The toast, the butter and the technology: DMA 2013

first_imgI’m going to be speaking at the DMA Non Profit Conference next week. If you’re a Washington, DC-area native or are coming into town for the conference, come say hello.The DMA has asked me to share these details on the conference: It’s a great opportunity to gain insights into what other organizations like yours are doing in the fundraising world. Topics will include better ways to integrate your fundraising channels, build donor loyalty and improve your fundraising results. I’ll be speaking about what technology can and can’t do for fundraising. And toast and butter.Technology has enormous potential, but it’s all in how we use it. Technology is at its essence a delivery system. That means what’s being delivered will determine how much good comes of it. Adam Gopnik, a favorite writer of mine, compares technology to toast: “Our thoughts are bigger than the things that deliver them… Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn’t really about the quality of the bread or how it’s sliced or the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It’s about the butter.” He means the content of our ideas—the butter—is more valuable than the delivery vehicle —the toast of technology— that carries them. I’ll be talking about toast, butter and how to use technology in a way that drives more dollars.More details here.last_img read more

Online Fundraising Campaign in a Box

first_imgIn addition to your ongoing fundraising, advocacy and communication activities, there are times throughout the year when you need to lead your members through a series of actions. Whether it’s communication-list building, hitting a fundraising target to support a new program or structure, or gathering support for a community initiative (to name a few possibilities), you’ll get the most bang for your buck by conducting a targeted fundraising campaign. We’ve put together a step by step guide to the outreach,tracking, follow-up and other activities necessary to reach your goals. Download the free guide: Fundraising Campaign in a Boxlast_img

Great neighbors, but no casseroles.

first_imgMy peers and I are the Tweens of adulthood. We are old enough to remember the milkman delivering to the doorstep, and young enough to appreciate the poetry of rap music—at least some of it. We are the children of the baby boom, and the parents of Millennials.Growing up, we were defined by our neighborhoods. Our parents chose neighborhoods based on what today we call affinity groups: ethnicity, education, class, age of kids. Our social network was the neighborhood. Accomplishments were celebrated with neighbors, and challenges were tackled with neighbors, often accompanied by a casserole. Charity began at home.Networked NeighborhoodsBetween the 70s and today, neighborhoods ceased to be the centrifugal center of social networks. Yet the desire for connection remains. We 40- and 50-somethings watch our kids form “neighborhoods” on their Social Networks. Likes, status updates, and feedback have replaced the celebratory visit, but they reinforce the importance of celebration.And importantly, a neighbor in need can draw support from a city of virtual neighborhoods. In the Dragonfly Effect, Jennifer Aaker and Andy Smith tell an illustrative story: Sameer and Vinay, both afflicted with late-stage leukemia, used their networks to register 24,611 South Asian bone marrow donors in 11 weeks. There was an authentic need, clearly communicated, and “neighbors” around the country responded.Networks will increasingly power nonprofits.I recently re-read the Networked Nonprofit, by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine. It brings the networked nonprofit to life in this reflection.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls — lots of conversations — to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists.”Strong networks also support cultivation of major donors and passionate evangelists who provide the backbone for nonprofits as they grow. And through social networks, charities and community organizations can become ’causes’, moving digital citizens to fuel their missions with energy, engagement and – yes – money.Millennials, in particular, say the charities they support are one way they express themselves, and 87% of Millennials in a 2011 survey said “my priority is to look after my family and community; charity begins at home.” And the home that Millennials are most closely tied to is the one they have chosen, in their networked neighborhood.If causes can become authentic institutions of these networked neighborhoods, they will find a new group of supporters who will celebrate their successes and help them tackle their challenges…without the casseroles.Follow Jamie on LinkedIn to get more insights on giving and mobilizing your community.Photo credit: David K., plasticrevolver on Flickrlast_img read more

What’s the state of your online giving?

first_imgIn our latest Network for Good video clip, I share some key points about the state of online giving. Online donations continue to grow at a faster clip than overall giving as more of our communication and actions go online. As digital natives come into their own and as we see peer fundraising, mobile giving, and events like giving days become nonprofit staples, we expect online giving rates to climb more quickly. To make the most of digitally-minded donors, your online fundraising strategy needs to adhere to these core tenets:Online giving can’t be siloed. Your online fundraising efforts should be tied to your overall fundraising strategy, and integrated with your offline marketing outreach. Make sure your website, email, and social media messages match your direct mail appeals. Your donors’ conversation with you will span more than one channel. Many offline donors will still go online to learn more about you and read about the impact a gift could have. Online giving must be easy. The beauty of technology is that it can make things easier, faster, and more fun. Your donation experience should work to remove any barriers that might prevent someone from giving. Remember: the fewer steps and clicks it takes someone to complete a donation, the more likely they are to give.Online giving should encourage more gifts. In addition to making it easy to give, your donation experience should inspire donors to give more. By offering a compelling story, suggested donation amounts, and recurring giving options, you can increase your overall fundraising totals as well as your average online gift. Need to boost your fundraising results? These resources will help you think through your online strategy:Understand online fundraising patterns by reviewing the Digital Giving Index.Check to see how your online donation experience stacks up with the Donation Page Grader.Learn how to attract more donors with your website, through email, and via mobile and social in our Online Fundraising Survival Guide.Sign up for a free demo of Network for Good’s fundraising software. Our team will give you a full tour and answer your questions about which tools are right for your campaigns.How are you integrating online fundraising at your organization? Chime in below to share your tips and challenges with your fellow readers.last_img read more

