The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Nonprofit Branding Done Right Raises More Money

first_imgWhen it comes to updating nonprofit branding, there can seem be more questions than answers. Questions like:Will rebranding increase donations?Will rebranding make it easier for us to convey our organization’s impact and value?Is now the time for us to rebrand?We finally get answers to these million-dollar questions in The Rebrand Effect: How Significant Communications Changes Help Nonprofits Raise More Money (free download here).This eBook from nonprofit communications agency Big Duck is based on the results of a national survey of 350 nonprofit organizations that rebranded within the last 10 years.For the study, Big Duck defines a comprehensive rebrand as developing or changing four or more of these elements:Brand strategyOrganizational nameTaglineLogoKey messagesElevator pitch.A limited rebrand includes three or fewer of these elements.Here are the highlights of this study and what they may mean for your organization:The Good News: Nonprofits that Rebrand Raise More Money.According to the study, most organizations invest in rebranding in hopes of connecting more quickly and firmly with individual donors and prospects. Statistics show those hopes are the reality for many organizations.Fifty percent of organizations surveyed reported revenue growth, with the greatest increase seen in individual giving. This success rate is particularly striking since many participating organizations were in the process or rebranding, or had done so within the last one to two years, so felt it was too early to assess the impact of those changes.Organizations that Comprehensively Rebrand See Greatest ROI.More than half (56%) of the organizations that completed a comprehensive rebrand saw revenue increase, compared to 41% of organizations that implemented limited rebranding.And the impact of comprehensive rebranding exceed revenue gains. The survey found that organizations making more comprehensive changes are likely to see these additional wins:Greater audience participation, from program registration to activism.Improved staff ability and confidence to communicate effectively about the organization, its impact, and value.More media coverage.Several Factors Influence Rebrand Results.The data shows that results stem from more than the rebrand itself. Organizations that rebrand with any or all of these elements already in place are far more likely to get to goal:New, clear organizational focus or strategic plan (within last 12 months)New leadershipStaff and leadership committed to advancing branding and communications changes.In other words, these factors lead to relevant and robust rebrands. If your organization has any or all of these success factors in place, rebranding may well deliver significant value! Dig into the full report from Big Duck to learn more about if, and how, rebranding done right is likely to move the needle for your fundraising efforts.Bonus: Nonprofit branding is important so don’t ignore it. Are you reflecting your brand in all aspects of your giving experience: Events, donation pages, emails, and peer-to-peer campaigns? If not, we can help. Talk to a rep to learn more.last_img read more

New MHTF Topics Page: Post-2015: What’s Next for Maternal Health?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is pleased to announce the launch of our latest topic page: “Post-2014: What’s next for maternal health?” Along with our ongoing guest blog series on the proposed maternal health goal for the post-2015 development agenda, the topics page will compile key findings and debates on the position of maternal health in ongoing global and national discussions of health and development goals and challenges. The page includes resources on progress and lessons learned under the MDG framework, as well as on the position of maternal health in the ongoing process for developing the next global development framework. As with all of our topics pages, the post-2015 topics page will serve as a hub, featuring the latest in research, news and debates. To recommend a resource, please contact us.  If you would like to submit a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on proposed maternal health targets, please email Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

Every Newborn Action Plan Now Available for Comments

first_imgPosted on February 3, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The WHO recently released a draft version of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) for public comment. The ENAP addresses progress toward improving newborn survival in recent years, along with persistent challenges for accelerating progress. It also notes the opportunities presented by growing global commitments to improve health across the continuum of care for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. Once finalized, the ENAP will be presented at the upcoming World Health Assembly in May 2014. From the draft: The Every Newborn: an action plan to end preventable deaths is a roadmap for change. It sets out a vision and proposes a goal and targets to end newborn deaths from preventable causes. Five guiding principles and five strategic objectives are at the core of the plan. The action plan is based on evidence and considers the main causes on newborn mortality and effective interventions to prevent and manage these. It builds on the intrinsic links between maternal and newborn health and promotes state-of-the-art knowledge of effective delivery approaches for the interventions and innovations to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage. The plan is also informed by a systematic review of the progress in addressing newborn survival globally in the last decade.The announcement  notes that the ENAP will be linked with “specific plans and targets for maternal health” that are now under development. To join the online consultation on the draft ENAP, submit comments using WHO’s online form by February 28. In addition to the online consultation, a public discussion of the draft will be held on February 12, in Washington, DC. For further details, visit MCHIP’s event announcement.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

