Two can’t miss webinars: Dan Heath and Guy Kawasaki!

first_imgNetwork for Good has two amazing webinars coming up – and (as usual) they are free with registration.*Nonprofit 911: How to Get More Followers on Social Media w/ Guy KawasakiThursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. EasternWhy isn’t your hashtag everywhere? When’s the best time for a Facebook status update? What does it mean when someone +1’s you on Google +? How come no one liked your picture, story, update, tweet, share, friendship, etc? You might be caught a social media slump!Tune in Thursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear tech and social media expert Guy Kawasaki lead a free presentation giving nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via the most popular social media platforms.Register here.Nonprofit 911: The Decisive Organization: Building a Culture of Better Decision-MakingMonday, March 25 at 1 p.m. EasternBest-selling Switch author Dan Heath’s done it again! Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work hits shelves next week. He’s going to stop by and pre-release the most helpful decision-making practices to the Network for Good audience via a Nonprofit 911 webinar on Monday, the 25th at 1 p.m. Eastern. Join Dan Heath as he makes it easier for your organization to make that sound decision. Bonus: Dan will be giving away a free copy of his new book to 10 lucky nonprofits on the call.Register here.*If you can’t make the date for Guy Kawasaki, sign up anyway. You will get a recording of the webinar afterward! Dan Heath’s session is live only, so we won’t be sending recordings.last_img read more

The magic two words that will get people to retweet you

first_imgDan Zarrella is one of my favorite thinkers on social media, because he mines massive amounts of data and bases his recommendations on hard science. This is relatively rare yet needed in the field of social media marketing, and so he’s well worth following.He recently analyzed 2.7 million tweets and concluded the following that people retweet when they are asked nicely as part of the original tweet. Conclusion? If you have something you want people to spread, ask them – with a pretty please.last_img

Fear Factor: Help Your Board Conquer Fundraising Phobias

first_img“Fundraising is the F-word to many board members.” —Gail Perry, Fired Up Fundraising It’s all too common for board members to avoid fundraising for your nonprofit because it can cause a lot of anxiety—even downright fear. We asked Rachel Muir, vice president of training at Pursuant and founder of Girlstart, to share how you can reframe some common fundraising fears to help your board members feel confident every time they make an ask. Fear: If a donor gives to our organization, it might hurt them in some way. Truth: The world is full of generous people who want to give. The wrong approach to fundraising is feeling like you’re taking something away from someone. Encourage your board members to believe in abundance. We don’t have to look any farther than the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, which raised $220 million. Before the challenge, that $220 million was sitting in people’s pockets and bank accounts, but that challenge inspired people to give. Fear: I’ll be rejected and fail. Truth: Ninety-five percent of the ask is what leads up to it. Think about a marriage proposal. You pretty much know the answer before the words are spoken out loud. It’s not how the question is asked; it’s all the work you did beforehand to build the relationship. That’s what gets you to yes, and it’s the same in fundraising. It’s what happens before the solicitation that brings a person to give. Getting a meeting with a donor, for example, is a very positive indicator. People won’t agree to a meeting unless they’re highly likely to make a gift. Ideally, you’ve been cultivating this person appropriately. It’s important for your board to remember that. The ask feels like the hardest or scariest part, but the real ask is all the work that happened before your board member invites the donor to contribute. Fear: I don’t want to put someone on the spot. Truth: Giving is a joyous experience that feels good to the donor. This fact is so important to remind your board. According to a recent donor engagement study from ABILA, donors feel the most engaged and connected to your cause when they’re making a gift. As donors, we tend think about how the person on the receiving end will feel. We’re excited about the organization opening the mail and finding our check. If we’re giving online, we’re excited about the nonprofit receiving the email announcing our donation. It just feels good to give. Ultimately, it comes down to reminding board members that they’re simply sharing their passion for your cause. They’re offering people an opportunity to make a real impact in the world. There is much to be given, and there is much to be had. Want more great advice from Rachel Muir to help your board members become fundraising superstars? Download the complete Nonprofit 911 webinar, “10 Tips to Get Your Board Fundraising in One Hour,” right now!last_img read more

