Census question could hurt all of us

first_imgMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsSchenectady, Saratoga casinos say reopening has gone well; revenue down 30%Schenectady High School senior class leaders look to salvage sense of normalcyEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homes Categories: Letters to the Editor, Opinion When Commerce Secretary Ross announced that the census questionnaire will include a question about citizenship in the 2020 census, he made a decision that will have a negative impact on residents of the Capital Region and in communities around this country. It might seem like an innocuous question, but it is likely to cause fear in the immigrant community and result in substantial undercounting.Many resource allocation decisions are made on the basis of census data. Money for public safety planning and disaster response, education needs, hospitals, veterans’ assistance, transportation, aid to cities, and much else is allocated at least partially by how many people live where. Our business developers use  census data to choose where and how to invest. Undercounting makes all these decisions less efficient, and thus harms us all.The League of Women Voters of Schenectady County calls on our local officials to speak out and oppose the citizenship question in the 2020 census. We must send a strong message to have Congress reverse this decision and remove the citizenship question from the census. The stakes are too high to allow this unnecessary question to derail the count.Cheryl NechamenSchenectadyThe writer is president of the League of Women Voters of Schenectady County.last_img read more

Testing ramps up with over 10,000 test performed in 2 days

first_imgStatewide—The Indiana State Department of Health has reported that 634 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 today.  A total of 26,053 Indiana residents have tested positive for the coronavirus.  To date, 160,239 tests have been reported to ISDH at a 16.3% positive rate and 26 new deaths were reported for a total of 1,508 Hoosiers have died to date.Locally, Decatur County has a total of 216 positive cases and 31 deaths, Franklin County has 107 positive cases and 7 deaths, and Ripley County has 105 positive cases and 6 deaths.last_img

Boys selected for U16 international against Wales

first_img20 Aug 2015 Boys selected for U16 international against Wales England’s U16 boys begin their 2015 international series next week against Wales and will aim to repeat last year’s clean sweep against the other home countries. The match against Wales takes place at Radyr on 26 and 27 August. The team is Harvey Byers and Angus Flanagan of Surrey, Harry Goddard of Hertfordshire, Luke Kelly of Lancashire, Thomas Plumb of Dorset, George Saunders of Hampshire, Taylor Stote of Somerset (image copyright Leaderboard Photography), and James Wilson of Durham. The match against Scotland will be played at Dalmahoy on 26-27 September and the match against Ireland follows a fortnight later on the weekend of 10-11 October at Templepatrick. The teams for these will be announced later. The players: Harvey Byers, 16, (Walton Heath) was in last year’s winning team against the Wales U16 side. This season his results include a top 20 finish in the English U16 boys’ championship for the McGregor Trophy Angus Flanagan, 16, (St George’s Hill) was runner-up in the South Eastern junior championship, tied seventh in the Scottish U16s and tied 19th in the McGregor Trophy. Harry Goddard, 15, (Hanbury Manor) tied third in the RB German Junior Masters,  was sixth in the South Eastern junior championship and tied 13th at the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters.   Luke Kelly, 16, (Ashton-under-Lyne) tied 17th in the McGregor Trophy and 21st in the Scottish U16s. He also had a top 20 finish in last year’s North of England U16 championship. Thomas Plumb, 16, (Sherborne) was fifth in the South West Counties U16/U14 championship and tied 20th in the Fairhaven Trophies. He tied 10th in last year’s South of England boys’ open George Saunders, 15, (Meon Valley) tied third in the Sir Henry Cooper Junior Masters and has had a string of consistent results this season. Taylor Stote, 16, (Burnham & Berrow) tied 26th in this year’s English U18 boys’ championship for the Carris Trophy and shared 12th place at the recent Scottish U16 boys’ stroke play. James Wilson, 16, (Tyneside) tied 10th in the Scottish U16 boys’ championship and shared 37th place in the McGregor Trophy.last_img read more