Nonprofit Spotlight: Firecracker Foundation

first_imgNetwork for Good works with so many amazing nonprofits and we want to introduce you to them and the great work they are doing! Because May is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I want you to meet one of my favorite customers who is doing amazing work helping child sexual abuse survivors heal their whole being.Meet Firecracker Foundation The Firecracker Foundation challenges their supporters to build a blaze, to be a part of the network that keeps and builds the lively sparks in child survivors. From the adult survivors who serve as mentors to the therapists and yoga instructors who offer their time and expertise, Firecracker truly has built a community of healing around the children survivors they serve. That community isn’t just by happenstance; they’ve consciously made recurring giving the heart of their fundraising strategy as a way to ensure the continued success of their communal work. On a larger scale, however, The Firecracker Foundation is about community. Tashmica Torok, the founder of Firecracker, has built her organization around the historical idea of community members being charged with keeping the communal fire burning. From their mission to their fundraising strategy, this ethos of the many coming together for a common goal is extremely evident. We are honored to serve the Firecracker Foundation as their online donation software provider! You guys are amazing! Using Facebook to rally attendance at events is a great way to meet supporters where they already are: Facebook. During their year-end campaign Firecracker Foundation’s Instagram feed kept supporters updated on how close they were to hitting their goal. http://t.co/FKbNzanWBF #ItsTimeToAct #SAAM2015 #LetsEndViolence #SexualAssaultAwarenessMonth— The Firecracker Fdn (@FirecrackerFdn) April 7, 2015 Due to the sensitive nature of their work, it might not be safe to display the photos of those they serve. However, they embrace that challenge and still share images that show the impact of donors’ gifts, without showing clients’ faces. Social media gives organizations the unique opportunity of giving supporters an inside peek into all the work you do. In addition to their work with sexual abuse survivors, Firecracker Foundation also trains advocates. Their Model Stellar Social Media Don’t worry about constantly generating original content, share content that will resonate with your supporters and promote your mission. On a day-to-day basis, The Firecracker Foundation works with survivors of childhood sexual trauma through long-term strategies of therapy, arts enrichment, and yoga practice. Their work is focused on healing the whole individual. Firecracker Foundation takes their emphasis of community involvement and engagement beyond the clients they serve and the advocates they train. They also take that energy to social media. Check out these posts from their social channels: As one of our “Spotlight” nonprofits, we encourage you to take a look at the great work they’re doing and spread the love by following them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.last_img read more

Free Maternity Services in Kenya: Do They Include Respectful Maternity Care?

first_imgPosted on December 13, 2013November 7, 2016By: Nora Miller, Research Assistant, Respectful Maternity Care program, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Unlike many of its neighboring countries, where progress has been made toward the MDG 5 target of increasing the proportion of births with a skilled birth attendant (SBA), Kenya has struggled. In fact, the country experienced a reduction in the percent of births attended by SBAs: from 50% in 1989 to 44% in 2010. This has contributed to an excessively high maternal mortality ratio of 488 deaths per 100,000 live births, leaving it off track  to meet MDG 5 by the  2015 deadline.In an effort to address this issue, the newly elected Jubilee Government included the promise of free maternity services at public facilities in its 2013 campaign and officially abolished user fees in June of this year.  While there has been much celebration of the free maternity services policy and the historic gains made for women’s rights in general, many members of civil society and the public at large have expressed skepticism about the impact this will have on reducing maternal mortality, and anecdotal evidence suggests mothers have avoided the free maternity services fearing that quality of care will decrease.Even though the new policy removes an important financial burden, it does not fully address the numerous deterrents to receiving care that women must overcome in order to access services. In addition to known geographic, financial and cultural barriers, research conducted by the Kenyan Federation of Women Lawyers, Family Care International and the Population Council has shown that disrespectful and abusive care from providers serves as a major deterrent to the decision to deliver in health facilities in Kenya. These studies show that many women choose to deliver at home because they fear the inhumane treatment they may experience if they go to the hospital. Under the new policy, respectful maternity care remains a concern, as women who access the free services may risk be subjected to humiliating or degrading treatment by health care providers and hospital staff.The new policy does not  account for measures necessary to accommodate the expected increase in demand: additional investments are needed to increase  the number of facilities or expand existing facilities’ capacity; ensure availability of supplies and equipment; and train health workers to provide respectful maternity care. Additionally, the policy does little to address the persistent shortage in human resources for health—an issue that has recently been compounded by a health worker strike.In short, removing user fees plays a key role in reducing financial barriers, but does not ensure that women will make the decision to deliver in health facilities, with assistance from SBAs, nor  guarantee that the care they receive will be delivered with respect.Kenya’s 2010 Constitution provides for human dignity and the right to life. In providing free maternity services, the Jubilee Government has taken laudable steps towards protecting women’s right to health and in ensuring that financial barriers will not prevent women from accessing care in facilities. However, much more remains to be done to guarantee the Constitution’s claim of the right to human dignity, especially with regard to women’s  experience of childbirth in health facilities.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The Lancet’s Editor Richard Horton Provides Commentary on Recent MMR Estimates