Quality of Antenatal Care in Zambia: A National Assessment

first_imgPosted on January 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth recently published an article, Quality of antenatal care in Zambia: A national assessment, that classified and assessed the level of ANC services in health facilities in Zambia.Take a look at the abstract:BackgroundAntenatal care (ANC) is one of the recommended interventions to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. Yet in most Sub-Saharan African countries, high rates of ANC coverage coexist with high maternal and neonatal mortality. This disconnect has fueled calls to focus on the quality of ANC services. However, little conceptual or empirical work exists on the measurement of ANC quality at health facilities in low-income countries. We developed a classification tool and assessed the level of ANC service provision at health facilities in Zambia on a national scale and compared this to the quality of ANC received by expectant mothers.MethodsWe analysed two national datasets with detailed antenatal provider and user information, the 2005 Zambia Health Facility Census and the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), to describe the level of ANC service provision at 1,299 antenatal facilities in 2005 and the quality of ANC received by 4,148 mothers between 2002 and 2007.ResultsWe found that only 45 antenatal facilities (3%) fulfilled our developed criteria for optimum ANC service, while 47% of facilities provided adequate service, and the remaining   50% offered inadequate service. Although 94% of mothers reported at least one ANC visit with a skilled health worker and 60% attended at least four visits, only 29% of mothers received good quality ANC, and only 8% of mothers received good quality   ANC and attended in the first trimester.ConclusionsDHS data can be used to monitor “effective ANC coverage” which can be far below ANC coverage as estimated by current indicators. This “quality gap” indicates missed opportunities at ANC for delivering effective interventions. Evaluating the level of ANC provision at health facilities is an efficient way to detect where deficiencies are located in the system and could serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate country progress.Access the PDF of the article here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

GMHC2013: Stay Tuned to the Live-stream!

first_imgPosted on January 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference is right around the corner! In an effort to engage a broad audience, the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the three plenaries will be live-streamed and archived. In addition, all conference sessions will be archived and available for viewing within 24 hours of presentation time.Stay tuned to www.gmhc2013.com to access the live-stream and archived videos.View the conference program here.About the conference:GMHC2013 is a technical conference for practitioners, scientists, researchers, and policy-makers to network, share knowledge, and build on progress toward eradicating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by improving the quality of maternal health care.The conference is co-sponsored by Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the Maternal Health Task Force at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.GMHC2013 will be held at the Arusha International Conference Center in Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013.Interested in guest blogging?Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! The MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about the issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are interested in sharing a guest post, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to post on your own blog or your organization’s blog. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Join the conversation on Twitter! #GMHC2013Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The Need for Malaria Integration in Maternal and Newborn Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 11, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The release of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership’s report, “The Contribution of Malaria Control to Maternal and Newborn Health,” made yesterday, July 10th, 2014, an important day for malaria in pregnancy research and programming. Pregnancy was previously identified as a particularly vulnerable time to contract malaria for both mom and baby, but this is the first time the RBM Partnership has released a thematic report specifically dedicated to how malaria affects pregnant women and their newborns.The report was launched during the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in New York by UN health and development leaders. The purpose of the report launch was to forge new partnerships and strengthen existing ones to expand malaria services to one of the most vulnerable populations, pregnant women.An existing solution, with poor deliveryIntermittent preventative treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) have long been the standard for malaria prevention in pregnancy. In 2012, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated these standards by increasing the number of IPTp doses to four during pregnancy. This treatment, delivered during antenatal care (ANC), has existed for decades, but delivery is still poor. Although 77% of pregnant women receive at least one ANC visit in most countries, rates of IPTp and ITN use by pregnant women fall far below global and national targets.Why is malaria prevention part of maternal health?Malaria is both a direct and indirect cause of maternal mortality. Each year 10,000 pregnant women die of malaria infection. In addition, malaria is a major cause of anemia,  which  puts a woman at greater risk for post-partum hemorrhage, the number one cause of maternal death. WHO’s recommended treatment, four doses of IPTp and use of an ITN, can reduce severe maternal anemia by 38% and perinatal mortality by 27%. The treatment’s effectiveness plays a significant role in leading global progress on decreasing maternal mortality. But malaria prophylaxis saves not only women’s lives, but newborn lives as well.Protecting health before birthIPTp and use of ITNs can reduce a newborn’s risk of dying from malaria by 18% in the first 28 days of life; it also provides a 21% decrease in low birth weight, a risk factor for neonatal death. Every year, 75,000 to 200,000 infants die because of a  malaria infection during pregnancy. Also, an additional 100,000 neonatal deaths, or 11% of global neonatal mortality, are due to low birth weight resulting from Plasmodium falciparum, or malaria, infections in pregnancy.Although scale-up of IPTp and ITNs did not meet the global coverage target of 80%, malaria prevention efforts between 2009 and 2012 saved about 94,000 newborns. If global targets had been met, this number could have tripled, with 300,000 neonatal deaths prevented. In addition to preventing neonatal deaths, IPTp and ITNs can reduce miscarriages and stillbirths by 33%.Next stepsAlthough the WHO has given clear guidelines through Focused Antenatal Care (FANC), there is often fragmentation across ANC delivery platforms. Fragmentation makes it difficult to effectively deliver prophylactic malaria interventions through ANC. Solutions to this problem include integration of both funding and service-delivery for malaria, ANC, and maternal health interventions. In addition, countries must harmonize malaria control and maternal health efforts in national policies, guidelines, and funding. Malaria prevention is not just an addendum to current maternal and newborn health interventions, it ensures maternal and newborn health.  With integration we can save lives.Share this:last_img read more