Penn State’s Franklin touts ‘really good plan’

first_imgJames Franklin answers questions from reporters after he was introduced as Penn State’s new football coach during a news conference on Saturday Jan. 11, 2014, in State College, Pa. (AP Photo/John Beale)STATE COLLEGE, Pa. (AP) – James Franklin’s plan on how to be CEO of the Penn State football is in place.Now, so is his coaching staff.Penn State’s 16th football coach, hired Jan. 11 to replace new Houston Texans coach Bill O’Brien, spoke with energy and optimism about the nine-man staff he introduced Friday at Beaver Stadium.Most of the staff worked with Franklin during his three years at Vanderbilt. Eight of the 10 total coaches are from within 340 miles of State College, including four from Pennsylvania.“I feel like we have a really good plan,” said Franklin, who labeled himself as the CEO of Penn State football. “I’m really excited about the staff we’ve been able to put together.“For me, I was looking for familiarity, guys I’ve worked with or known for a very, very long time. Guys that I trust and interact with the players, the community and also have a connection with Penn State from a lot of different perspectives.”Here is the staff:-Bob Shoop, defensive coordinator and safeties coach.-John Donovan, offensive coordinator and tight ends coach.-Charles Huff, special teams coordinator and running backs coach.-Brent Pry, assistant head coach, co-defensive coordinator and linebackers coach.-Josh Gattis, offensive recruiting coordinator and wide receivers coach.-Herb Hand, run game coordinator and offensive line coach.-Ricky Rahne, passing game coordinator and quarterbacks coach.-Sean Spencer, defensive line coach.-Terry Smith, defensive recruiting coordinator and cornerbacks coach.Terry Smith (Courier File Photo)Smith was a wide receiver for Penn State from 1988-91 and enjoyed a successful coaching career at Gateway High School in suburban Pittsburgh before one year of college coaching at Temple. Franklin, Pry and Shoop join Smith as Pennsylvania natives.Franklin has been concentrating on his incoming recruiting class. He said he and the staff will get down to actual football after Feb. 5 when signed national letters of intent become binding.“Recruiting is so important and it’s important to have guys with strong ties to this region; I feel like we’ve done that,” Franklin said. “We will not have one guy on this staff I don’t feel will be an excellent recruiter.His staff, Franklin said, will consist of “smart guys” and “talented people.”“I want to surround myself with people who are loyal, loyal to Penn State, loyal to James Franklin and fired up about being here because this is one of the more unique opportunities in college football,” he said.Franklin said Donovan “more than likely” would be the sideline play-caller.“John called every single play over the last three years at Vanderbilt,” Franklin said.The 41-year-old head coach pointed out that any depth chart before fall practice will be based entirely on seniority.“The most important thing is these kids all start with a clean slate and they have opportunity to earn starting jobs,” he said.“There are no returning starters at any position . at any position. Every single day these guys are going to wake up and they’re going to earn their job. We’re going to create the most competitive experience we possibly can.”Aside from a busy recruiting schedule, Franklin has met with players – current and former. He stressed that he and his staff will “show tremendous respect for our traditions and for our history and for our past” at Penn State.Franklin’s staff will be the third set of coaches for some Penn State players, dating to Joe Paterno’s final season in 2011 and O’Brien’s 2012 and 2013 stay.“The players have embraced the change,” Franklin said. “We want to build relationships and trust and chemistry and build stability with them. This program had stability for a very, very long time, and it’s important to get back to that.”last_img read more

FOREIGN TOURISTS FLOOD INTO DONEGAL AS COUNTY SIZZLES AGAIN IN 24C SUMMER HEAT

first_imgCarrickfin BeachDONEGAL and visitors to the county can look forward to temperatures soaring to 24C this weekend, as more and more foreign tourists flood into the county.Bus loads of tourists from across Europe and America are in Donegal this weekend.Four coaches with French tourists arrived in the county yesterday, many of them spending a sunshine-filled day at Glenveagh National Park. The new trend in tourists from mainland Europe and America coming to Donegal is thanks to a huge marketing push by Failte Ireland.The French tourists are here as part of a ‘Two Irelands’ tour – taking in the north of the country.Coach loads of tourists from Germany, Italy and the USA arrive in Letterkenny today and are booked into the Mount Errigal Hotel in the town.Their presence is adding to the increase in summer visitors from the North and Britain. “It’s a fantastic boost for Donegal,” said Carolynne Harrison from the Mount Errigal.“We are definitely seeing an increase in the number of different nationalities now coming regularly to Donegal.“We’re packed out this weekend with visitors from Italy, Germany and America all staying here.” FOREIGN TOURISTS FLOOD INTO DONEGAL AS COUNTY SIZZLES AGAIN IN 24C SUMMER HEAT was last modified: June 8th, 2013 by BrendaShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:donegaldonegal daily weatherFailte IrelandletterkennyMount Errigal Hoteltouristslast_img read more