first_imgPosted on May 28, 2014November 4, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)If you have been following the news and our MMR Estimates Blog Series, you know that the WHO and IHME recently released new global estimates for maternal mortality. These estimates have strong implications for global maternal health goals as they will be used as baselines for Post-2015 targets.Dr. Richard Horton, Editor-in-Chief at The Lancet, recently addressed a common concern with these estimates—the estimates differ greatly at a regional and country level. Dr. Horton points out, “These differences are not at all obvious when one examines the headline numbers from each source. IHME’s global estimate for maternal deaths is 292,982. The equivalent UN figure is 289,000. But at the regional level, big differences begin to appear.” In fact, 15 of the 75 countries with the highest burden of maternal mortality have estimates that differ by 1,041 to 21,792 maternal deaths. The discrepancy of 21,792 deaths falls on India—the country with the highest number of maternal deaths in the world.For a country that needs to strategize well to address this high burden of disease, India is faced with a discrepancy that could affect how they respond. Dr. Horton says, “[If] you were India’s new Prime-Minister-elect, Narendra Modi, you might just alter the urgency with which you acted to reduce maternal mortality if you believed the UN figure, which records a remarkable 21,792 fewer maternal deaths than the independently calculated estimate from a competing large international collaboration. It would not be unreasonable if other Presidents and Prime Ministers, let alone Ministers of Health, were confused by these often strikingly divergent results.” The discrepancies not only affect the important decisions of country officials, but also affect the credibility of the estimates themselves.So what can be done to address these discrepancies? Dr. Horton suggests reviewing the methods and models used to generate these estimates. “[The] Gates Foundation funded Independent Advisory Committee for the Global Burden of Disease… meets next month in Seattle. One of its remits is to ‘engage in dialogue with other efforts on global health estimates.’ A further goal is to review strengths and weaknesses of the GBD’s methods. But this second objective will solve only half of the problem. Someone also needs to assess the strengths and weaknesses of the UN’s methods. [The Independent Advisory Committee for the Global Burden of Disease] could consider conducting a careful comparison of methods used by both the UN and IHME.”The most important conclusion of this discussion is that country leaders need accurate data to effectively mitigate maternal mortality. As the common management adage teaches us, “You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” Hopefully with increased collaboration we can bridge the gap between UN and IHME estimates for maternal mortality.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Women, Girls and Universal Health Coverage: Who Is Accountable?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 14, 2015December 7, 2016By: Belkis Giorgis, Global Technical Lead for Gender, Management Sciences for Health (MSH); Fabio Castaño, Global Technical Lead for Family Planning and Reproductive Health, Management Sciences for Health (MSH)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of the Woman-Centered Universal Health Coverage Series, hosted by the Maternal Health Task Force and USAID|TRAction, which discusses the importance of utilizing a woman-centered agenda to operationalize universal health coverage.Who is accountable for the young woman dying during childbirth in a hospital in Lusaka, Zambia? For the woman in a health center in Bugiri in Uganda? For the girl child in a rural home in Uttar Pradesh, India? In a shanty town in Tegucigalpa, Honduras? Who is accountable for the women and adolescent girls in a thousand places everywhere?The burden of ensuring safe delivery does not fall solely on the shoulders of women and girls, but falls on all of us. Whether we are policymakers, service providers, development workers, husbands, fathers or mothers-in-law, we can all make a difference. It is our responsibility to do so.  As a society, we owe it to women to ensure they have a safe delivery and access to family planning information and services.Complications from pregnancy and childbirth are the leading cause of death among women and female adolescents in their reproductive years in low- and middle-income countries. Both family and cultural structures, as well as the health system, fail many women and girls, especially those living in rural and hard-to-reach regions. This is evidenced by the father who married off his daughter when she was a child, the husband who would not let his wife go to a health facility and a lack of affordable, accessible, quality facility-based care. These factors—in addition to ill-equipped clinics, poorly trained health workers and cultural perceptions that childbirth does not require skilled care—contribute to the high maternal mortality rates in developing countries.We have the responsibility to hold policymakers accountable for reforming health systems in pursuit of universal health coverage (UHC), which will transform populations’ health and save women’s and children’s lives. UHC shifts the burden of health costs from women to society and in a small way, shows our gratitude to women for giving life. UHC recognizes that women should not be neglected when they give birth and that women should not die while giving life. The responsibility of caring for women during delivery is a societal debt paid partly by eliminating the obstacles to safe, skilled and respectful care during childbirth.Because women often bear the greatest share of the economic costs associated with their families’ health, UHC can also have a proportionally greater effect on women by dramatically reducing their out-of-pocket costs and offering financial protection.Low-income countries must start with modest but high-impact services. A core package of services for reproductive, maternal and child health driven by community health workers provides the logical cornerstone of UHC plans.Family planning should be non-negotiable and included in even the most frugal UHC plans. Everyone has the right to access family planning services, which includes the ability to choose when and how to utilize a variety of options. Fulfilling the unmet need for family planning alone would prevent 150,000 maternal deaths and 640,000 newborn deaths globally each year.Through UHC, health systems can be strengthened to ensure that frontline health workers are in the right place at the right time to deliver the right services effectively.Who is accountable? We are. UHC that delivers for women and girls in the post-2015 era requires us all to be accountable. We must embrace this responsibility to accompany, support and empower women and adolescent girls on this journey fraught with both barriers and possibilities.Share this:last_img read more

