results.At Network for Good we believe small organizations deserve great technology. Take a tour of our donor management system and see for yourself:See the full picture of your contacts and donors.At-a-glance reportingClear visuals show your progress and trends, eliminating time spent searching and creating reports.View an immediate snapshot of your lapsed donors to know where to target your outreach.Record donations, relationships, and communications to better track information on all of your contacts.Use our recommended filters to segment groups of donors and contacts for targeted cultivation.Keep your data clean and organized with automated checks. Easily find and merge duplicate contacts.Combined with our beautiful donation pages and inspiring peer to peer fundraising campaigns you’ll have the best donor experience integrated with the easiest donor management software powered on any device. Read our recent blog post, 3 Ways to Efficiently Fundraise with Donor Management, to find out how a DMS can improve your fundraising efforts.Network for Good believes in the power of small nonprofits. We believe a donor management system should save you time and improve efficiency, in order to free you up to do the good you do in your community.Want to know more? Contact us for your own personal “campus” tour. We’d love to show you around!last_img read more

GPS helps RCMP find stolen equipment in Dawson Creek

first_imgTwo men, known to police were arrested and are currently in custody. The investigation is ongoing. DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – A GPS system helped to find stolen equipment in Dawson Creek.On Tuesday, August 14, Beaverlodge RCMP in requested the assistance from the Dawson Creek RCMP with the recovery of stolen heavy equipment. Two skid steers were stolen sometime overnight from Beaverlodge and the GPS was showing the equipment was in the Dawson Creek area.Utilizing satellite imagery an approximate location was determined and police located yellow skid steers that matched the description of the stolen machines. During the investigation, police also recovered four pickup trucks, believed to be stolen, as well as other suspected stolen property.last_img

Protests erupt in West Bengal over BJPs LS poll candidate selection

first_imgKolkata: Protests erupted in various parts of West Bengal after the BJP, in its first list of 28 candidates, nominated its veterans and defectors from the ruling Trinamool Congress to take on Mamata Banerjee’s party in the state. With old-timers being overlooked in favour of turncoats and newcomers, protestors gathered outside BJP offices in various parts of the state and, in some places, put up posters of rejected ticket aspirants outside the offices. Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari Puja BJP state vice-president Raj Kamal Pathak submitted his resignation after he was denied a party ticket. The saffron party, which bagged two Lok Sabha seats in the state in the 2014 elections, is now targeting 23 of the state’s 42 constituencies. Of its 28 candidates, nearly 25 are new faces, with a thrust on active political workers rather than greenhorns from the glamour world. Unlike the TMC which had 18 new faces and a mix of old-timers and greenhorns, hardcore politicians and personalities from the film industry, the BJP has put faith on its own leaders and defectors from other parties. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highway “If after serving the party for three decades and holding the post of vice-president do not make me qualified to get a party ticket, it is better to resign from the post,” Pathak said. The veteran BJP leader wanted to contest from Hooghly district, but he was overlooked in favour of a newcomer in the party. BJP state president Dilip Ghosh said efforts will be made to pacify the dissidents. “There can be resentment in some places, but everything can be sorted out through discussions,” BJP state secretary Rahul Sinha said. This is not the first time the BJP has faced such protests. During the Kolkata Municipal Corporation polls in 2015, several ticket aspirants staged protest rallies outside the party office. Of the candidates, five had recently defected to the saffron party from the Trinamool Congress and one from the CPI(M). Union minister and BJP MP from Asansol Lok Sabha constituency Babul Supriyo has been renominated from the same seat and is pitted against actor Moon Moon Sen of the TMC. State BJP president Dilip Ghosh will contest from Medinipur seat against TMC leader Manas Bhunia. BJP national secretary Rahul Sinha will take on TMC heavyweight Sudip Bandopadhyay in Kolkata North Lok Sabha seat. State BJP vice-president and Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose’s grandnephew, Chandra Kumar Bose will contest from Kolkata South Lok Sabha seat. Former IPS officer Bharati Ghosh, once known to be close to Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee, will be fighting against TMC candidate and actor Dipak Adhikary, popularly known as ‘Dev’, from Ghatal Lok Sabha constituency. The BJP has fielded former Trinamool Congress MLA Arjun Singh from Barrackpur Lok Sabha seat. Singh, who had recently joined the saffron party, has been pitted against TMC’s Dinesh Trivedi. In Coochbebar Lok Sabha seat, the party has fielded former TMC youth leader Nishith Pramanik, while in Jadavpur, expelled TMC MP Anupam Hazra will contest against TMC’s Mimi Chakraborty, an actor by profession. Another former TMC MP Soumitra Khan, who joined the BJP in January, has been given ticket from Bishnupur (SC) Lok Sabha seat. Former CPI(M) MLA Khagen Murmu, who too had switched over to the BJP, will contest from Malda North seat against TMC’s Mausam Benazir Noor, who had recently defected to the party from the Congress, in Malda Uttar seat. Former TMC leader Sreerupa Mitra Chowdhury, who had contested elections on a TMC ticket from New Delhi, is the BJP candidate from the neighbouring Malda South seat. There are four women candidates and one Muslim nominee in the first list. The BJP in minority-dominated seats such as Malda South, Malda North and Basirhat did not field any candidate from the community. “We do not believe in giving tickets just on the basis of religion. For us winnability is the biggest criteria,” said a state BJP leader. The Lok Sabha elections in the state will be held from April 11 till May 19 in seven phases.last_img read more