2010 and the craft of the possible

first_img17 October 2008Spare a thought for the thousands of South Africans – and Africans – who are creating (and stockpiling) World Cup-themed products.Young KwaZulu-Natal artist Sicelo Ziqubu is creating 2010-themed papier-mache decorated thrones which are being snapped up.The Witness: Paper throneTomas Majebe from Cameroon is making a “small fortune” selling his oil-on-canvas 2010 stadium paintings at flea markets. In Garangkuwa, north of Pretoria, Peter Malherbe has spent thousands of hours building model 2010 stadiums out of – wait for it – matchsticks.In Nelspruit, Zimbabwean Wallace Marino uses beads and wire to craft his stadiums. Pretoria jeweller Ceciwe Khonje has launched a range of (Fifa-approved) 2010 white gold cufflinks.A Port Elizabeth-based ostrich hide exporter has sealed a deal with a Mexican to have soccer boots made out of ostrich leather.In Cape Town, Michael Souter heads a team of workers from an informal settlement who make 2010-themed makarabas, the hard hats worn by construction workers and – with colourful variations – South African soccer fans.And let’s not forget the vuvuzelas which have been given the green light by Fifa and will be heard around the world come June 2010.Fifa has repeatedly advised South Africans to “think outside the box” when trying to capitalise on the 2009 Confederations Cup and 2010 World Cup.“European and English fans won’t want to buy 2010 memorabilia, they will want to buy something African to remind them of the good time they had here,” says Fifa media officer Delia Fischer. “SA must decide what it wants to show the world.”And 2010 Local Organising Committee CEO Danny Jordaan says the 2010 World Cup must showcase African flair – both on and off the field.Not everyone is going to cash in on this sporting spectacle, but with South Africa’s unofficial unemployment rate hovering at around 30%, the informal sector is likely to play an important role in ensuring that the World Cup will be remembered for years to come.Urquhart is a former Fifa World Cup media officer and the current editor of Project 2010last_img read more