“Taking Measure of Growth Charts” Published in The Wall Street Journal

first_imgPosted on December 22, 2014October 28, 2016By: Alison Chatfield, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Are newborn growth charts one size fits all? Are growth charts developed based on how babies in the U.S. have grown in the past applicable in the U.S. today, or to countries around the world? Is it possible to create truly global standards for how a baby should grow?These are the questions at the heart of a new article published in The Wall Street Journal by Jo Craven McGrinty. Current practice has physicians assess a newborn’s weight and length against growth charts generated from data on previous births in the country they live in. This practice could work if a country’s population is completely healthy, and therefore provides an optimal standard for comparison. But, if it isn’t, then using population-specific standards can lead to certain characteristics of poor growth becoming institutionalized. What is needed are growth standards that provide an indication of how babies should grow under optimal conditions, rather than comparing growth to how babies have grown in the past.Enter, the INTERGROWTH-21st Project. The INTERGROWTH-21st Project has created globally validated growth standards that provide a universal norm of how babies shouldgrow under optimal conditions. By including approximately 60,000 healthy women from eight countries in the study, the project was able to develop true norms for fetal growth and newborn size that can be used in any country.Like the WHO Child Growth Standards before it, the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are poised to replace national-level growth references that describe how babies have grown in the past. The article ends on a forward-looking note, acknowledging that the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are just one of several assessment tools that are needed to inform interventions to improve maternal and newborn health, “but measurements pegged to good health are a start,” McGrinty concludes.The full article can be found at the Wall Street Journal.This article was reposted from the INTERGROWTH-21st blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

How to Train Providers Where Maternal Mortality is Highest

first_imgPosted on February 13, 2015October 28, 2016By: Atziri Ramírez Negrin, Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and ResearchClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In Mexico, maternal mortality continues to be a public health problem. Throughout the country, the burden of maternal mortality varies greatly between different locations. The three states with the highest maternal mortality ratio are Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas. The main causes of maternal mortality continue to be hypertensive pregnancy disorders and postpartum haemorrhage.Medical interns practice management of postpartum hemorrhageIn order to help meet the needs of these underserved and high-burdened states, newly graduated medical students are required to oversee a low-income community for an internship year after completing medical school. However, this means that the most inexperienced clinicians are caring for the most vulnerable with restricted access to other medical assistance.Based on these worrisome facts, the director of community service at the National University and I decided to organize a three-day course covering pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) for the soon-to-be doctors of the most affected areas in Mexico. We hosted 160 students, which was a big challenge, but an encouraging one.The first day a very important question was posed to the medical students: “How many of you have seen a woman die from postpartum haemorrhage?” The answer was shocking: half of the medical students had witnessed a maternal death caused by PPH during their short practice.The students were trained using both e-learning modules and hands-on experience. The PPH and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia e-learning modules were created by the Oxford Maternal and Perinatal Health Institute and Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER). The three hands-on PPH simulations were key to solidifying knowledge presented in the e-learning modules.At the first station, students practiced risk factor assessments and bleeding measurement. A series of clinical cases were posed where risk factors were reviewed. Also, students were handed gauzes and compresses soaked in red liquid to practice assessing what different quantities of blood looked like.At the second station, students learned how to build a low cost balloon for uterine tamponade with condoms and Foley catheters. They then practiced inserting the balloon in a pelvis model to treat simulated PPH.At the last station, participants were faced with a delivery patient model where they assisted a delivery, practiced shoulder dystocia maneuvers, implemented the active management of the third stage of labour and followed a PPH protocol, which included pharmacological strategies.Students were asked if they considered the training course interesting and useful and the answer was an overwhelming, yes! Ninety six percent considered it very useful and interesting. One of the most curious comments during the feedback was that although students considered the training adequate for their skill level, 50% thought it should have been given much earlier, since the skills were needed for many cases during medical school.Overall the course participants and staff had a great time. Hopefully this will become a routine course every year and perhaps available to all medical school students before they finish their career!Any comments or suggestions, please feel free to e-mail the author at:atziriok@yahoo.comShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Rezarta Haxhillari