Will resolve identity issue of Gorkhas CM

first_imgDarjeeling: Trinamool Congress supremo Mamata Banerjee on Friday stated that she will resolve the identity issue of the Gorkhas and work out a permanent solution. On a campaign tour of North Bengal, Banerjee preached the mantra of unity at Naxalbari in Darjeeling.Flanked by Gorkha Janmukti Morcha (GJM) president Binay Tamang, TMC candidate Amar Singh Rai and TMC leader Goutam Deb along with tribal leaders and tea garden workers, Banerjee stated: “We are together- Hill and plains. This is India. This is Bengal. Here Bengalis, Gorkhas, Adivasis and minorities are all one. There is no difference.” Also Read – Bengal family worships Muslim girl as Goddess Durga in Kumari PujaThe Chief Minister said BJP is the root cause of all unrest. “We placate the Hills while BJP fans communal fire. Even CPI(M) and Congress follow suit. There is full understanding between BJP, Congress and CPI(M) in Bengal,” alleged Banerjee. She stated that TMC does not want clashes, murder, unrest and political strife. “We want peace and development. We want to work together. We want schools, hospitals, roads and tea gardens to be opened,” Banerjee said. Also Read – Bengal civic volunteer dies in road mishap on national highwayThe TMC supremo also expressed her gratitude towards the GJM. “We are together. We have fielded a son of the soil- Amar Singh Rai. We need someone to stand by the people through thick and thin, not someone who always runs away to Delhi.” Banerjee stated that the 2019 election is very important. “You have to throw out the BJP government from Delhi. They have fooled you. During the last general election and election campaign in North Bengal, Narendra Modi had clearly stated that if voted to power the Union government would take over and run all the locked out tea gardens of Terai and Dooars. Not a single one has been taken over,” she added. The TMC supremo alleged that Modi has also hoodwinked the Gorkhas. “During a campaign in 2014, Narendra Modi had assured that if voted to power, he would carve out Gorkhaland. Forget Gorkhaland, they did not give a central university to the Hills either,” stated Banerjee. The state government on the other hand has sanctioned a university in the Hills. Banerjee stated that despite the Assembly segments of the Darjeeling Parliamentary constituency including Matigarah-Naxalbari, Phansidewa, Siliguri having Congress and Left Front MLAs, she has never been deterred from carrying out development activities. “We have provided rations, free health care, free education and drinking water in closed tea gardens as well. I come every month so that you all don’t feel neglected,” she said to the people. Banerjee then announced a host of schemes and development activities of her government. “We will also work out a permanent solution for the Gorkha identity issue,” assured Mamata Banerjee. Without naming anyone, Banerjee alleged that the loot amassed during demonetisation is now being spent during elections. She gave a clarion call to the people, urging them to vote sensibly to oust the Modi government from power.last_img read more