The Need for Malaria Integration in Maternal and Newborn Health

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 11, 2014November 2, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The release of the Roll Back Malaria (RBM) Partnership’s report, “The Contribution of Malaria Control to Maternal and Newborn Health,” made yesterday, July 10th, 2014, an important day for malaria in pregnancy research and programming. Pregnancy was previously identified as a particularly vulnerable time to contract malaria for both mom and baby, but this is the first time the RBM Partnership has released a thematic report specifically dedicated to how malaria affects pregnant women and their newborns.The report was launched during the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC) in New York by UN health and development leaders. The purpose of the report launch was to forge new partnerships and strengthen existing ones to expand malaria services to one of the most vulnerable populations, pregnant women.An existing solution, with poor deliveryIntermittent preventative treatment during pregnancy (IPTp) and insecticide-treated mosquito nets (ITNs) have long been the standard for malaria prevention in pregnancy. In 2012, the World Health Organization (WHO) updated these standards by increasing the number of IPTp doses to four during pregnancy. This treatment, delivered during antenatal care (ANC), has existed for decades, but delivery is still poor. Although 77% of pregnant women receive at least one ANC visit in most countries, rates of IPTp and ITN use by pregnant women fall far below global and national targets.Why is malaria prevention part of maternal health?Malaria is both a direct and indirect cause of maternal mortality. Each year 10,000 pregnant women die of malaria infection. In addition, malaria is a major cause of anemia,  which  puts a woman at greater risk for post-partum hemorrhage, the number one cause of maternal death. WHO’s recommended treatment, four doses of IPTp and use of an ITN, can reduce severe maternal anemia by 38% and perinatal mortality by 27%. The treatment’s effectiveness plays a significant role in leading global progress on decreasing maternal mortality. But malaria prophylaxis saves not only women’s lives, but newborn lives as well.Protecting health before birthIPTp and use of ITNs can reduce a newborn’s risk of dying from malaria by 18% in the first 28 days of life; it also provides a 21% decrease in low birth weight, a risk factor for neonatal death. Every year, 75,000 to 200,000 infants die because of a  malaria infection during pregnancy. Also, an additional 100,000 neonatal deaths, or 11% of global neonatal mortality, are due to low birth weight resulting from Plasmodium falciparum, or malaria, infections in pregnancy.Although scale-up of IPTp and ITNs did not meet the global coverage target of 80%, malaria prevention efforts between 2009 and 2012 saved about 94,000 newborns. If global targets had been met, this number could have tripled, with 300,000 neonatal deaths prevented. In addition to preventing neonatal deaths, IPTp and ITNs can reduce miscarriages and stillbirths by 33%.Next stepsAlthough the WHO has given clear guidelines through Focused Antenatal Care (FANC), there is often fragmentation across ANC delivery platforms. Fragmentation makes it difficult to effectively deliver prophylactic malaria interventions through ANC. Solutions to this problem include integration of both funding and service-delivery for malaria, ANC, and maternal health interventions. In addition, countries must harmonize malaria control and maternal health efforts in national policies, guidelines, and funding. Malaria prevention is not just an addendum to current maternal and newborn health interventions, it ensures maternal and newborn health.  With integration we can save lives.Share this:last_img read more

Maternal Health Jobs

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 21, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Looking for a job in maternal health? Here’s a round up of what’s available:Jhpiego – Maternal Health Team Leader; Program Officer IICARE – Senior Technical Advisor for Maternal and Child Health; Senior Technical Advisor for Maternal and Child NutritionBill & Melinda Gates Foundation – Senior Program Officer, Maternal Newborn and Child HealthMerck for Mothers – DirectorTo apply, go to this link. Select “Merck Kenilworth” as Location and “Long Term Assignment” as Position Type. Click “search” and select Job Number 301.Share this:last_img read more

“Taking Measure of Growth Charts” Published in The Wall Street Journal

first_imgPosted on December 22, 2014October 28, 2016By: Alison Chatfield, Project Manager, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Are newborn growth charts one size fits all? Are growth charts developed based on how babies in the U.S. have grown in the past applicable in the U.S. today, or to countries around the world? Is it possible to create truly global standards for how a baby should grow?These are the questions at the heart of a new article published in The Wall Street Journal by Jo Craven McGrinty. Current practice has physicians assess a newborn’s weight and length against growth charts generated from data on previous births in the country they live in. This practice could work if a country’s population is completely healthy, and therefore provides an optimal standard for comparison. But, if it isn’t, then using population-specific standards can lead to certain characteristics of poor growth becoming institutionalized. What is needed are growth standards that provide an indication of how babies should grow under optimal conditions, rather than comparing growth to how babies have grown in the past.Enter, the INTERGROWTH-21st Project. The INTERGROWTH-21st Project has created globally validated growth standards that provide a universal norm of how babies shouldgrow under optimal conditions. By including approximately 60,000 healthy women from eight countries in the study, the project was able to develop true norms for fetal growth and newborn size that can be used in any country.Like the WHO Child Growth Standards before it, the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are poised to replace national-level growth references that describe how babies have grown in the past. The article ends on a forward-looking note, acknowledging that the INTERGROWTH-21st charts are just one of several assessment tools that are needed to inform interventions to improve maternal and newborn health, “but measurements pegged to good health are a start,” McGrinty concludes.The full article can be found at the Wall Street Journal.This article was reposted from the INTERGROWTH-21st blog.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