first_imgRezarta joined the NFG family as Director of Customer Experience. She is passionate about making an impact and giving back in any way she can. Her goal is to empower nonprofits so they can “do more good” in their communities. Rezarta is a seasoned traveler and has been all around the world! In her free time, you can catch Rezarta watching The Bachelor franchise and planning her next adventure!“I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine.”Q&A with Rezarta Haxhillari, Customer Experience DirectorWhat do you do at Network for Good?I lead our Customer Experience team, which ensures we deliver the best experience possible to all our customers. Our goal is to successfully on-board customers when they first join the NFG family and encourage continued engagement with our products and services throughout their journey with us. By doing so, we are helping them achieve their organizational goals that allow them to “Do More Good” in the communities they serve.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I served as an Executive Director of a nonprofit organization called The Gjergj Kastrioti Scholarship Fund for three years. I now serve on the organization’s Board of Directors. I believe this experience is very valuable for my current role at NFG as I have a deep understanding of the challenges some of our customers may face.What attracts you to nonprofits? I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine. At NFG, we help thousands of nonprofits and charities daily. Consequently, we have an indirect influence on the ability to change people’s lives, which is an incredibly rewarding feeling!What do you enjoy most about your work? I enjoy speaking with our customers and hearing about the milestones and growth they are reaching as a result of using our products and services. I’m a proponent of adding convenience in everyday tasks. So, it’s extremely rewarding to hear when our platform makes their lives easier and helps them become successful.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I love to travel. In fact, I’ve visited over 40 countries! It’s gratifying to visit and learn about new cultures and historical facts unique to each country I visit. When I travel somewhere new, I visit local museums, take part in interesting attractions, and explore the restaurant scene (so much delicious food to be tried!)Lightning RoundDream vacation? Not sure about a dream vacation destination, but a two-week vacation to any new country is always a good idea! During the first week I would tour the city, eat local food, listen to local music and get a sense of the area’s unique characteristics. The second week would be just a period to relax. Maybe a beach in that country? Yes, that sounds like a lovely vacation Most recent book read? I just finished “End Game” by David Baldacci and I would absolutely recommend it if you’re into fast-paced thrillers. I’m also a fan of anything written by James Patterson and John Grisham. All three write quick page-turners!Last movie seen in movie theater? “Green Book”, an Oscar-nominated biographical comedy-dramaTheme song? “Happy” by PharrellFavorite color? FuchsiaAll time favorite athlete? Serena WilliamsRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

WHO Misoprostol Approval Means Lifesaving Treatment for Women in Low-resource Settings

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2015June 12, 2017By: Lindsay Grenier, Maternal Health Technical Advisor, MCSP ; Susan Moffson, MCSP Senior Program OfficerClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post has been slightly edited from it’s original posting on the blog of the Maternal and Child Survival Program.A young woman arrived at a health clinic in Sierra Leone with heavy bleeding. She was suffering from postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)—or excessive bleeding after birth—the most common cause of death for women after delivery.The midwife at the clinic acted quickly, administering oxytocin, a uterotonic that helps the uterus contract to stop the bleeding. However, the facility was lacking the refrigeration needed to properly store the drug, which was also two years out of date. As a result, the oxytocin had no effect, and the woman died two hours later.Mother and newborn in Allahabad, India. (Kate Holt/MCHIP)Tragically, poor and marginalized populations suffering from a disproportionate burden of disease often have the least access to high-quality health services. This is especially true of women during childbirth, who often deliver at home instead of health facilities. Those women who do make it to a facility may find them ill-equipped, lacking skilled personnel and essential medicines. Or, as in the case of the young woman from Sierra Leone, the medicines may be expired and improperly stored, thereby greatly diminishing their effectiveness.Alarmingly, all of these women will be at risk of dying from PPH without access to uterotonics. And while oxytocin is the gold standard for preventing and treating PPH, it is not always available or kept sufficiently cool. It must also be given through injection by a skilled birth attendant, such as a doctor or nurse.Thankfully, there is a second-line uterotonic drug that can be used to prevent and treat PPH when oxytocin is not available: misoprostol. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently added misoprostol — which does not require refrigeration and can be taken as a pill — to the Essential Medicines List for treatment of PPH in every country. This action expands the range of options to treat PPH, empowering health care workers with one more tool in their arsenal to fight bleeding after birth.As professionals who work every day around the world to ensure our interventions reach the most vulnerable populations, and understand the endorsement of misoprostol means more equitable access to and appropriate use of uteronics for countless women across the developing world.The WHO announcement opens an exciting new chapter in global health. While much work remains before every facility can guarantee a stable stock of viable oxytocin, the endorsement of misoprostol for the treatment of PPH will increase the availability of lifesaving care for some of the world’s most vulnerable women.As part of our own comprehensive PPH strategy, MCSP continues to strengthen essential health system functions, with the goal of overcoming local system barriers to provision of high-quality care, effective referral systems, and trained providers.Share this:last_img read more