Tunisia resorts tense but tourists shrug off attacks

first_imgSOUSSE – Failed suicide bombings in Tunisian resorts sparked fear Thursday among residents concerned for their livelihood, but tourists largely brushed off the attacks as they flocked to the beach.A day after Wednesday’s attacks police, national guardsmen and soldiers descended on the coastal town of Sousse, patrolling the streets and stopping motorists to search their cars.Security forces were also deployed outside supermarkets and shopping centres as part of a formidable operation to safeguard the country’s vital tourism industry. “These controls will be round the clock from now on all over Sousse,” an officer, who declined to be named, told AFP.The heightened security is evident as one approaches El Kantaoui, a luxury resort and port for yachts, where national guardsmen are deployed at roundabouts to check vehicles.El Kantaoui is north of Sousse and only 10 kilometres (six miles) from the beach where a suicide bomber blew himself up in a botched attack before authorities foiled another suicide bombing in neighbouring Monastir.Wednesday’s attacks have fuelled fears about the future of the country’s tourism sector, still struggling from the 2011 revolution, which resulted in a 30-percent drop in revenues.Already reeling from political instability sparked by the murders this year of two prominent politicians and a rise in violence attributed to jihadists, the Islamist-led government has repeatedly insisted that tourism is safe.On Thursday tourists appeared to agree with that assessment as they jogged along the beach, took rides in horse-drawn carriages, sunbathed or practiced waters sports, enjoying the warm October weather.“Yesterday I was scared, frankly. But I think such incidents are mostly a threat to Tunisia. The weather here still attracts us, and I’m determined to finish my holiday,” Aurelie, a French tourist, said as she walked her dog.Michele, another French holidaymaker lying on the beach, was also determined to see out her holiday. “I don’t want to think too much and ruin my vacation,” she said.Waiter Billel Toumi said he could not forget Wednesday’s events that easily.“Tourism has been targeted. We have been targeted,” he said. “We are not afraid for our own lives, but we must be able to work to feed our families.”Tourism accounts for a sixth of the workforce in Tunisia, according to the head of the National Tourism Office Habib Ammar, who was promoting his country at the Berlin tourism fair in March.But Tunisia has been struggling to woo tourists put off by the political turmoil across northern Africa.Figures released by the tourism ministry in mid-October showed the hotel occupancy rate for the first nine months of 2013 was 1.4 percent less than in 2012 and 15.7 percent lower than in 2010.The head of the French travel operator Selectour Afat (AS Voyage) Jean-Pierre Mas told AFP it was too soon to say if the attacks will have consequences on tourism in Tunisia.“Yesterday’s attacks… did not have measurable consequences. There are no cancellations. We cannot yet say today if the attacks affected bookings,” said Mas.“Globally the situation in Tunisia is worrisome from the economic point of view: tourism has dropped by 30 percent since the Arab Spring, it did not take off this summer, the political instability and now the attempted attacks targeting tourist zones are not favourable to the redeployment of tourism in Tunisia.”The porter of the four-star Riadh Palms hotel, the apparent target of the first attack, agreed.“We were already living through very tense times, and since yesterday’s incident we are living in fear,” said the porter, who declined to be named.“We are scared to death.”last_img read more

Fabianski West Ham eyeing an upset against Spurs

first_imgWest Ham goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski is hopeful of victory ahead of their London derby with Tottenham on SaturdayAfter enduring a torrid start to the new season, West Ham goes into this weekend’s showdown at the London Stadium with three wins in their last five matches.This includes impressive 3-1 victories over Everton and Manchester United.Now Fabianski hopes that West Ham can cause another upset against their heavily fancied London neighbours Spurs.“It’s another important one, another big one against a tough opponent, but we are playing at home so hopefully with all the hard work during the week we’ll be in good form for Saturday’s game,” Fabianski told the club website.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I’m looking forward to the atmosphere on Saturday. I’ve always enjoyed playing against Spurs – it has a nice atmosphere to it so I’m guessing it won’t be any different.“We just have to prepare ourselves well during the week and have a good game on Saturday, and make sure that the fans will be proud and happy after our performance.“You can see that we have improved, especially playing at home and the recent results here have been very good so hopefully that will continue this Saturday.”West Ham are 15th in the Premier League table with seven points from eight games.last_img read more

Bahamas meteorologist featured on PBS NOVA special TONIGHT

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppNASSAU, Bahamas – October 31, 2017 – The Bahamas’ own, Wayne Neely and his work chronicling the biggest, baddest hurricane to have hit The Bahamas and the region will be featured on the PBS NOVA series, ‘Killer Hurricanes’ and the series debuts on Wednesday November 1.The Great Hurricane of 1780 –  The Story of the Greatest and Deadliest Hurricane of the Caribbean and the Americas is the title of Neely’s book; it is a best seller.  The forecaster with the Bahamas Department of Meteorology is also an historian and told media that the real concentration will be the Great Hurricane of 1780, which remains the deadliest hurricane in North Atlantic hurricane history with 22,000 people killed — most of them slaves — in the Caribbean.Again you can find Killer Hurricanes on PBS NOVA tomorrow, November 1 at 9pm. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:#author, #greathurricaneof1780, #hurricanes, #wayneneelylast_img read more