How to Train Providers Where Maternal Mortality is Highest

first_imgPosted on February 13, 2015October 28, 2016By: Atziri Ramírez Negrin, Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and ResearchClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In Mexico, maternal mortality continues to be a public health problem. Throughout the country, the burden of maternal mortality varies greatly between different locations. The three states with the highest maternal mortality ratio are Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas. The main causes of maternal mortality continue to be hypertensive pregnancy disorders and postpartum haemorrhage.Medical interns practice management of postpartum hemorrhageIn order to help meet the needs of these underserved and high-burdened states, newly graduated medical students are required to oversee a low-income community for an internship year after completing medical school. However, this means that the most inexperienced clinicians are caring for the most vulnerable with restricted access to other medical assistance.Based on these worrisome facts, the director of community service at the National University and I decided to organize a three-day course covering pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) for the soon-to-be doctors of the most affected areas in Mexico. We hosted 160 students, which was a big challenge, but an encouraging one.The first day a very important question was posed to the medical students: “How many of you have seen a woman die from postpartum haemorrhage?” The answer was shocking: half of the medical students had witnessed a maternal death caused by PPH during their short practice.The students were trained using both e-learning modules and hands-on experience. The PPH and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia e-learning modules were created by the Oxford Maternal and Perinatal Health Institute and Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER). The three hands-on PPH simulations were key to solidifying knowledge presented in the e-learning modules.At the first station, students practiced risk factor assessments and bleeding measurement. A series of clinical cases were posed where risk factors were reviewed. Also, students were handed gauzes and compresses soaked in red liquid to practice assessing what different quantities of blood looked like.At the second station, students learned how to build a low cost balloon for uterine tamponade with condoms and Foley catheters. They then practiced inserting the balloon in a pelvis model to treat simulated PPH.At the last station, participants were faced with a delivery patient model where they assisted a delivery, practiced shoulder dystocia maneuvers, implemented the active management of the third stage of labour and followed a PPH protocol, which included pharmacological strategies.Students were asked if they considered the training course interesting and useful and the answer was an overwhelming, yes! Ninety six percent considered it very useful and interesting. One of the most curious comments during the feedback was that although students considered the training adequate for their skill level, 50% thought it should have been given much earlier, since the skills were needed for many cases during medical school.Overall the course participants and staff had a great time. Hopefully this will become a routine course every year and perhaps available to all medical school students before they finish their career!Any comments or suggestions, please feel free to e-mail the author at:atziriok@yahoo.comShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

4 Lessons from the Trenches to Prepare for Giving Season

first_imgHere at Network for Good, we’re continuously innovating our platform. The best way we do this is by immersing ourselves in the lives of our nonprofit users to understand the everyday problems they are trying to solve.Last week, during a quarterly business review meeting in Baltimore, our team was challenged to meet with local nonprofits to help them drive awareness and increase funds. Below are the cliff notes from the day:The ChallengeWe arrived in Baltimore at 9AM on Wednesday, July 19. We broke into five teams and were given a task: find a nonprofit and help them fundraise leveraging the “Jobs to be Done” philosophy around functional, social, and emotional drivers. The team that raises the most, wins.The results: $7,360. In a single day.That’s $7,360 that went to five local nonprofits: Wide Angle Youth Media, Holistic Life Foundation, Playworks Maryland, Women’s Housing Coalition, and University of Maryland Baltimore.As we got to know these five nonprofits and the people who lead them, four lessons stood out. We thought we would share them in a new Blog Series to help you prepare for giving season.Here’s what we learned:1. Giving is an emotional act.We quickly learned the real-life value of emotionally driven appeals. Most of the donations we collected were from people who had an emotional connection to us. We had greater luck raising funds from text messages to our personal network than asking for donation on the streets – although we did both! This builds the case for the power behind peer-to-peer fundraising.2. Not all nonprofits are created equal, but they all face time and capacity challenges.Each nonprofit we helped had their own set of challenges to overcome. Some had more limited resources than others. Some had a lot of pressure on them to fundraise in order to serve their clients, while others needed more strategic help.  But what they all had in common was time and capacity challenges and the need for systems that would solve this problem.3. All of them wonder, “Are we doing enough?”All of the nonprofits we worked with that day shared concerns about their funding and sustainability. They wondered if they were doing enough to diversity their funding strategy. Creating a sustainable individual giving program and having the right mix of individual giving and additional funding sources are continual concerns.4. There’s nothing like the power of a team.When we set out to raise as much as we could in just one day, we quickly learned that we were all motivated to win the challenge because we all knew what we were working towards. We saw this at the nonprofits too, and believe those with a strong strategy were able to rally their troops and others around their cause more easily.Check back next week as we dive into the first lesson, on how you can leverage the emotional connection when developing your appeals this giving season.last_img read more