The Tour de Kruger: a wild ride

first_imgThe Tour de Kruger takes bikers on a70-kilometre ride every day for five days,through pristine African bushveld. A close encounter with elephants.(Image: Children in the Wilderness)Fiona McIntosh“You’re going to cycle for five days through wild game reserves?” exclaimed my friends when I told them of the bush adventure that I’d just discovered. “Are you crazy? What about the elephants? And the lions? You’ve clearly got a death wish.”But I could think of nothing more exciting than getting up close and personal with the big herds of elephant, buck and other game of the southern African bush. As for seeing lion … we’d be lucky.I’d signed up for the annual mountain-bike tour that supports the Children in the Wilderness programme. Our route would take us from northern Tuli Game Reserve in Botswana, through the World Heritage Site of Mapungubwe, finishing up in the Pafuri concession of the Kruger National Park.It was a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity – where else in the world can you ride for five days through wilderness, knowing that at any moment you might encounter one of the big five? This was to be a real immersion in Africa yet, outside South Africa, the tour seemed to be a well-kept secret. I suspected a conspiracy – the locals didn’t want foreigners snapping up the limited places!Previous tours had been held in the Great Limpopo Transfrontier Park, through western Mozambique and the Pafuri concession of northern Kruger, but this route from the Tuli block approached Pafuri from the west, so was entirely new ground even for tour veterans.Most riders took advantage of the transfers laid on from Johannesburg, hopping on their bikes at the reserve gate to stretch their legs on the final few kilometres to camp. We spent our first night under canvas next to the airstrip and were treated to the impressive sight of a classic aircraft, a shiny DC-3, swooping in to collect some of the reserve’s guests. Our kit bags, numbers and detailed race manifest were waiting on arrival and, once we’d labelled and parked our bikes, we were guided to our tents, all neatly numbered into respective groups.Then it was time for the pre-race briefing. We were out to have fun, but there were ground rules designed to ensure our safety. I’ll admit to being a bit nervous as we rode to camp, but now my fears about riding through elephant country the next day were allayed.Each group of 15 or so riders would stick together as a tight unit behind an experienced, rifle-toting front guide. The back guide was also trained in the ways of the bush and was in constant radio contact with the front guide, the other groups and HQ. They carried satellite phones just in case there was no radio contact. I slept well that night. This was one well-organised operation.Close encountersThe importance of the tight drill was soon evident. After a long, 70-kilometre day in the saddle we were less than five kilometres from the South African border and our camp. The thought of a cold beer was putting new life into my weary legs. Suddenly our lead guide stopped in his tracks.“Over there,” he whispered. Just about to cross the track we were following was a big breeding herd of elephant – females with tiny calves that looked as if they were going to be stomped upon any minute. It was not a happy group. They’d clearly sensed our presence, and were becoming increasingly anxious.“There’s another group in the trees to our right,” whispered the guide. “We’ll back off.” Suddenly loud trumpeting and the crashing of branches broke the silence of the bush and we mounted our bikes and fled back to the nearest group of big trees. So close, and yet so far: the herd was between us and camp, so we retraced our route until we found a safe place to cross the sandy riverbed.Some of the guides from an earlier group were sitting out in a hide on the South African bank as we took off our shoes and carried our bikes across the narrow channel of the Limpopo.“Was that you the elephant were revving?” they laughed. “We heard all the commotion then saw a load of riders retreating at speed.” I’d been praying for some intimate bush encounters, but that was a trifle too exciting for my liking.Mountain-bike countryThat was our third encounter with elephant that day. We’d also been treated to sightings of giraffe, impala, scuttling warthog and a ridiculously raucous display of snorting and histrionics from the clowns of the bush, a big herd of galloping wildebeest, as we followed the game trails through the mopane forest.It’s classic mountain-bike country, with wide open spaces and a seemingly endless network of single track – the work of elephant matriarchs carving out paths for their young to follow down to the water sources.The paths weaved through dense sections of bush, forcing us to bunny-hop over fallen branches and dodge thorn trees. There were a few technical sections – the odd rocky downhill, stretch of sand or loose gravel climb, but on the whole it was easy flowing riding past towering baobabs and over dry, stony riverbeds.This part of southern Africa is not only famous for its elephant, but is rich in history and home to important paleontological remains such as the dinosaur footprints of Vhembe in South Africa and the dinosaur skeletons of Sentinel in Zimbabwe. Our second night was spent at Mapungubwe – a place as seeped in history as it is prolific in game.The camp was in an incredible spot high up on an escarpment, and the dramatic rock formations of the park glowed in the late sun as we walked to the viewpoint where a bar had been set up.We toasted surviving the first day and our unscheduled detour from the route. It was an atmospheric place. Below us was the confluence of the Limpopo and Shashe rivers and the point where Zimbabwe, Botswana and South Africa meet. Now that the day visitors had left we had the park to