New Topic Page on Family Planning Now Available

first_imgPhoto: “Fenchuganj Upazila, Sylhet, Bangladesh” © 2011 Shafiqul Alam Kiron/Save the Children, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this: Posted on January 26, 2016August 4, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is proud to bring you a new repository of information on family planning. Our newest topic page, “Integrating Family Planning into Maternal Health,” features an in-depth look at the relationship between family planning and maternal mortality:From 1990 to 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio (MMR) decreased by 44 percent. A drop in the total fertility rate worldwide, due primarily to an increase in contraceptive use, resulted in 1.2 million fewer maternal deaths from 1990 to 2005. However, to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) target of reducing the global MMR to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030, major challenges remain.Use the topic page to learn more about this relationship and to also access the most up-to-date reports, publications, news, and highlights of our work in family planning. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Maternal Health Innovations: Strengthening Quality of Care

first_imgPosted on March 10, 2016October 12, 2016By: Kayla McGowan, Project Coordinator, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)While improving access to maternal and newborn health services is fundamental in reducing the global maternal and neonatal mortality ratios and meeting the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals, ensuring quality care is an equally important aim.The Maternal Health Innovations Fund, a project of the MHTF, recently supported several projects in collaboration with The International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr,b) and Pakistan’s Agha Khan University (AKU) that examined ways to improve quality of care in low- and middle-income countries.Icddr,b and AKU have published 10 knowledge briefs summarizing findings from their recent maternal health research that took place in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Southern Kyrgystan, and Pakistan. The knowledge briefs identify urgent needs in maternal health, highlight improvements in the field, and offer recommendations for addressing gaps in access, quality, and measurement of care based on the implementation research conducted under this project.Three of the projects investigated solutions related to improving the quality of maternal and newborn care:Knowledge Exchange for Health Service Providers:  This study in Bangladesh convened a health services provider club (HSP) consisting of maternal and neonatal health service providers in rural Shahjadpur. The HSP gathered for monthly refresher training sessions and developed an action plan to improve the quality of maternal newborn health services in the sub-district. Pre- and post-intervention research showed significant improvements in antenatal care and postnatal care services, as well as increased essential newborn care practices. Childbirth Checklist: Researchers in Bangladesh found that the World Health Organization’s Safe Childbirth Checklist is a low-cost, effective tool that can improve quality of maternal and newborn health services and thereby increase uptake of facility-based services.Learn more about the Maternal Health Innovations Fund and read the rest of the knowledge briefs >> Share this: Pregnancy, Delivery and Postpartum Care: This study utilized 26 ‘signal functions’ to assess the quality of obstetric and newborn care at six health facilities in Bangladesh.center_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

15 New Jobs in Maternal Newborn Health!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 15, 2016July 28, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in maternal, newborn or reproductive health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaCommunications Director: Population Services International (PSI); Dar-Es-Salaam, TanzaniaCountry Director – Liberia: Jhpiego; LiberiaQuality Improvement Practitioner: Jacaranda Health; Nairobi, KenyaSenior Technical Advisor – Maternal Health and Family Planning: Jhpiego; MaliAsiaClinical Trainers: EngenderHealth; Bihar, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (Delivery Efficiency, Mechanisms, & Financing): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning and Evaluation (Health Coverage, Quality, & Delivery): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaEuropeResearch Fellow in Reproductive & Maternal Health: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; London, EnglandNorth AmericaCommunications and Development Manager: Global Health Media; Waitsfield, VTCommunications Coordinator: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Communications Specialist: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Policy Communications Officer, Advocacy & Public Policy: PATH; Washington, D.C.Program Officer – Zika: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore, MDSpecialist, Communication and Advocacy, Global Health: Save the Children; Washington, D.C.Technical Writer: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C. Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.Share this:last_img read more

Can a Human Centered Design Approach to Group Antenatal Care Improve Women’s Pregnancy and Birth Experiences?