Use Our New Organizations Search!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 14, 2015August 8, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)We are excited to present a new feature on the MHTF website: the organizations search.We have created a database of maternal health organizations to help foster connections and build partnerships between groups working on similar issues. There are many diverse organizations around the world working on maternal health, and this new tool will help you connect with them!The organizations database grew out of the maternal health mapping project, part of phase 1 of the MHTF. As more and more organizations added themselves to the map, it became difficult to find anyone! The new search-based interface enables easy access to the information.We want to hear from you! Test out the new organizations search feature and let us know what you think. If your organization is not included in the search, but you would like it to be, please fill out the information form. We would be happy to add you!Share this:last_img read more

WHO Misoprostol Approval Means Lifesaving Treatment for Women in Low-resource Settings

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2015June 12, 2017By: Lindsay Grenier, Maternal Health Technical Advisor, MCSP ; Susan Moffson, MCSP Senior Program OfficerClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post has been slightly edited from it’s original posting on the blog of the Maternal and Child Survival Program.A young woman arrived at a health clinic in Sierra Leone with heavy bleeding. She was suffering from postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)—or excessive bleeding after birth—the most common cause of death for women after delivery.The midwife at the clinic acted quickly, administering oxytocin, a uterotonic that helps the uterus contract to stop the bleeding. However, the facility was lacking the refrigeration needed to properly store the drug, which was also two years out of date. As a result, the oxytocin had no effect, and the woman died two hours later.Mother and newborn in Allahabad, India. (Kate Holt/MCHIP)Tragically, poor and marginalized populations suffering from a disproportionate burden of disease often have the least access to high-quality health services. This is especially true of women during childbirth, who often deliver at home instead of health facilities. Those women who do make it to a facility may find them ill-equipped, lacking skilled personnel and essential medicines. Or, as in the case of the young woman from Sierra Leone, the medicines may be expired and improperly stored, thereby greatly diminishing their effectiveness.Alarmingly, all of these women will be at risk of dying from PPH without access to uterotonics. And while oxytocin is the gold standard for preventing and treating PPH, it is not always available or kept sufficiently cool. It must also be given through injection by a skilled birth attendant, such as a doctor or nurse.Thankfully, there is a second-line uterotonic drug that can be used to prevent and treat PPH when oxytocin is not available: misoprostol. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently added misoprostol — which does not require refrigeration and can be taken as a pill — to the Essential Medicines List for treatment of PPH in every country. This action expands the range of options to treat PPH, empowering health care workers with one more tool in their arsenal to fight bleeding after birth.As professionals who work every day around the world to ensure our interventions reach the most vulnerable populations, and understand the endorsement of misoprostol means more equitable access to and appropriate use of uteronics for countless women across the developing world.The WHO announcement opens an exciting new chapter in global health. While much work remains before every facility can guarantee a stable stock of viable oxytocin, the endorsement of misoprostol for the treatment of PPH will increase the availability of lifesaving care for some of the world’s most vulnerable women.As part of our own comprehensive PPH strategy, MCSP continues to strengthen essential health system functions, with the goal of overcoming local system barriers to provision of high-quality care, effective referral systems, and trained providers.Share this:last_img read more

Invest in Young People to End Child Marriage, Maternal Mortality, and to Achieve the Development Goals