ourselves, and I began to appreciate the privilege of being part of the tour.Bush cuisineAlthough you ride hard by day, Tour de Kruger is a charity ride to raise funds for Children in the Wilderness, not a race. Groups are arranged according to rider ability and fitness with the speed freaks and the odd professional cyclist breaking the trail and social riders like myself bring up the rear. The emphasis is on enjoying the bush, game sightings and the bush cuisine – a legendary feature of the tour.You can easily gain weight over the five days despite cycling around 75 kilometres a day in the hot sun. After the first 25 to 35 kilometres of each day there’s a morning tea stop where encouraging Wilderness Safaris staff hand out copious quantities of fruitcake, muffins, hot-cross buns, biltong and sweets, as well as wetwipes, sunscreen, lube and tender loving care.Lunch is a proper cooked meal, and then there’s another tea stop before you reach camp, where, if you’re still hungry, another cooked lunch awaits. And the spoiling continues once you’ve finished for the day, with abundant quantities of energy drinks, massage and bike repair services, hot showers, a bar and a slap-up dinner.MapungubweDay two took us through the impressive koppies of Mapungubwe National Park. The archaeological site of Mapungubwe was discovered in 1932, unearthing a long history of human habitation in the region including the earliest recorded archaeological gold in southern Africa.Among the human remains were golden ornaments, gold beads and wire jewellery. The most famous find was that of a single-horned golden rhinoceros. All southern African rhinos have two horns, so this find has intrigued archaeologists – some of whom suggest that it’s a representation of a rhino from Asia, where one-horned species exist. As you ride through the park you can’t help being somewhat overawed by this incredible place.For the second half of the day we cruised the sandy tracks of a privately owned section of the park, the Venetia Limpopo Nature Reserve, a De Beers property which is well stocked with big game and an integral component of the World Heritage Site.Our camp that night was on the Limpopo River, a truly glorious setting right on the sandy cliff. We sat listening to the soothing sound of running water as we sipped our sundowners then ate out under the stars. The handful of foreign riders couldn’t believe the beauty of the African bush – the tour had exceeded all their expectations.The next day started with a rollercoaster ride along the river cliff – some of the most demanding riding of the event with steep down- and uphills. The rising sun created a dappled effect in the trees and we flew along, happy, if a trifle saddle-sore. That afternoon we rode into Kruger National Park, through a back gate and into an area that visitors to the park do not see.We were now in serious big five country. The briefing had been fierce – stick together at all costs and keep moving. The final day through the Pafuri Concession was magnificent. We left our bikes at the tea-stop and climbed up to Lanner Gorge for a view out over the gorge cut in the Luvuvu River. The sight of the great chasm was worth every ounce of energy expended on the 6.4-kilometre sandy trail.We rode through great forests of glowing fever trees, enjoyed the antics of baboons and saw kudu, impala, warthog as well as some great sightings of tuskers in Elephant Alley.Our final detour was to Crooks Corner – the point where South Africa, Zimbabwe and Mozambique meet. We watched a breeding herd of elephant come down to the water to drink then, once they’d left, scrambled down onto the sand bank for a team photo keeping a wary eye open for crocs.Early in the afternoon we arrived at Pafuri Camp where, in the usual slick manner to which we’d been accustomed, our bikes were taken off to be loaded onto the appropriate transfer vehicles – back to the start in Tuli, the Wilderness offices in Joburg or, for those with flights the following evening, onto the coaches that were taking us back the next day.Taking leaveClean and refreshed, we lounged around the camp watching buck graze next to the raised platforms of the tented rooms and elephant drinking in the river. The event ended with a slide show and presentation and we relived the thrills and spills.It had been a magnificent ride that had brought together people from all walks of life, united in their wish to intimately experience the African bush, to rise to the challenge of the ride and to support Children in the Wilderness. It was hard to leave – after five days together the members of each cycling group and the support staff had become a close-knit family.So was I mad to sign up? Well, it certainly wasn’t a walk in the park, but anyone who’s reasonably fit and with a bit of mountain-biking experience would enjoy the ride. The distances are manageable for recreational bikers, and the presence of guides and technicians means that you can seek assistance in the event of bike problems, or hop in a back-up vehicle if you’ve had enough for the day.The organisers go out of their way to make your life as easy and as much fun as possible. But for all that it’s a challenging ride, largely along fairly straightforward single track or dirt road with a few more tricky sections to amuse the downhill addicts – most of which I walked, and felt no shame.What makes the ride really special is the opportunity to journey through bits of the reserves that most visitors never see. You can help but feel privileged that these areas have been opened up for the tour to come through. Makes me want to get on my bike again.Related articlesSouth Africa’s national parksThe adventure starts hereThe biggest nature park in the world Holidays that save the worldTracking elephants across AfricaUseful linksChildren in the WildernessWilderness SafarisKruger National Parklast_img read more