How to Train Providers Where Maternal Mortality is Highest

first_imgPosted on February 13, 2015October 28, 2016By: Atziri Ramírez Negrin, Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and ResearchClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)In Mexico, maternal mortality continues to be a public health problem. Throughout the country, the burden of maternal mortality varies greatly between different locations. The three states with the highest maternal mortality ratio are Guerrero, Oaxaca, and Chiapas. The main causes of maternal mortality continue to be hypertensive pregnancy disorders and postpartum haemorrhage.Medical interns practice management of postpartum hemorrhageIn order to help meet the needs of these underserved and high-burdened states, newly graduated medical students are required to oversee a low-income community for an internship year after completing medical school. However, this means that the most inexperienced clinicians are caring for the most vulnerable with restricted access to other medical assistance.Based on these worrisome facts, the director of community service at the National University and I decided to organize a three-day course covering pre-eclampsia and postpartum haemorrhage (PPH) for the soon-to-be doctors of the most affected areas in Mexico. We hosted 160 students, which was a big challenge, but an encouraging one.The first day a very important question was posed to the medical students: “How many of you have seen a woman die from postpartum haemorrhage?” The answer was shocking: half of the medical students had witnessed a maternal death caused by PPH during their short practice.The students were trained using both e-learning modules and hands-on experience. The PPH and pre-eclampsia/eclampsia e-learning modules were created by the Oxford Maternal and Perinatal Health Institute and Geneva Foundation for Medical Education and Research (GFMER). The three hands-on PPH simulations were key to solidifying knowledge presented in the e-learning modules.At the first station, students practiced risk factor assessments and bleeding measurement. A series of clinical cases were posed where risk factors were reviewed. Also, students were handed gauzes and compresses soaked in red liquid to practice assessing what different quantities of blood looked like.At the second station, students learned how to build a low cost balloon for uterine tamponade with condoms and Foley catheters. They then practiced inserting the balloon in a pelvis model to treat simulated PPH.At the last station, participants were faced with a delivery patient model where they assisted a delivery, practiced shoulder dystocia maneuvers, implemented the active management of the third stage of labour and followed a PPH protocol, which included pharmacological strategies.Students were asked if they considered the training course interesting and useful and the answer was an overwhelming, yes! Ninety six percent considered it very useful and interesting. One of the most curious comments during the feedback was that although students considered the training adequate for their skill level, 50% thought it should have been given much earlier, since the skills were needed for many cases during medical school.Overall the course participants and staff had a great time. Hopefully this will become a routine course every year and perhaps available to all medical school students before they finish their career!Any comments or suggestions, please feel free to e-mail the author at:atziriok@yahoo.comShare this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Digital Fundraising and the Modern Donor

first_imgThe modern fundraising landscape has gone digital and there’s no going back. If you want to stay relevant, you need to keep up. Technology has changed the face of our daily interactions and engagement. Social media and text messaging offer instant connection. Smartphones allow you to make calls, check email, play music, download apps, and more. Fitbits track our health and fitness patterns. All of this leads to greater personalization; experiences tailored to the individual. Netflix sends “Top Suggestion” emails based on viewing history. Amazon recommends items based on recent searches. Donors are looking for similarly unique experiences from the nonprofits they support. Whether you’re new to digital fundraising or a seasoned pro, embracing the digital revolution will add value to your donor relationships and boost engagement levels. But, how to create accessibility and transparency in the digital age? The answer’s at your fingertips. Use digital tools—your website, social media, email blasts, online advertising—to engage donors. To learn more, download Fundraising in the Digital Age. Keep reading for a sneak peek into the guide.What Modern Donors WantThe modern donor wants more access to your organization. Share frequent updates about your work and the impact of their gifts. Donors are much more likely to make a second gift if they receive a personalized communication detailing the influence of their support.Digital fundraising is also a great opportunity for your nonprofit to be discovered online. Harness the power of search engine optimization (SEO) to improve your positioning in search engine results. This will allow your website to increase awareness of your mission and attract new donors.Creating a donor-centric experience puts donors at the heart of everything you do and say. Use this approach online as well as in person. Solicit your donor’s opinion, create new ways for them to connect with you, and watch their loyalty grow.Gone are the days of passive donors who write a check and disappear. Today’s donors want to be actively included in your work. Thanks to your digital toolkit and technology such as Network for Good’s donor management system, there’s no reason not to give them the experience they crave. Read more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Rezarta Haxhillari

first_imgRezarta joined the NFG family as Director of Customer Experience. She is passionate about making an impact and giving back in any way she can. Her goal is to empower nonprofits so they can “do more good” in their communities. Rezarta is a seasoned traveler and has been all around the world! In her free time, you can catch Rezarta watching The Bachelor franchise and planning her next adventure!“I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine.”Q&A with Rezarta Haxhillari, Customer Experience DirectorWhat do you do at Network for Good?I lead our Customer Experience team, which ensures we deliver the best experience possible to all our customers. Our goal is to successfully on-board customers when they first join the NFG family and encourage continued engagement with our products and services throughout their journey with us. By doing so, we are helping them achieve their organizational goals that allow them to “Do More Good” in the communities they serve.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I served as an Executive Director of a nonprofit organization called The Gjergj Kastrioti Scholarship Fund for three years. I now serve on the organization’s Board of Directors. I believe this experience is very valuable for my current role at NFG as I have a deep understanding of the challenges some of our customers may face.What attracts you to nonprofits? I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine. At NFG, we help thousands of nonprofits and charities daily. Consequently, we have an indirect influence on the ability to change people’s lives, which is an incredibly rewarding feeling!What do you enjoy most about your work? I enjoy speaking with our customers and hearing about the milestones and growth they are reaching as a result of using our products and services. I’m a proponent of adding convenience in everyday tasks. So, it’s extremely rewarding to hear when our platform makes their lives easier and helps them become successful.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I love to travel. In fact, I’ve visited over 40 countries! It’s gratifying to visit and learn about new cultures and historical facts unique to each country I visit. When I travel somewhere new, I visit local museums, take part in interesting attractions, and explore the restaurant scene (so much delicious food to be tried!)Lightning RoundDream vacation? Not sure about a dream vacation destination, but a two-week vacation to any new country is always a good idea! During the first week I would tour the city, eat local food, listen to local music and get a sense of the area’s unique characteristics. The second week would be just a period to relax. Maybe a beach in that country? Yes, that sounds like a lovely vacation Most recent book read? I just finished “End Game” by David Baldacci and I would absolutely recommend it if you’re into fast-paced thrillers. I’m also a fan of anything written by James Patterson and John Grisham. All three write quick page-turners!Last movie seen in movie theater? “Green Book”, an Oscar-nominated biographical comedy-dramaTheme song? “Happy” by PharrellFavorite color? FuchsiaAll time favorite athlete? Serena WilliamsRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

Improving Health Facility Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH) for Enhanced Delivery of Quality Maternal and Newborn Health Services in Kenya