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on October 14, 2015October 13, 2016By: Kenny Simbaya, White Ribbon Alliance Citizen ReporterClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)On September 25, 2015 at the United Nations headquarters in New York City, 193 Member States of the UN unanimously adopted the post-2015 development goals christened Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). They are 17 in total with 169 targets. They were received with both optimism and skepticism.The SDGs are an opportunity to end extreme poverty, hunger, protect the planet and end preventable maternal, newborn and child deaths. To achieve these goals, we need accountability and citizen engagement.As an advocate for maternal and newborn health issues, I would like to share some thoughts on Sustainable Development Goal 3, which is about ensuring healthy lives and promoting well-being for all at all ages. The health and well-being of mothers is central to this goal, and if we collectively work to achieve it, the new generation of women will enjoy one of their most respected responsibilities – that of bringing a new life.However, ending maternal and newborn death will remain a pipe dream unless we invest in young people with a special focus on girls. Ensuring girls enjoy their human rights just like boys do, will mean that we work hard to end child marriage.Statistics from UNFPA show that 70,000 adolescents die annually from causes related to pregnancy and child birth: pregnancy-related complications, together with HIV, are the leading causes of death among girls 15 to 19 years old. In fact, the risk of maternal death for mothers younger than 18 in low- and middle-income countries is double that of older females. During this year’s UNGA, a young mother of two and White Ribbon Alliance Citizen Reporter from West Bengal, India, Santana Murmu (now 18), shared her own experience of being married at 14. She now advocates for the improvement of maternal health and campaigns to end early marriage everywhere.“The world must stand together to condemn child marriage as it has adverse impact to the development and health of both the child-bride and that of her would-be newborn,” shared Murmu.To achieve this objective, we must engage young people. Children that are now 15 years old were newborns when the Millennium Development Goals were launched in 2000. When the SDGs come to an end, these children will be 30 years old. The SDGs are a young people’s agenda – they will be the ones to implement it.Photo: “Indien” © 2008 M M, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

Saving Lives During Health Worker Strikes: Lessons From Kenya

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 21, 2017November 21, 2017By: Nicole Sijenyi Fulton, Team Leader, Options Consultancy Services Ltd.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As project managers and organizational leaders, many of us oversee programs that strengthen the public sector to deliver high quality maternal and newborn health (MNH) services. Our efforts depend heavily on the functionality of the health workforce in the countries where we work.But what happens when public sector health workers are on strike? Health facilities in low-income countries often close down completely during industrial action, disrupting what can be the only health system accessible to poor individuals. This can have especially severe consequences for pregnant women and their newborns. When the public health workforce is not operating, many women and their families must choose between having a risky home delivery with an unskilled provider, going to an unaffordable private hospital or crossing the border into a neighboring territory.Public sector health workers go on strike for many reasons, usually as a last resort. In resource-poor settings, major staffing shortages are widespread, making individual workloads unsustainable. Supervision is often poor with limited access to training and development. Robust management systems are rarely in place, and health workers miss opportunities for career progression and salary adjustments over many years. Under these circumstances, doctors, nurses and other health professionals pursue collective bargaining not only for themselves, but in the long-term interests of the communities they serve.Over the past year, Kenya’s public health system has faced numerous strikes of multiple cadres, including nurses and clinical officers, sometimes for several months at a time. The latest national nurses’ strike lasted from June to October 2017. During these extended periods, most public dispensaries and health centers close their doors. Some hospitals remain open on a limited basis, but even when they do, service uptake drops dramatically and mortality rises. Recent media coverage in Kenya has indicated a potential doubling of maternal deaths during the recent nurses’ strike.While political action is underway, what can health program managers do to prevent maternal and newborn deaths? MNH programs in Bungoma, Kenya have revealed effective strategies for safeguarding the health of pregnant women and newborns under challenging circumstances.Supporting the faith-based sectorFor most poor families, the faith-based sector is the only option for facility delivery when the public sector closes because other private sector facilities tend to be too expensive. This trend is exemplified by shifts in where cesarean sections take place during and after strike periods in Bungoma, Kenya:Source: Kenya District Health Information System (DHIS2)This influx of patients creates an unmanageable workload for health workers and affects the quality of care they are able to provide.Programs can provide targeted support to health facilities in the faith-based sector in several areas:Procurement of essential drugs, supplies and equipment to ensure that over-crowded facilities can maintain high quality services during surges in patient volume.Mentorship programs for emergency obstetric and newborn care can be implemented so that nurses from public facilities on strike can practice their skills while assisting with staffing needs.Financial support to help offset higher operating costs.Program adaptationWhen health workers go on strike, health programs must adapt in the following ways:Fail fast. Learn from failure and move on quickly. Regular reviews of routine data will quickly point to a health system that is not working during a health worker strike and can offer clues for adjustment.Support decentralized decision-making. The staff who are closest to the ground are the ones who see the problems and the solutions most clearly—but they are often too far away from decision-making authority to change a programming approach without extensive consultation. Breaking down these barriers speeds up the change process.Be ready. After one strike ends, another one might be on the horizon. With each cycle, learn and adapt for the future.In the long term, health system reforms are needed to support the health workforce and equip it with sufficient resources to provide high quality care. In the meantime, program managers can play a critical role in ensuring quality MNH services are available during health worker strikes. Women are counting on us to roll up our sleeves, think creatively and work together to keep essential services available.—Read other posts from the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s Global Maternal Health Workforce blog series.Browse maternal health organizations working in Kenya.Interested in writing for the MHTF blog? Check out our guest post guidelines.Share this:last_img read more