Promoting women’s voices on HIV/Aids

first_imgZeenat Abdool, SABC radio Channel AfricaTanja Bencun, SABC Digital NewsBianca Capazorio, Weekend ArgusEuline Fillis, SABC’s FOKUSMukelwa Hlatshwayo, eTVSibongile Mashaba, SowetanSipho Masombuka, The TimesIna Skosana, The New AgeBibi-Aisha Wadvalla, SciDevNomsa Zwane, Alex FM 1 June 2012 Eight of South Africa’s media houses have teamed up with the International Women’s Media Fund (IWMF) to improve their coverage of issues around HIV/Aids, the Washington-based organisation announced last week. This will be achieved through the organisation’s HIV/Aids investigative reporting fellowship, which was established in South Africa in 2011 to fill the gap in reporting about HIV/Aids. The programme is supported by the MAC Aids Fund. “HIV/Aids has had a devastating impact in South Africa, with more than 500 000 new infections each year and 1.2-million children orphaned as a result of Aids,” the IWMF’s Nadine Hoffman said in a statement. “Yet mainstream media coverage of the epidemic has been characterised by a lack of urgency, failure to examine the reasons behind stigma and denial, and inadequate engagement with people living with the disease,” she said. Women, in particular, are excluded from the discourse even though they are disproportionately affected by the disease. The second batch of journalists participating in the fellowship represent some of South Africa’s biggest media houses and come from various backgrounds, including print and broadcast. “Selected fellows will receive advanced training and coaching to produce innovative, high-quality investigative reporting on the complex, under-reported issues surrounding HIV/Aids, reflecting women’s voices and concerns,” Hoffman said. “Each will produce three to four investigations for their news organisations as part of the IWMF programme.” The 10 journalists taking part in the 2012 fellowship are:center_img These journalists will be following in the footsteps of the 2011 fellows, who produced over 30 investigative pieces covering issues such as HIV/Aids in the military, the spread of the diseases through rape in prisons, HIV among sex workers and the role of medical male circumcision in preventing the disease. This fellowship is only one that the IWMF runs. The IWMF was founded in 1990 as a non- profit organisation to strengthen the position and role of women in news media around the world. It has a network of both men and women working in the news media in over 130 countries and has conducted successful programmes in 25 countries. SAinfo reporterlast_img read more

New agriculture practices being standardized

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It’s been a year since a harmful algal bloom in the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) was brought to national attention when the City of Toledo’s water supply was shut down due to toxins entering its water intake. Record-setting rainfall leading up to the hottest days of summer this year has renewed concerns regarding the quality of Ohio’s rivers, lakes and streams, with forecasts for the bloom to surge in the Great Lake.A variety of potential contributors have been cited for the blooms, including sewage overflow and malfunctioning septic systems, among others. But nutrient runoff from farm fields has drawn the most attention. Phosphorus-based fertilizer is an elemental nutrient needed to help crops grow, but in recent years has made its way into nearby waters after heavy rains.“Though less phosphorus is being applied with increasing efficiency, farmers and agribusinesses in the Western Lake Erie Basin recognize their responsibility to go further to find a solution,” said Chris Henney, president and CEO of the Ohio AgriBusiness Association (OABA). “For the better part of the past two years, swift action has been taken to support education, research and outreach aimed at curbing runoff.”OABA, whose membership includes manufacturers, suppliers and applicators of phosphorus-based fertilizers and other crop nutrients, is one entity partnering with a variety of agriculture and environmental groups, researchers and experts to champion farming practices that improve water quality across the state for the long haul. The association is also a strong supporter of recent Ohio legislation that prohibits application of fertilizers when conditions are most conducive to runoff, and which calls for nutrient applicators across the state to be certified.As administrator of the 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program, OABA, along with key partners such as The Nature Conservancy, The Fertilizer Institute and more, coordinates the education, training, implementation and third-­party auditing for the application of nutrients using the 4R principles of nutrient stewardship.The 4R principles help farmers and agribusinesses take a unified approach to nutrient stewardship by using the right fertilizer source at the right rate, the right time and in the right place.Launched in March 2014, the program has exceeded early goals and expectations. As of late July, the completely voluntary program has recognized 16 certified facilities that service more than 3,000 farm clients and 1.1 million acres of farmland, with commitments from 50 more facilities to become certified.What’s more promising, according to 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program Executive Director Andrew Allman, is that the efforts aren’t just limited to the WLEB. More than 477,000 acres of farmland outside of the WLEB are serviced by retailers and applicators certified through the program.“This shows a serious level of commitment and dedication the industry is taking across the state to help clean up all of its waters, not just Lake Erie,” Allman said.Nationally, The Fertilizer Institute’s 4R Research Fund provides needed resource support with a focus on measuring and documenting the economic, social and environmental impacts of 4R nutrient stewardship.The fund has awarded projects across the country, including $1.2 million last July toward a project that will evaluate the 4R nutrient stewardship concepts in the WLEB by monitoring, modeling and measuring their impacts at the field, watershed and lake scales.“We all live, work, play and drink from Ohio’s water sources, and we all play a role in keeping them clean and safe,” Henney said. “We’re proud of the work we’re doing and the commitment we have to improving our resources for future generations.”Click here to download the 4R infographic.last_img read more