first_imgShare this: Community members share their perceptions of pregnancy and antenatal care and ideas for making visual aids more culturally relevant.While all of these influencers care about the baby’s health, they generally believe the woman’s health is secondary. Our research highlighted the critical need to help community members understand the link between antenatal care and a woman’s and baby’s health.Based on our discussions with community members, we realized the need to emphasize the link between a woman’s health and that of her baby.Co-creating pregnancy clubs with women and providersWhen designing the group antenatal care model in Kenya, as in Uganda, we wanted to ensure that it improved the pregnancy and birth experience of the women participants, while enhancing — not burdening — the workflow of the health care providers. As a result of these discussions, and building on our experience forming groups in Uganda, we engaged women and providers in the creation of the Lea Mimba pregnancy club in Kenya.A calendar contains a health record and useful visuals that help women to track their own and their baby’s health.We adapted the Uganda group antenatal care curriculum to comply with national standards and guidelines for maternal and newborn health while meeting the current World Health Organization recommendations of eight antenatal care contacts. We also incorporated elements of self-care where women participate in taking their weight and recording their blood pressure, and facilitators encouraged women to build relationships and meet with club members outside of group sessions. To support the group model, we collaborated with local midwives and health care staff to develop a package of implementation materials that can be adapted for use in other settings, including a training curriculum; health care provider job aids; visual and tactile materials; supervision and monitoring tools and community engagement tools.Posters, flyers, and aprons were designed to spark public interest in the Lea Mimba Club and its functions.We observed and requested feedback from women and providers who participated in mock pregnancy club sessions. Participants commented on their experiences engaging in or leading the sessions, their understanding of the health topics and the usefulness and relevance of the implementation materials. During these sessions, we noticed that some women were initially quiet, but they became more involved when health care providers told stories or invited participants to sing songs that convey health messages. Women passed around a ball to indicate their turn to speak, and at times, even asked for the ball.After these mock sessions, participants continued to talk about what they learned as they waited for their individual appointments with midwives. They agreed that it would be easiest to attend sessions on market days, and midwives recommended that sessions take place in the afternoon when clinics are less crowded. Midwives noted that the group format also saved them time, as they could share more advice and information than was possible during one-on-one antenatal care appointments. Based on these observations and comments from the mock session participants, we revised the session structure and accompanying materials.Health care providers review the Lea Mimba message scrolls and share their thoughts on the usefulness of these tools.Pregnancy clubs in sessionWe have started pregnancy clubs in six facilities in Kakamega County. Groups comprise eight to 10 women of similar gestational ages, and we emphasize that each club session is a confidential and safe space for women to talk about their pregnancies, even if they are not yet ready to declare their pregnancy to the community.As health facilities host pregnancy clubs, we will continue to engage community members in discussions on the importance of antenatal care for all women and babies and encourage them to refer women to their local Lea Mimba pregnancy club.To learn more about our work, visit msh.org and stay up to date with MSH by subscribing to our email series. Listen to the Lea Mimba Pregnancy Club Song: Lea Mimba Club participants sing a song with the message that healthy pregnancies ensure children’s health. Recording by M4ID.Photo credit: M4ID—This post originally appeared on Medium.Read more about group antenatal care>> Posted on August 22, 2018September 21, 2018By: Priyam Sharda, Design Research Lead for M4ID; Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)“For the first three months, the baby is just blood. There’s nothing there to take care of,” said one Kenyan father-to-be in Kakamega County, Western Kenya, where we were meeting with communities and health care providers to learn about their attitudes toward women’s health, pregnancy and care at health facilities.“A baby is a blessing from God,” said the mother-in-law of a pregnant woman during another community discussion. “He alone knows how it grows.”Using insights from these community discussions, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) worked with M4ID, a social impact design company specializing in development and health, to develop a group antenatal care model that meets the needs of young women, adolescent girls (ages 10–24), and health care providers. With support from the UK’s County Innovation Challenge Fund program, the Lea Mimba project (“take care of your pregnancy” in Swahili) used a human-centered design approach to adapt a successful pregnancy club model that MSH and M4ID developed in the Eastern Ugandan communities of Mbale and Bududa in 2016.center_img M4ID uses human-centered design to create solutions that address health and development challenges. Communities actively engage in each step of the process to ensure that solutions are culturally relevant and meet their needs.From traditional to group antenatal careStarting antenatal care early in pregnancy is critical for protecting the health and wellbeing of women and their babies, but in Western Kenya, only about 20% of pregnant women attend their first visit before the fourth month of pregnancy (DHS 2014). Through antenatal care visits, health care providers can detect and treat pregnancy-related complications, such as pre-eclampsia and anemia, before they become life-threatening. Antenatal care visits provide opportunities for health care providers to encourage women to deliver their babies with the help of skilled birth attendants and to promote breastfeeding and other healthy postnatal behaviors.However, traditional one-on-one antenatal care often does not meet women’s and adolescents’ needs for information, support and high-quality clinical care. In Kakamega County, women often must wake up around 7:00 AM to go to the clinic, only to spend most of their time there in the waiting room. During standard antenatal care visits, providers spend between 10 and 15 minutes with each woman, but adolescents and those who are pregnant for the first time may need additional time to learn and understand health information.In recent years, group care models have emerged in low-income countries as a promising approach to provide high-quality antenatal care and promote social support among women during pregnancy. Women go through pregnancy as a cohort, learning through discussion and building bonds with one other and their antenatal care providers.Community perceptions of pregnancy and health careWe asked community members, potential clients and providers how women experience pregnancy and health care in their communities and how providers deliver that care.Several barriers continue to disrupt women’s and adolescents’ access to care, including a lack of high-quality services and information, limited individual and community awareness and support and low male engagement. Several actors —including recently pregnant peers, midwives, community health volunteers, male partners and mothers-in-law— influence a woman’s decision to use antenatal care services. Peers are an important early source of information, as doctors and other authority figures are considered difficult to approach. Mothers-in-law might uphold traditional, cultural beliefs that prevent suggested behavior change, while male partners provide the money or transportation to visit the clinic. We learned that pregnancy is only socially acknowledged toward the end of the second trimester, which deters women from going a health facility early in their pregnancy. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Wes Morgan declared fit for Newport game

