The price of success? Warriors’ new $100 passes don’t include court view

first_imgThe Golden State Warriors, apparently desperate for cash, are offering their fans a Seinfeldian deal.You Gen Xers likely recall that “Seinfeld” was a sitcom about nothing. In a recent email sent to Warriors fans, the team announced a $100 pass that allows entry into Oracle Arena for every home game in a given month. The catch? The bearers are allowed to see nothing that happens on the court — unless they view it on a monitor in any of Oracle’s bars and restaurants.A Warriors spokesperson …last_img

Book Review: How Darwinism Corrodes Morality

first_imgAn important book by Dr Jerry Bergman documents the most important example ever of the dictum, “Ideas have consequences.”Jerry Bergman, How Darwinism Corrodes Morality: Darwinism, Immorality, Abortion and the Sexual Revolution. Joshua Press (2017).Three of the best books I have ever read about the cultural fallout of Darwinism have been: (1) The Long War Against God, by Henry Morris, Jr., (2) Darwin Day in America, by John West, and (3) How Darwinism Corrodes Morality, by Dr. Jerry Bergman. Of the three, the latter—new this year by Dr. Jerry Bergman, a contributing writer for Creation-Evolution Headlines—may be the most accessible and motivating of all. Its 294 pages leave you breathless with a withering display of well-documented accounts of people who took Darwin’s “dangerous idea” and ran with it. It leaves you with an overwhelming sense that this evil ideology must be stopped.I want to open the curtain with one of his concluding quotations about the Japanese soldiers in World War II, who justified these atrocities after learning how Darwinian evolution supported their notion of the Japanese as a superior race. [Warning: graphic information. You may want to shield your eyes from the next 3 paragraphs.][Japanese] brought atrocity and death on a scale that staggers the imagination. In the midst of it were the prisoners of war. Japan held some 132,000 POWs from America, Britain, Canada, New Zealand, Holland, and Australia. Of those, nearly 36,000 died, more than one in every four. Americans fared particularly badly; of the 34,648 Americans held by Japan, 12,935—more than 37 percent—died. By comparison, only 1 percent of Americans held by the Nazis and Italians died. Japan murdered thousands of POWs on death marches and worked thousads of others to death… including some 16,000 POWs who died alongside as many as 100,000 Asian laborers forced to build the Burma-Siam Railway.[In addition,] thousands of other POWs were beaten, burned, stabbed, or clubbed to death, shot, beheaded, killed during medical experiments, or eaten alive in ritual acts of cannibalism… [T]housands more died of starvation and easily preventable diseases. Of the 2,500 POWs at Borneo’s Sandakan camp, only 6… made it to September 1945 alive.Dr Bergman had previously described the infamous Rape of Nanking in 1937, called the one event that can be “held up as an example of the unmitigated evil lying just below the surface of unbridled military adventurism”. In an unprecedented “orgy of cruelty seldom if ever matched in world history,” some 20,000 to 80,000 women were raped and between 260,000 and 350,000 Chinese (considered ‘racially inferior’ to the Japanese) were murdered within a span of a few weeks. It’s not just the numbers, but the “diabological tortures” they were subjected to that makes this event unbelievable: hanging some by their tongues on iron hooks, burying some up to their waists and laughing at them as German shepherds tore them apart, roasting people alive. In one incident, two Japanese officers forced their men to round up hundreds of Chinese civilians just to see who could decapitate the most in a set period of time.Now that I have your attention, let’s see what was behind this. I can hear some evolutionists calling foul already; ‘These war atrocities can’t be blamed on Darwin,’ they will protest. ‘War is hell, and this is par for the course in any war; the Allies did some pretty mean things, too.’ (Let’s quickly remember the comfy quarters at Guantanamo to see American values about treatment of prisoners, and the screams that ensue any time the ‘torture’ of waterboarding—that causes zero lasting harm—is brought up.) Evolutionists will protest loud and long, that even if some of the Japanese intellectuals had embraced Darwinism, one cannot blame Darwin for what some people did with his ideas, which they must have misunderstood.Bergman’s book shows otherwise. He had just established how the Japanese elite, including Emperor Hirohito, had welcomed Darwinism as the new “rationalist” view to bring their country into the modern world. In the decades preceding the war, as in Germany, the intellectuals and political leaders of Japan embraced Darwinism as the explanation for their superiority. Lots of countries throughout history (Assyrians, Babylonians, Romans) had thought themselves superior, but this was different. The Nazis, fascists, communists and imperialists now had a “scientific” rationale