How to Handle This Political Season at Work

first_imgIt’s political season again. People are going to be talking about the election and, as always, there are going to be sharp disagreements. For your part, here is how you should handle this political season at work.You Aren’t Going to Change MindsDon’t argue with your peers at work about politics. You are every bit as likely to change your co-worker’s long held political beliefs as you are having yours changed—and you aren’t going to have your mind changed, now are you?Your co-workers with different political opinions aren’t going to understand your view, and you aren’t going to understand theirs. Your co-workers are entitled to their stupid, shortsighted, pig-headed, partisan opinions, and you are equally entitled to yours.Don’t try to change minds at work.Remember, You Have More In CommonRegardless of your political beliefs or party affiliation, you are joined together with your co-workers by all that you have in common. There is more that binds you together than separates you, even if you have very different and very strong political opinions.Your co-workers are important to you. These are the people you spend a lot of time with, and this is the team that produces results for your clients with you. Rancorous political arguments don’t bring you closer together, and sometimes they pull you apart. Attacks can get personal. Feelings are unnecessarily hurt.Your relationships with your co-workers are too important to allow them to be damaged by politic opinions. When politics are discussed, be civil. Don’t attack your co-worker’s political opinions.You Aren’t Rush Limbaugh or John StewartYou don’t get paid to entertain people with your political opinions. Leave the professional political entertaining to the professional political entertainers.Your Results Aren’t Tied to PoliticsUnless you work in politics, your results aren’t going to be improved or reduced by the outcome of this year’s election. You alone are responsible for your results, and you will succeed or fail based on your efforts.For those brave enough to accept the truth, successful people find a way to be successful regardless of the political party in power. They don’t allow themselves to believe that the outcome of an election can prevent them from succeeding.The successful know that they make their own economy. Instead of arguing with your peers at work, make your own economy.Your Clients Need Never KnowYour political opinions and beliefs alienate half of the people that come in contact with them. My personal political opinions frustrate a far greater percentage than half. But you don’t see my political opinions plastered on this blog. There is a reason for that.If this blog were a vehicle for my political opinions, some people that disagree with my politics would dismiss the rest of my message here. My goals here have nothing to do with politics and everything to do with sales, sales management, business, leadership, and success. My goal here is to empower salespeople and business people with ideas.Your goals, like mine, have nothing to do with politics. Your clients need never know your politics. You can assume that your clients have strong political opinions too, and there is no reason to have your message or motive questioned over your political opinions.(If your Facebook or LinkedIn page is a long line of vitriolic political rants and pictures, consider taking them down).A Final ThoughtNone of this is to suggest that you shouldn’t participate in this experiment that is our great, messy, Democratic Republic.If you and your co-worker’s disagree without being disagreeable, by all means, discuss your thoughts and ideas. But that means you have to be thoughtful and mature, and you have to prevent people who aren’t from engaging in your conversation. It’s your responsibility not to stir the pot.If you want to make a difference, work for your candidates and your party. Get involved in the process. But don’t try to make that difference where you work.QuestionsWhy shouldn’t you engage in vitriolic political arguments at work?Why don’t you need your clients to know your strong political beliefs? What do you risk?Have you ever really changed your co-worker’s political opinions or had yours changed?How can you make your own economy? How can you run your own campaign to get the results you really need. Essential Reading! Get my first book: The Only Sale Guide You’ll Ever Need “The USA Today bestseller by the star sales speaker and author of The Sales Blog that reveals how all salespeople can attain huge sales success through strategies backed by extensive research and experience.” Buy Nowlast_img read more