first_imgLeicester City manager Claude Puel has confirmed that defender Wes Morgan has recovered from illness in time to face Newport County in the third round of the FA Cup.Morgan was sidelined for Leicester’s last two games against Cardiff City and Everton, but Puel has confirmed he’s now available for selection when they visit Newport County on Saturday.“Wes came back in training this week with good fitness and he’s available for the game,” the Frenchman told the national media on Friday afternoon,” Puel told the club’s website.“We will see. I don’t want to give all the players who are available for this game! It will be a good team, 18 strong players, with some rotation.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“The players have played a lot [over the festive period] and it’s important to maintain freshness in the team.“We have a squad with players who are close and we need to use all the possibilities of the squad to maintain a good freshness and to compete at a high level in our games.“It’s important to find a good balance between quality, freshness and to maintain this level.”last_img read more

Two Arrested In Connection With Burglary At Kenai Central High School

first_imgLangham: “The total value of the stolen property by Brower and Gordon was greater than $750 and less than $25,000.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Police Department have arrested two individuals in connection with a break in and burglary at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop that occured on December 20. As part of the ongoing investigation into the burglary, Byron G. Gordon, age 40, of Kenai was arrested for Burglary 2nd Degree and Theft 2nd Degree. Also arrested was Kevin W. Brower, age 51, of Kenai. KPD Luitenent Ben Langham: “Byron Gordon entered and remained at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop interior building fenced in area and property while commiting the crime of theft in the 2nd degree. Kevin Brower arrived shortly after shortly after in his vehicle and collected Byron Gordon along with a stolen welder, power tools, and other stolen property.” Brower was arrested on January 22 in connection with a burglary at the Kenai Wash and Dry according to Langham he was released and then a warrant was served for his and Gordons arrest in connection with the burglary at Kenai Central High School. Brower told investigators that he returned days later on his own, and took another welder from the school. According to Langham, Brower was found in possession of the second stolen welder during a consent search by KPD. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp3VmJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

IMF chief Christine Lagarde on trial in France over tycoon case

first_imgInternational Monetary Fund (IMF) chief Christine Lagarde will face trial in France on Monday over a huge state payout case to a business tycoon during her tenure as the French finance minister.An Agence France-Presse (AFP) report said Lagarde allegedly mishandled a dispute with Bernard Tapie, the former owner of sportswear giant Adidas, during her term as finance minister, which resulted in payment of massive $427 million compensation to the business tycoon by the state. He has since been asked to repay the amount after a lengthy court battle.The IMF chief, however, denied the charges of negligence arguing that she had acted “in the state’s interest.” If found guilty, Lagarde could receive a one-year prison sentence along with $15,900 fine, the report said. She will be tried by the Court of Justice of the Republic, a tribunal that hears cases against ministers.Meanwhile, the case threatens the credibility of IMF, whose last three managing directors have faced trials. It also poses risk to the image of 60-year-old Lagarde, who has a stellar career progression from a former corporate lawyer to the finance minster of France to head the world’s most powerful funding agency — IMF.According to the report, Tapie, who owned Adidas between 1990-1993, had accused a state bank of defrauding him in his sale of the sportswear firm and was fighting a legal battle against the state. On becoming finance minister in 2007 under Nicolas Sarkozy, Lagarde had ordered that Tapie’s long-running battle with the state be resolved by arbitration.Investigators suspected that the arbitration process was rigged in favour of Tapie, who had supported Sarkozy in his 2007 presidential election campaign. Although Lagarde was not accused of being personally benefited from the decision, she had been criticised for failing to challenge the huge payout award in favour of Tapie.last_img read more