Neil Warnock cannot wait for Brexit to happen already

first_imgCardiff City manager Neil Warnock has revealed he cannot wait to see the United Kingdom get out of the European Union, as citizens wait to see how the nation’s Brexit pans out.The details of the UK’s departure from the EU have been a major conversation in the media ever since a slim majority voted in favour of Brexit back in 2016.Now, as the deadline for the referendum approaches the United Kingdom’s parliament remains at a halt, while calls for a second referendum have become louder.It is undoubtedly a topic that demands patience and a lot of sensitivity; however Warnock, known for his blunt public statements insists he can’t wait for the 2016 decision to become a reality.MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - MAY 12: Cardiff manager Neil Warnock celebrates with the fans after the Premier League match between Manchester United and Cardiff City at Old Trafford on May 12, 2019 in Manchester, United Kingdom. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)Warnock will coach Cardiff City for one more year Manuel R. Medina – May 15, 2019 The manager will guide the Bluebirds in the English Championship, but he will also help the team find his successor.“I think once the country knows what they’re doing, it will be straightforward [to make signings] … Any transfer window is difficult for me, not just this one,” he told reporters, according to Goal.“I don’t know why politicians don’t do what the country wants, if I’m honest.”“They had a referendum and now we see different politicians and everyone else trying to put their foot in it … Why did we have a referendum in the first bloody place?”“I can’t wait to get out of it, if I’m honest. I think we’ll be far better out of the bloody thing. In every aspect.” “Football-wise as well, absolutely. To hell with the rest of the world.”last_img read more

Global Markets Asian shares US stock futures dented by growth worries

first_imgAsian markets trade lower on 18 November (Reuters).Reuters file [Representational Image]Asian shares and U.S. stock futures slipped on Tuesday as pessimism about world growth drove investors away from risky assets, while sterling dithered as the latest plan for Brexit appeared to come and go with no progress.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan fell 0.5 per cent, drifting away from a recent seven-week top.Losses were led by Chinese shares, with the blue-chip index off 0.6 per cent. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index was down 0.4 per cent and Australia’s main share index faltered 0.5 per cent.Japan’s Nikkei, which had opened firmer, was flat. US stock futures, which offer an indication of how Wall Street will open, were down about 0.5 per cent.US markets were closed on Monday for a holiday so trading was generally subdued overnight. However, equity prices in Europe and Latin America were hit after data showed a slowdown in growth in China, the world’s second-biggest economy.Adding to the air of caution and uncertainty, the International Monetary Fund trimmed its global growth forecasts and a survey showed increasing pessimism among business chiefs as trade tensions loomed.The gloomy IMF forecasts, released on the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, highlighted the challenges facing policymakers as they tackle an array of current or potential crises, from the US-China trade war to Brexit.”This is now the second IMF downgrade in a row,” ANZ analysts said in a note.”And while there have been some positive developments in recent weeks, risks remain skewed towards weaker growth, with a ‘no deal’ Brexit and a sharper-than-expected slowdown in China getting special mentions.””Between the ongoing US-China negotiations and the UK’s Brexit impasse, market sentiment will continue to be dominated by geopolitics in the near term,” ANZ added.In a sign of risk aversion, the Australian dollar, often used as a liquid proxy for China investments, nudged down to $0.7155, putting it on track for a third straight session of losses.Sterling traded cautiously around $1.2887 as British Prime Minister Theresa May refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit. There are few signs she can break a deadlock with parliament after her Brexit deal was rejected last week.May offered to tweak her defeated deal by seeking further concessions from the European Union on a backup plan to avoid a hard border in Ireland.”Any upside for sterling in the near term may be limited,” said Capital Economics analyst Liam Peach. “Uncertainty would continue during the extended negotiations and there is no guarantee that it would last for only a short period of time.”Analysts said investors were nervous about building positions in the pound, especially given the possibility of Britain leaving the EU without a deal.The dollar held at 109.62 against the Japanese yen while the euro was near the floor of its recent trading range at $1.1369. Against a basket of currencies, the dollar was flat at 96.324.In commodities, global growth worries pulled oil prices lower early on Tuesday with Brent down 14 cents at $62.60 and US crude futures off 7 cents at $53.73.last_img read more

Cards Earn High Marks in the Classroom

first_imgStory Links The academic success continues strong tradition, marking the 16th consecutive semester with a team GPA of 3.0 or higher. The 3.517 team total is the highest in head coach Justine Sowry’s eight-year tenure. Louisville recently achieved a perfect mark in the NCAA’s Graduation Success Rate (GSR) report released in November 2018. Since joining the ACC, 16 UofL field hockey players have been named to the ACC All-Academic Squads.About LouisvilleThe Cardinals finished the 2018 season with a 13-6 overall record and ranked No. 14 in the National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) poll after earning the No. 3 seed in the 2018 ACC Championship. Three players, Ayeisha McFerran, Mercedes Pastor and Taylor Stone earned NFHCA All-America honors while Alli Bitting, Bethany Russ and Carter Ayars joined them on the NFHCA All-West Region Teams.Fans can follow Louisville Field Hockey on Twitter (@ULFieldHockey) at  https://twitter.com/ULFieldHockey and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ULFieldHockey Print Friendly Version In addition to the squad’s combined academic mark, 17 student-athletes achieved a GPA at least 3.25 while 22 players finished the fall semester at 3.0 or better.center_img The University of Louisville field hockey team completed a successful fall semester in the classroom, posting a 3.517 team grade-point average.last_img read more