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on March 22, 2018March 23, 2018By: Abdi Hassan, WASH Specialist, UNICEF Kenya; Lutomia Mangala, Health Specialist, UNICEF KenyaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Efforts for improving maternal and newborn health (MNH) often focus on implementing specific measures of maternity care, strengthening health systems and increasing women’s demand for giving birth in health care facilities—sometimes with little or no attention paid to the conditions of the places in which women give birth. Among these conditions is the availability—or lack—of clean water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) facilities.Inadequate access to clean waterA 2015 World Health Organization (WHO) rapid assessment of WASH coverage in health care facilities in 54 low- and middle-income countries found that 38% of these facilities lacked access to an improved water source, or one that is likely to be protected from outside contamination. Furthermore, 35% did not have water and soap for handwashing, and 19% did not have improved sanitation, or a system that hygienically separates human excreta from human contact. The percentage of facilities without improved water rose to 42% when only countries in the African region were considered.This is consistent with the situation in some parts of Kenya, where a 2016 multi country analysis of WASH in the childbirth environment found only 18% of women delivered in an environment with improved water. UNICEF in Kenya has been supporting the government of Kenya over the past year to improve WASH conditions in select health facilities in the MNH high-burden districts of Kakamega, Homa Bay, Turkana, Garissa and Nairobi.A clean water, sanitation and energy planTo identify health facilities in great need of improved WASH facilities, UNICEF in partnership with United Nations Office for Project Services (UNOPS) supported the government in undertaking a comprehensive assessment of health facilities to determine their WASH birth environment. One example is Homa Bay County’s Nyandiwa Health Centre, which—despite being on the shores of the second largest fresh water lake by area in the world—had no reliable supply of clean water. Nyandiwa was among 50 priority health facilities in the five districts that were eventually selected for a clean water and sanitation improvement plan.The improvements at Nyandiwa entailed rehabilitation and upgrading of existing water supply system to provide sustained WASH services to the health facility. An automatic water pump on the shores of Lake Victoria pumps water from the lake to raised water tanks with a combined capacity of 20,000 liters. These act as a reservoir and are connected through a piped system to various water delivery points within the health center, including the delivery room.A UNICEF-supported green energy project has also installed a solar system which provides reliable energy to the water pumping equipment, as well as lighting to the sanitation and hygiene facilities. Health facility managers and workers were trained on hygiene promotion as well as on operation and maintenance of the water system for sustained delivery of WASH services. For example, the health center has trained and assigned a Community Health Assistant to conduct routine operation and maintenance of the WASH facilities. The health center also conducts regular cleaning of the rain water harvesting tanks which provide clean drinking water for the staff and patients.Impact on maternal newborn healthAt health facilities, hygiene workers deliver messages promoting safe waste disposal, handwashing at critical times and drinking safe water through sessions with mothers during routine maternal, newborn and child health visits as well as through posters and fliers. Although there is a dearth of rigorous research quantifying the impact of WASH on MNH outcomes, available evidence, based on biological plausibility, suggests WASH interventions could improve MNH. It is therefore hoped the improvement in WASH in Nyandiwa and the other 49 health facilities will contribute to improvements in MNH service utilisation, and ultimately better health outcomes for mothers and newborns. Governments should develop plans and frameworks to continue improving WASH in health facilities and ensure that adequate financial resources are available to realize these goals.—Join the conversation on World Water Day by using #WorldWaterDay.Read about giving birth without clean water.Photo Credit: Eric Sakwa, UNOPS Engineer, KenyaShare this:last_img read more

Can a Human Centered Design Approach to Group Antenatal Care Improve Women’s Pregnancy and Birth Experiences?