Global Markets Asian shares US stock futures dented by growth worries

first_imgAsian markets trade lower on 18 November (Reuters).Reuters file [Representational Image]Asian shares and U.S. stock futures slipped on Tuesday as pessimism about world growth drove investors away from risky assets, while sterling dithered as the latest plan for Brexit appeared to come and go with no progress.MSCI’s broadest index of Asia-Pacific shares outside Japan fell 0.5 per cent, drifting away from a recent seven-week top.Losses were led by Chinese shares, with the blue-chip index off 0.6 per cent. Hong Kong’s Hang Seng index was down 0.4 per cent and Australia’s main share index faltered 0.5 per cent.Japan’s Nikkei, which had opened firmer, was flat. US stock futures, which offer an indication of how Wall Street will open, were down about 0.5 per cent.US markets were closed on Monday for a holiday so trading was generally subdued overnight. However, equity prices in Europe and Latin America were hit after data showed a slowdown in growth in China, the world’s second-biggest economy.Adding to the air of caution and uncertainty, the International Monetary Fund trimmed its global growth forecasts and a survey showed increasing pessimism among business chiefs as trade tensions loomed.The gloomy IMF forecasts, released on the eve of the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, highlighted the challenges facing policymakers as they tackle an array of current or potential crises, from the US-China trade war to Brexit.”This is now the second IMF downgrade in a row,” ANZ analysts said in a note.”And while there have been some positive developments in recent weeks, risks remain skewed towards weaker growth, with a ‘no deal’ Brexit and a sharper-than-expected slowdown in China getting special mentions.””Between the ongoing US-China negotiations and the UK’s Brexit impasse, market sentiment will continue to be dominated by geopolitics in the near term,” ANZ added.In a sign of risk aversion, the Australian dollar, often used as a liquid proxy for China investments, nudged down to $0.7155, putting it on track for a third straight session of losses.Sterling traded cautiously around $1.2887 as British Prime Minister Theresa May refused to rule out a no-deal Brexit. There are few signs she can break a deadlock with parliament after her Brexit deal was rejected last week.May offered to tweak her defeated deal by seeking further concessions from the European Union on a backup plan to avoid a hard border in Ireland.”Any upside for sterling in the near term may be limited,” said Capital Economics analyst Liam Peach. “Uncertainty would continue during the extended negotiations and there is no guarantee that it would last for only a short period of time.”Analysts said investors were nervous about building positions in the pound, especially given the possibility of Britain leaving the EU without a deal.The dollar held at 109.62 against the Japanese yen while the euro was near the floor of its recent trading range at $1.1369. Against a basket of currencies, the dollar was flat at 96.324.In commodities, global growth worries pulled oil prices lower early on Tuesday with Brent down 14 cents at $62.60 and US crude futures off 7 cents at $53.73.last_img read more

Large section of persons arrested by ACC are govt officials

first_imgA large section of persons arrested in drives conducted by the Anti-Corruption Commission (ACC) over the last three years are government officials.These accused officials are serving in the departments of land administration, finance, health, education, electricity, gas, passports, banks, WASA, customs, roads and transport.The commission, after Iqbal Mahmud took office as its chair in 2016, detained 641 persons. Among them, 361 were government officials while 141 bank and insurance officials, 75 businessmen, and 31 politicians.Transparency International Bangladesh’s (TIB) 2018 household survey said around Tk 106.89 billion were exchanged in bribes.It also identified the law enforcement as the most corrupted institution in the country while the passport office, BRTA, judicial service and land services followed.According to the TI corruption index, corruption rose in 2018. In 2017, Bangladesh ranked 17th on the most corrupted countries’ list while it ranked 13th this year. ACC sources said, around 2.1 millions allegations were received through the ACC hotline in the last 20 months. Other than this, a total 17,000 written complaints were filed with the commission in 2018 while the number was 17,983 in 2017, and 13,000 in 2016, and 10,415 in 2015. More than half of the allegations were brought against government officials.”As the ACC deals with embezzlement of government funds, corruption and bribery, it is only natural to receive more allegations against government officials,” ACC commissioner (investigation) Mozammel Haque Khan said, adding, “Though bribery is more common among the government officials, corruption involving larger sums of money takes place more outside.”Following allegations received through hotline, ACC conducted drives at government hospitals, BRTA, Titas Gas, WASA, RAJUK, airlines, civil aviation, LGRD, REB. Since September 2017, 40 government officials were suspended by the ACC enforcement team and 45 were detained so far. Also, 7.1 million taka which exchanged hands illegally, had been returned.The commission also set up 50 traps to catch 50 government officials. Two chief engineers of the shipping department and Ansar commandant Ashikur Rahman were among persons detained in such sting operations.Corruption has increased as there is hardly any precedence of punishment for corruption, TIB executive director Iftekharuzzaman said. Over the last three years, top government officials, bankers, representatives were among the detainees. In 2016, a number of 388 persons were arrested while 182 and 57 were arrested respectively in 2017 and 2018. This year 14 persons have been arrested so far.The arrest spree declined somewhat following the public service 2018. According to the act, the concerned authority’s permission is required before arresting any government official even if they commit a criminal offence while in service.Prominent among those arrested over the last three years by ACC are chairman of the Farmers Bank audit committee Mahbubul Haque Chisty, chairman of AB Bank M Wahidul Haque, Citycell CEO Mehbub Chowdhury, former RAJUK chairman Iqbal Uddin Chowdhury, National University proctor HM Tayehid Jaman, Hallmark Group chairman Jesmin Islam, former coastguard director general Shafiq Ur Rahman, Partex Group director Shawkat Aziz Russel, former director of the passport directorate Munshi Muyeed Ikram, former Agrani Bank managing director Mizanur Rahman Khan and others.last_img read more