Seized Stena Impero Leaves Iran Owner Confirms

first_imgzoomImage Courtesy: Stena Bulk The detained tanker Stena Impero has finally been released and is sailing to Dubai, according to the ship’s owner Stena Bulk.“Stena Bulk and Northern Marine Management confirm the Stena Impero and its crew have been released,” Erik Hanell, President and CEO of Stena Bulk, said.“The vessel has left the port of Bandar Abbas and is transiting to Dubai for the crew to disembark and receive medical checks and de-briefing.”Hanell further noted that the families of crew members have been informed and the company is making arrangements for the repatriation of the sixteen seafarers “at the earliest possible opportunity.”Iran’s Ports & Maritime Organization said that, although the ship ban was lifted, the process of investigating violations and announcing the final results of the legal proceeds is ongoing.The 46,575 cbm ship was detained near the Strait of Hormuz for alleged marine violations on July 19, only weeks after the Royal Marines and Gibraltar authorities seized the Iranian tanker Adrian Darya 1, previously named Grace 1, due to suspicions of violating EU sanctions on Syria.Iran later released seven of the 23 Stena Impero crew members as the ship’s owner, Stena Bulk, requested the removal of non-essential personnel.last_img read more

A year after bringing us Moonlight TIFFs Platform has a few more

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment When TIFF created its Platform program of lovingly curated and modestly competitive films two summers ago, it did so without serious consideration of the Oscars.The whole point of the exercise was almost anti-Oscar. The program is a showcase for quality international cinema, featuring a dozen great films that might otherwise escape attention during the awards-season frenzy.But last year’s Platform crop yielded Barry Jenkins’ lyrical coming-of-ager Moonlight, which scored eight Oscar nominations and three wins, Best Picture among them. Facebook Advertisement Advertisement The section also had Pablo Larrain’s Camelot tragedy Jackie, which received three Oscar nominations, including a Best Actress nom for Natalie Portman. And both films won many other industry prizes and kudos.So where does Platform go after hitting the heights and striking gold? I put the question to Cameron Bailey, TIFF’s artistic director, as the festival this week announced the 12 films for the program’s third edition, running during the 42nd annual Toronto International Film Festival (Sept. 7-17). Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With:last_img read more

Ohio State field hockey set for Big Ten tournament quarterfinal vs Northwestern

OSU sophomore forward Maddy Humphrey (23) during a game against California on Oct. 25 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 6-3. Credit: Robert Scarpinito | Copy ChiefOhio State field hockey is set to face fourth-seeded and No. 17 Northwestern in the opening game of the Big Ten Tournament, where the winner will move on to compete against top-seeded Maryland or eighth-seeded Michigan State.Northwestern (12-7, 4-4) and OSU last met less than a month ago when they squared off at Buckeye Varsity Field in a game in which the Wildcats scored once in each half. Those two goals were enough to defeat OSU in shutout fashion, 2-0. OSU hopes to increase offensive pressure this time around, coach Anne Wilkinson said.“We can’t give up the amount of shots we’ve given up in the past,” Wilkinson said. “We haven’t generated enough attacks and been able to sustain them so we need to take more shots and challenge more of these goalkeepers.”Sophomore forward Morgan Kile said one of the main components going into the tournament is putting all of the pieces together one last time. “I think the key thing for our team going into the tournament is to put all the skills and things we’ve worked on throughout the season together,” Kile said. “We need to really show Northwestern what we can do out there.”The Buckeyes will enter the tournament with three players being awarded All-Big Ten honors. Senior co-captains Peanut Johnson and Emma Royce, along with sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey, were bestowed the awards after their efforts this season. Johnson, Humphrey, Royce and Kile have all registered double-digit points, with Johnson and Humphrey being the fourth-highest scoring duo in the Big Ten this year with 53 total points. This year will be the Buckeyes’ 20th all-time appearance in the Big Ten tournament. Thrice they have taken home the Big Ten title. In 2001 and 2010, OSU was a co-champion, while it captured the outright crown in 2006. The last time OSU and Northwestern squared off against each other in the tournament was in 2013. In that game, Johnson registered a goal and an assist, pushing the Buckeyes to a 3-2 victory against the then-No. 13 Wildcats.In order to post another win this time around, Wilkinson said teamwork will be critical.“The most important thing is we have to play together,” Wilkinson said. “Sometimes they take too much on themselves and put too much weight on their individual ability. We just need to rely on each other and play as a team, and the results will take care of themselves. We have to work hard, which they have.”OSU and Northwestern are set face off at 10 a.m. on Thursday in Bloomington, Indiana. Defensive gainsOSU has given up 18 fewer goals this year — 56 last season compared to 38 in 2015 — as well as allowing 21 fewer shots (280 in 2014, 259 in 2015) and 10 fewer penalty corners (124 in 2014, 114 in 2015). Sophomore goalie Liz Tamburro finished the season with 124 total saves. She ranks second in the conference with 6.88 saves per game.Game results when OSU…Scores first: 7-0Leads at the half: 5-0Trails at the half: 2-9Is tied at the half: 2-0Outshoots its opponent: 4-3Is outshot: 5-6Is in a one-goal game: 4-2Is in a two-goal game: 5-7Heads to overtime: 1-1 read more