first_imgShare this: Community members share their perceptions of pregnancy and antenatal care and ideas for making visual aids more culturally relevant.While all of these influencers care about the baby’s health, they generally believe the woman’s health is secondary. Our research highlighted the critical need to help community members understand the link between antenatal care and a woman’s and baby’s health.Based on our discussions with community members, we realized the need to emphasize the link between a woman’s health and that of her baby.Co-creating pregnancy clubs with women and providersWhen designing the group antenatal care model in Kenya, as in Uganda, we wanted to ensure that it improved the pregnancy and birth experience of the women participants, while enhancing — not burdening — the workflow of the health care providers. As a result of these discussions, and building on our experience forming groups in Uganda, we engaged women and providers in the creation of the Lea Mimba pregnancy club in Kenya.A calendar contains a health record and useful visuals that help women to track their own and their baby’s health.We adapted the Uganda group antenatal care curriculum to comply with national standards and guidelines for maternal and newborn health while meeting the current World Health Organization recommendations of eight antenatal care contacts. We also incorporated elements of self-care where women participate in taking their weight and recording their blood pressure, and facilitators encouraged women to build relationships and meet with club members outside of group sessions. To support the group model, we collaborated with local midwives and health care staff to develop a package of implementation materials that can be adapted for use in other settings, including a training curriculum; health care provider job aids; visual and tactile materials; supervision and monitoring tools and community engagement tools.Posters, flyers, and aprons were designed to spark public interest in the Lea Mimba Club and its functions.We observed and requested feedback from women and providers who participated in mock pregnancy club sessions. Participants commented on their experiences engaging in or leading the sessions, their understanding of the health topics and the usefulness and relevance of the implementation materials. During these sessions, we noticed that some women were initially quiet, but they became more involved when health care providers told stories or invited participants to sing songs that convey health messages. Women passed around a ball to indicate their turn to speak, and at times, even asked for the ball.After these mock sessions, participants continued to talk about what they learned as they waited for their individual appointments with midwives. They agreed that it would be easiest to attend sessions on market days, and midwives recommended that sessions take place in the afternoon when clinics are less crowded. Midwives noted that the group format also saved them time, as they could share more advice and information than was possible during one-on-one antenatal care appointments. Based on these observations and comments from the mock session participants, we revised the session structure and accompanying materials.Health care providers review the Lea Mimba message scrolls and share their thoughts on the usefulness of these tools.Pregnancy clubs in sessionWe have started pregnancy clubs in six facilities in Kakamega County. Groups comprise eight to 10 women of similar gestational ages, and we emphasize that each club session is a confidential and safe space for women to talk about their pregnancies, even if they are not yet ready to declare their pregnancy to the community.As health facilities host pregnancy clubs, we will continue to engage community members in discussions on the importance of antenatal care for all women and babies and encourage them to refer women to their local Lea Mimba pregnancy club.To learn more about our work, visit msh.org and stay up to date with MSH by subscribing to our email series. Listen to the Lea Mimba Pregnancy Club Song: Lea Mimba Club participants sing a song with the message that healthy pregnancies ensure children’s health. Recording by M4ID.Photo credit: M4ID—This post originally appeared on Medium.Read more about group antenatal care>> Posted on August 22, 2018September 21, 2018By: Priyam Sharda, Design Research Lead for M4ID; Shafia Rashid, Senior Technical Advisor, Family Care International (FCI) Program of Management Sciences for HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)“For the first three months, the baby is just blood. There’s nothing there to take care of,” said one Kenyan father-to-be in Kakamega County, Western Kenya, where we were meeting with communities and health care providers to learn about their attitudes toward women’s health, pregnancy and care at health facilities.“A baby is a blessing from God,” said the mother-in-law of a pregnant woman during another community discussion. “He alone knows how it grows.”Using insights from these community discussions, Management Sciences for Health (MSH) worked with M4ID, a social impact design company specializing in development and health, to develop a group antenatal care model that meets the needs of young women, adolescent girls (ages 10–24), and health care providers. With support from the UK’s County Innovation Challenge Fund program, the Lea Mimba project (“take care of your pregnancy” in Swahili) used a human-centered design approach to adapt a successful pregnancy club model that MSH and M4ID developed in the Eastern Ugandan communities of Mbale and Bududa in 2016.center_img M4ID uses human-centered design to create solutions that address health and development challenges. Communities actively engage in each step of the process to ensure that solutions are culturally relevant and meet their needs.From traditional to group antenatal careStarting antenatal care early in pregnancy is critical for protecting the health and wellbeing of women and their babies, but in Western Kenya, only about 20% of pregnant women attend their first visit before the fourth month of pregnancy (DHS 2014). Through antenatal care visits, health care providers can detect and treat pregnancy-related complications, such as pre-eclampsia and anemia, before they become life-threatening. Antenatal care visits provide opportunities for health care providers to encourage women to deliver their babies with the help of skilled birth attendants and to promote breastfeeding and other healthy postnatal behaviors.However, traditional one-on-one antenatal care often does not meet women’s and adolescents’ needs for information, support and high-quality clinical care. In Kakamega County, women often must wake up around 7:00 AM to go to the clinic, only to spend most of their time there in the waiting room. During standard antenatal care visits, providers spend between 10 and 15 minutes with each woman, but adolescents and those who are pregnant for the first time may need additional time to learn and understand health information.In recent years, group care models have emerged in low-income countries as a promising approach to provide high-quality antenatal care and promote social support among women during pregnancy. Women go through pregnancy as a cohort, learning through discussion and building bonds with one other and their antenatal care providers.Community perceptions of pregnancy and health careWe asked community members, potential clients and providers how women experience pregnancy and health care in their communities and how providers deliver that care.Several barriers continue to disrupt women’s and adolescents’ access to care, including a lack of high-quality services and information, limited individual and community awareness and support and low male engagement. Several actors —including recently pregnant peers, midwives, community health volunteers, male partners and mothers-in-law— influence a woman’s decision to use antenatal care services. Peers are an important early source of information, as doctors and other authority figures are considered difficult to approach. Mothers-in-law might uphold traditional, cultural beliefs that prevent suggested behavior change, while male partners provide the money or transportation to visit the clinic. We learned that pregnancy is only socially acknowledged toward the end of the second trimester, which deters women from going a health facility early in their pregnancy. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Under pressure over single 7B budget vote Liberals make a tweak

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government is announcing a slight change to its plan to streamline the spending-approval process into a single $7-billion vote after complaints earlier this week from the parliamentary budget watchdog.Speaking to a House of Commons committee, Treasury Board President Scott Brison says the Liberals’ plan to make the process more transparent will now ensure that the detailed spending allocations laid out in the budget plan are also listed in the bill that MPs will actually vote on.Brison is making the announcement following warnings from parliamentary budget officer Jean-Denis Frechette that the plan to simplify the budgeting process through a single vote could mean $7 billion in new spending commitments from the February budget could technically be spent elsewhere.The PBO warned this week that there was nothing in the wording of the new law to compel Ottawa to spend according to its budget plan — and political opponents, meanwhile, have attacked the plan as a way for the government to open up a $7-billion slush fund.Responding to the budget office concerns, Brison says the argument that budget promises would not be legally binding under the new law is false because straying from the detailed items would be considered an unauthorized use of public funds.Nonetheless, Brison says to add more clarity to the process he will now ensure the full, line-by-line spending table is repeated in the bill that MPs will vote on, rather than just a reference to it.last_img read more

Province launches catchup immunization program to protect against measles

first_img“With this catch-up campaign, we can really work to reach herd immunity where at least 95% of the population is vaccinated. It will also help better prepare parents to be aware of vaccination status, for when we introduce the next step of mandatory reporting of school-age children’s vaccination status this fall.”Without a record of immunization (or proof of immunity to a disease), a person is considered unimmunized and unprotected and should generally be immunized or re-immunized to ensure protection. It is safe to repeat immunizations.Parents should check their children’s immunization records to be sure they are up-to-date. If they are unsure or do not have the records handy, they can check with their primary care provider or public-health unit. Parents can provide their child’s records to their local public-health unit for entry into the provincial immunization registry. If a child’s current immunization record is already on file with the local health unit, parents do not need to provide it again.Health authorities will be working with schools to notify parents of upcoming measles immunization catch-up clinics, information about measles and what to expect if your child needs a measles immunization. Health authorities will contact families with under or unimmunized children through a variety of actions, including direct-calling families, sending emails and letters, and working with schools on newsletters. “With outbreaks of measles occurring globally and here in B.C., we know we will see threats of further outbreaks and can be doing more to raise immunization rates,” said Adrian Dix, Minister of Health. “That is why we are launching a catch-up program to immunize children from kindergarten to Grade 12 who have not previously been immunized against measles and to provide a dose for those who may not have received both doses.“Our goal is to immunize as many people as possible before the end of the school year. The purpose, ultimately, is to reach an immunization rate of 95% as recommended.”“Safeguarding the health and well-being of children, staff and teachers who come into our classrooms and their family members at home is one of our highest priorities,” said Rob Fleming, Minister of Education. “The K-12 education system plays a critical role in raising awareness of the importance of childhood vaccines and increasing immunization rates. We are continuing to work across government, and with our education and health community partners, to help curb preventable outbreaks and increase student safety.”For this catch-up campaign, the Province is initially purchasing $3 million in the vaccine – the equivalent of a one year supply of vaccine.The catch-up program is the first step in the government’s two-phase plan to educate people about the importance of immunization and help them become aware of their immunization status. Offering the measles immunization catch-up program now will also help prepare parents for the mandatory reporting of vaccination status, which is planned for the fall of 2019.“Very few people in B.C. are against all vaccinations,” said Dr. Brian Emerson, deputy provincial health officer. “Due to a variety of other factors, measles immunization rates in B.C. are lower than they should be to ensure herd immunity. VICTORIA, B.C. – The Province shares they are launching a measles immunization catch-up program to help B.C. families ensure their children are protected from measles.The program will run from April through June 2019 will be delivered by Health authorities. According to the Government, the program will be made available in schools to children (from kindergarten to Grade 12), public health units, community health centres and mobile community clinics in select regions.The program will be delivered similarly with some regional variations. By offering it in schools, public-health units and community health centres, the catch-up program is designed to make it simpler and stress-free for parents to ensure their children are adequately protected from measles. Pharmacists will also be part of the efforts to increase immunization rates shared by the Government.last_img read more

Heres An Idea Falcons Throw To Julio Jones In The Red Zone

Julio Jones is unlike most other star receivers. He doesn’t scream at his quarterback or sulk or throw a tantrum when passes don’t come his way. He’s happy to share the wealth with his teammates. In short, he’s no diva.But if any NFL wide receiver has earned the right to complain on the sidelines, it’s Jones. The Falcons star hasn’t scored a touchdown this season — and in fact has underperformed his whole career when it comes to scoring. His touchdown rate has never come close to matching his outsized production everywhere else on the field. So maybe the Falcons — who have scored just 17 points in each of their past two games (both losses) heading into their Super Bowl rematch with the Patriots on Sunday — would actually benefit from Jones flipping a Gatorade cooler or two.Since 2014, Jones has been nothing short of unstoppable. He’s been the NFL’s most productive receiver when measured by yards per game, the second best in terms of receptions per game and the third best in yards per target.1Among all wide receivers and tight ends who have averaged at least 50 yards in at least 25 games since 2014. In those three-plus seasons, he’s averaging 104.8 yards but a ho-hum 0.4 touchdowns per game, which is roughly the same as less-heralded wideouts such as Allen Hurns, Emmanuel Sanders and Jordan Matthews. For an elite receiver, Jones is solidly middle-of-the-pack in touchdown production: Last Sunday, Atlanta lost to the Dolphins in the final minute when Ryan forced a pass in double coverage to second-year tight end Austin Hooper (36 career catches) instead of giving Jones a chance to make a play. The result was a game-ending interception at the Miami 6-yard line. While Jones said nothing, head coach Dan Quinn made it clear that he wasn’t pleased with bypassing his team’s best weapon.Atlanta’s strange unwillingness to use its best receiver has now spanned three offensive coordinators. When the current one, Steve Sarkisian, was handed the keys to the offense that in 2016 led the NFL in scoring, he saw one major area where the unit could improve.“Is there a way to get Julio more touches in the red zone and finding those matchups?” Sarkisian said at the time.The answer, apparently, is “no.”Check out our latest NFL predictions. The 51 receivers on the chart above average a scoring strike every 157.1 yards. Jones averages a TD for every 262 yards he accumulates, which is the third most extreme discrepancy in the sample.2Only Vincent Jackson and Willie Snead have Jones beat here, with 343.6 and 270 yards per touchdown respectively. The Dallas Cowboys’ Dez Bryant, meanwhile, leads all receivers in fewest yards per touchdown, 92.7, but that’s probably no accident: Bryant has long made it clear that he expects a big portion of the touchdown glory — or someone, possibly everyone, is going to hear about it.Jones’s scoring woes almost defy explanation. Receivers who thirst for touchdowns are generally undersized players who do their damage between the 20s. But Jones is one of the game’s largest targets at 6-foot-3, 220 pounds. He’s also one of the position’s best athletes, crushing his scouting combine in speed, jumping ability and agility. It’s tough to imagine a better receiver his size on the NFL boundaries when it comes to getting both feet down inbounds and defying gravity in the process. If an NFL quarterback were to design a perfect red-zone weapon in a lab, he would look a lot like Jones.Incredibly, Jones’s lack of scoring seems to be by design. His percentage of QB Matt Ryan’s targets drops steadily the closer Atlanta gets to the goal line: from 32.8 percent of passes when the Falcons are at least 80 yards from the end zone to just a little more than half that — 16.7 percent — when they’re in the red zone. read more