Ohio State field hockey loses 2nd straight game

Sophomore forward Brooke Hiltz (6) marks an opposing player during a game against Penn State on Sept. 28 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU lost, 4-3.Credit: Grant Miller / Copy chiefBehind two goals from senior forward Jenna Chrismer, Penn State field hockey outlasted Ohio State, 4-3, Sunday afternoon at Buckeye Varsity Field.OSU senior co-captain and midfielder Kaitlyn Wagner made the game interesting late when she converted on a penalty stroke with 7:50 left to play in regulation to cut Penn State’s lead to one.The Buckeyes (3-6, 0-2) couldn’t climb the ladder, however, and were unable to break through in the game’s final minutes.Freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey created the penalty stroke after she dribbled down the field and was tackled inside the scoring circle. She subsequently had to leave the game due to a right leg injury, but returned with less than four minutes to play.OSU had one final gasp when junior back and co-captain Emma Royce fired on goal off a penalty corner with a little more than five minutes left, but redshirt-senior goalie Kylie Licata made a diving stop to preserve the game for Penn State (8-2, 2-1).Despite the valiant effort toward the finish, OSU coach Anne Wilkinson said Sunday the game was lost in the opening minutes against the two-time defending Big Ten champions.“We could have (done) a lot better job in the first 15-20 minutes of setting the tone and playing strong defense,” Wilkinson said. “We need to be able to take charge in the (defending) circle.”Royce said the team’s mindset must change in order to dictate the pace from the start of each game.“I think the best way we can stay focused for the first 15 (minutes) is instead of ball watching, focusing on our tempo and keeping possession of the ball,” she said. “The reason why we get turned over in our back third in the early 15 is because we give away the ball too easily. So it’s more attention to detail, which I think is the key.”It took Penn State just 2:41 to get on the board when Chrismer scored off an assist from senior forward Taylor Herold from three yards out.Less than eight minutes later, with the score 2-1, Chrismer connected again off a pass from sophomore midfielder Carly Celkos.“I think we need to mentally prepare beforehand, have good warm-ups,” OSU junior forward Peanut Johnson said. “It starts there because I think it’s taking us a little bit of time to be on our game, which can’t happen.”In the second half, OSU struggled with Penn State’s size and the pressure they put on the ball. The Buckeyes found it hard to get into scoring position, recording five shots in the second period.Penn State had a 4-2 advantage in penalty corners in the second half. Penn State sophomore back Emilee Ehret converted off one a little more than 10 minutes into the frame with assists from Herold and senior forward Laura Gebhart. And Ehret’s goal proved to be the difference maker in the end.Herold’s three assists Sunday put her one point away from 100 in her Penn State career.The Buckeyes are set to go on the road for three consecutive games to start October against Maryland, Virginia and Rutgers. OSU is set to face Maryland on Friday in College Park, Md., at 3:30 p.m. read more

Two Arrested In Connection With Burglary At Kenai Central High School

first_imgLangham: “The total value of the stolen property by Brower and Gordon was greater than $750 and less than $25,000.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Police Department have arrested two individuals in connection with a break in and burglary at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop that occured on December 20. As part of the ongoing investigation into the burglary, Byron G. Gordon, age 40, of Kenai was arrested for Burglary 2nd Degree and Theft 2nd Degree. Also arrested was Kevin W. Brower, age 51, of Kenai. KPD Luitenent Ben Langham: “Byron Gordon entered and remained at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop interior building fenced in area and property while commiting the crime of theft in the 2nd degree. Kevin Brower arrived shortly after shortly after in his vehicle and collected Byron Gordon along with a stolen welder, power tools, and other stolen property.” Brower was arrested on January 22 in connection with a burglary at the Kenai Wash and Dry according to Langham he was released and then a warrant was served for his and Gordons arrest in connection with the burglary at Kenai Central High School. Brower told investigators that he returned days later on his own, and took another welder from the school. According to Langham, Brower was found in possession of the second stolen welder during a consent search by KPD. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp3VmJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Man Found Deceased In Trailer On Hope Highway

first_imgAccording to Megan Peters, Spokeswoman with AST, no foul play is suspected. AST responded and located the owner of the truck, Christopher J. Nash, age 58 of Anchorage, deceased in the trailer. Nash was transported to the State Medical Examiner for autopsy. The next of kin has been notified.center_img Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Alaska State Troopers, Soldotna Dispatch, received a  request for a welfare check on the occupant of a truck and trailer near mile 2.0 of the Hope Highway, on March 13.last_img