Ohio State field hockey set for Big Ten tournament quarterfinal vs Northwestern

OSU sophomore forward Maddy Humphrey (23) during a game against California on Oct. 25 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 6-3. Credit: Robert Scarpinito | Copy ChiefOhio State field hockey is set to face fourth-seeded and No. 17 Northwestern in the opening game of the Big Ten Tournament, where the winner will move on to compete against top-seeded Maryland or eighth-seeded Michigan State.Northwestern (12-7, 4-4) and OSU last met less than a month ago when they squared off at Buckeye Varsity Field in a game in which the Wildcats scored once in each half. Those two goals were enough to defeat OSU in shutout fashion, 2-0. OSU hopes to increase offensive pressure this time around, coach Anne Wilkinson said.“We can’t give up the amount of shots we’ve given up in the past,” Wilkinson said. “We haven’t generated enough attacks and been able to sustain them so we need to take more shots and challenge more of these goalkeepers.”Sophomore forward Morgan Kile said one of the main components going into the tournament is putting all of the pieces together one last time. “I think the key thing for our team going into the tournament is to put all the skills and things we’ve worked on throughout the season together,” Kile said. “We need to really show Northwestern what we can do out there.”The Buckeyes will enter the tournament with three players being awarded All-Big Ten honors. Senior co-captains Peanut Johnson and Emma Royce, along with sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey, were bestowed the awards after their efforts this season. Johnson, Humphrey, Royce and Kile have all registered double-digit points, with Johnson and Humphrey being the fourth-highest scoring duo in the Big Ten this year with 53 total points. This year will be the Buckeyes’ 20th all-time appearance in the Big Ten tournament. Thrice they have taken home the Big Ten title. In 2001 and 2010, OSU was a co-champion, while it captured the outright crown in 2006. The last time OSU and Northwestern squared off against each other in the tournament was in 2013. In that game, Johnson registered a goal and an assist, pushing the Buckeyes to a 3-2 victory against the then-No. 13 Wildcats.In order to post another win this time around, Wilkinson said teamwork will be critical.“The most important thing is we have to play together,” Wilkinson said. “Sometimes they take too much on themselves and put too much weight on their individual ability. We just need to rely on each other and play as a team, and the results will take care of themselves. We have to work hard, which they have.”OSU and Northwestern are set face off at 10 a.m. on Thursday in Bloomington, Indiana. Defensive gainsOSU has given up 18 fewer goals this year — 56 last season compared to 38 in 2015 — as well as allowing 21 fewer shots (280 in 2014, 259 in 2015) and 10 fewer penalty corners (124 in 2014, 114 in 2015). Sophomore goalie Liz Tamburro finished the season with 124 total saves. She ranks second in the conference with 6.88 saves per game.Game results when OSU…Scores first: 7-0Leads at the half: 5-0Trails at the half: 2-9Is tied at the half: 2-0Outshoots its opponent: 4-3Is outshot: 5-6Is in a one-goal game: 4-2Is in a two-goal game: 5-7Heads to overtime: 1-1 read more

Baseball Ohio State faces hothitting coldpitching Xavier

Ohio State senior utility player Brady Cherry (1) swings at a ball during the game against Michigan on April 12. Ohio State won 10-5. Credit: Casey Cascaldo | Photo EditorThe Ohio State baseball team will aim to end an up-and-down homestretch on a positive note.Tuesday will mark Ohio State’s ninth home game in its past 10 games, and the Buckeyes (20-17, 4-5 Big Ten) have only won three of their eight games at Bill Davis Stadium over this stretch. A battle-tested Xavier (14-22, 5-1 Big East) squad will travel to Columbus for a bout with the Buckeyes. After a five-game skid that included a sweep by Northwestern at home, Ohio State has righted the ship, to an extent. The Buckeyes have taken four of their past five games, including a big series win over rival Michigan. Despite their record, the Musketeers have experience that could prove invaluable. Xavier has played No. 8 Louisville, No. 16 Arizona State and No. 17 North Carolina, going 1-6 in those matchups. Xavier has shown the potential to play with top-flight teams. The Musketeers played a three-game series at then-No. 13 Texas where the run differential was only three.In terms of Xavier’s offensive lineup, no single player sticks out; the strength is in the team’s balance. Five Musketeers are hitting within the range of .286 to .301. Junior infielder and pitcher Conor Grammes leads the team with a .301 average. Grammes has started on the mound nine times to earn a 5.53 ERA. Redshirt senior outfielder Jake Shepski has a team-high 24 RBI, while hitting .292 on the season. Behind a team batting average of .265, the Musketeers have scored an average of 5.36 runs a game.On the mound, Xavier has struggled mightily. With a team ERA of 6.71, the Musketeers only have two pitchers with an ERA below 5.50. The pitching staff is prone to allowing the long ball, allowing 47 home runs this season. This could prove advantageous for an Ohio State team that has hit 34 home runs this season. Senior Sam Czabala leads the team with a 1.19 ERA and .147 opponent batting average. The left-hander has pitched 22.2 innings in 12 appearances.The other pitcher with a sub-5.50 ERA is freshman Lane Flamm, who has a 3.55 ERA and a team-high four saves in 16 appearances. Ohio State will host Xavier at 6:35 p.m. Tuesday. read more

Fabianski West Ham eyeing an upset against Spurs

first_imgWest Ham goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski is hopeful of victory ahead of their London derby with Tottenham on SaturdayAfter enduring a torrid start to the new season, West Ham goes into this weekend’s showdown at the London Stadium with three wins in their last five matches.This includes impressive 3-1 victories over Everton and Manchester United.Now Fabianski hopes that West Ham can cause another upset against their heavily fancied London neighbours Spurs.“It’s another important one, another big one against a tough opponent, but we are playing at home so hopefully with all the hard work during the week we’ll be in good form for Saturday’s game,” Fabianski told the club website.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I’m looking forward to the atmosphere on Saturday. I’ve always enjoyed playing against Spurs – it has a nice atmosphere to it so I’m guessing it won’t be any different.“We just have to prepare ourselves well during the week and have a good game on Saturday, and make sure that the fans will be proud and happy after our performance.“You can see that we have improved, especially playing at home and the recent results here have been very good so hopefully that will continue this Saturday.”West Ham are 15th in the Premier League table with seven points from eight games.last_img read more

Joni Mitchell Gets Candid In New Biography

first_img Facebook GRAMMY winner finally opens up about her life in David Yaffe’s ‘Reckless Daughter: A Portrait Of Joni Mitchell’Renée FabianGRAMMYs Nov 8, 2017 – 12:17 pm Joni Mitchell has led a notoriously press-averse life — until now.In a new biography from David Yaffe titled Reckless Daughter: A Portrait Of Joni Mitchell, the GRAMMY winner has candidly opened up about her life in the world of rock and roll, and she doesn’t hold back.Rolling Stone highlights some of the notable moments, including her thoughts on one-time lover James Taylor, working with David Crosby as a producer, her thoughts on Bob Dylan’s Blood On The Tracks, singing while high with Neil Young, an encounter with Miles Davis, and sets the record straight about breaking up with Jackson Browne.Her uncensored memories serve as illuminating tidbits to complement the rest of Yaffe’s chronicle of the famed singer/songwriter’s life. Starting with her childhood, he works his way through all of her albums and their recording, her move toward jazz, and finally through her life-threatening aneurysm in 2015.Pick up your copy of this portrait of a legend for all the details you don’t want to miss. HBO Documentary Traces ‘Rolling Stone’ Music Culture Joni Mitchell Gets Candid In New Biography News Twitter Email Joni Mitchell Opens Up In Biography joni-mitchell-gets-candid-new-biographylast_img read more

Googles rumored Pixel 3A dons a purple hue in new leak

first_img Phones See It Now playing: Watch this: On Friday, Blass also tweeted an image of the rumored phone in a (very) light purple color. The side button on the purple phone appears to be yellow, while the earlier image of the phone had an orange button. 15 Pixel 3 features you should use right now See it Tags That phone, possibly also known as the Pixel 3 Lite, is rumored to include some of the same features as the current Pixel 3 but at a lower price. The Pixel 3 phones on store shelves today have received acclaim for their top-notch cameras and innovative features — but they’re expensive. The Pixel 3 starts at $799 (£739, AU$1,199), and the larger XL model starts at $899 (£869, AU$1,349). Blass’s photo follows a series of earlier leaks about the Pixel 3A, aka Pixel 3 Lite. In November 2018, the Russian blog Rozetked posted photos of a device that looked similar to the Pixel 3 but with larger bezels and a headphone jack, which neither the Pixel 3 nor 3 XL have. Adding to the mystery, the phone was pictured with a C-shaped logo on the back.  Google didn’t respond immediately to a request for comment. 6:32 Images of what’s purported to be a new Google phone: the Pixel 3A or Pixel 3 Lite.   AndroidHeadlines Editors’ Note, May 7, 2019: CNET’s Google Pixel 3A and Pixel 3A XL reviews are here. Read more about both phones and why Google decided to release these budget handsets. We expect to see the official fourth-generation Google flagship phone in the fall — probably October. But new photos continue to pop up showing another new Pixel phone that may preempt the Pixel 4, according to rumors. Leaker Evan Blass on Wednesday tweeted an image of a phone he says is the Google Pixel 3A. The same photo was also posted on Slashleaks, with the caption “Google Pixel 3A press render leaked.” Neither Blass nor Slashleaks posted any further details.  The date shown on the phone, however, is May 7 — the very day Google’s I/O conference is set to kick off. Sprint Mentioned Above Google Pixel 3 XL (64GB, just black) In purple. pic.twitter.com/hgcC1V7zxK— Evan Blass (@evleaks) April 26, 2019 Best Buy $929 Post a comment $929center_img See It Verizon Wireless $919 $949 See It CNET may get a commission from retail offers. 17 Photos Google Pixel 3 XL Review • Pixel 3 XL review: Everything we love about the Pixel 3 on a bigger screen New budget Pixels coming May 7? 0 Google Pixel 3a pic.twitter.com/WFb1bfvlK9— Evan Blass (@evleaks) April 24, 2019 Originally published April 24. Update, April 26: Adds image of rumored Pixel 3a in purple. Share your voice Android Pie Googlelast_img read more