for unmitigated evil against anyone who stood in their way. Darwin, along with Spencer and Malthus, had produced a world of struggle that was all about power. It was about crushing one’s opponents; why? –because the losers prove themselves as less evolved. The world thrived on competition and progressed by a “struggle for existence” thanks to Darwin’s “law” of natural selection. This was new in world ideology. Science rewards the brutal victor. In this view, war is necessary and good. What is ‘evil’ is mercy and caring for the ‘unfit.’The horrors of the Japanese holocaust form just the final episode in Bergman’s case that Darwinism corrodes morality. Before the reader even gets to chapter 16, he or she will have seen witness after witness point to Darwin as the father of the ideas that justified other moral atrocities: abortion, sexual adventurism, eugenics, racism, and even mass murder. He’s not just talking old history. In chapter 8, he describes the murderous escapade of Anders Breivik, who in 2011 killed 77 young people in Norway on a rampage motivated by his Darwinian beliefs, documenting the link with quotes from Breivik’s own manifesto. In this case, as in the others, Bergman doesn’t need to make the argument himself. In his matter-of-fact style, he lets the perpetrators indict themselves out of their own writings, and when those are not available, he cites leading historians who have written academic accounts of the events.History is, in fact, an important by-product of reading this book. Bergman has a knack for uncovering little-known facts about historical figures, including famous ones like Nietzche, Freud and Hitler, and for bringing to light lesser-known but influential persons like Havelock Ellis, Chet Raymo and Karl Pearson. Along the way, the reader will catch rarely-seen angles on Margaret Sanger, Alfred Kinsey, Charles Manson and others, showing their deep roots into Darwinism, and will learn about important historical trends in academia and education that resulted from Darwin’s conquest of the world’s elite and popular culture, such as social Darwinism, sex education and eugenics. Like Morris and West showed in their books, one cannot understand the 20th (and 21st) centuries without grasping the pervasive and pernicious influence of Darwinian thinking on every aspect of society.In the final two-page chapter, “Some Conclusions,” Bergman answers an important objection that might be raised to his thesis that Darwinism corrodes morality. If Darwinism is true, he admits, then “Obviously, no matter how much harm it has caused, this does not affect the truth of Darwinism.” But “Conversely, if evolution, given the standard definition of evolution of progression from simple molecules by random combinations of molecules to the first cell, and then eventually to humans by mutations and natural selection, is false, the harm caused by this erroneous idea is enormous.” For decades, Dr Gerald Bergman has been a leading scientist proving that Darwinian evolution is indeed false (see Fossil Forensics, his latest book, and his numerous scientific papers analyzing alleged proofs of evolution), and in this concluding chapter, he briefly offers scientific reasons for judging Darwinism to be wrong. Given that, the enormity of the harm brought by Darwin’s dangerous idea grows exponentially, because one can find his disciples today routinely extending Darwinism to the evolution of stars, galaxies, and even habitable universes in a multiverse. How Darwinism Corrodes Morality exposes, in gory detail, the evil fruit that sprang from a wicked tree planted by Charles Darwin. For that, this may be the most important book Bergman has yet written.Lest any critics try to counter with examples of Christianity corroding morality, let’s think about that a moment. There are clear-cut, undisputable accounts of ‘Christians’ doing awful things: burnings at the stake, inquisitions, religious wars, and the like. Up to the present day, examples continue that are grievous and inexcusable: pastors caught in adultery, sexual abuse by priests, and occasional attacks by Christian ‘extremists’ (although the Christians are most often the passive recipients of terror rather than the perpetrators; consider what has been happening in Syria, Iraq, and Egypt). The difference is in the foundation. You can’t find any justification for these things in the Bible. You cannot derive them from the teachings of Jesus or the disciples. When bad people do bad things in the name of Jesus, they are misusing His holy name, working in direct opposition to Christ’s command to love our enemies and do good to those who hate you. Darwinism’s disciples, by contrast, draw their ideas directly out of the old Bearded Buddha’s own words. Darwin may not have been a terrorist himself (by all accounts, he was a Victorian gentleman), but he predicted race wars and struggle for existence in his own writings. Darwin was not, by the way, a gifted scientist as is often portrayed, but was more of a selfish, conniving, cruel, God-hating schemer, as Jerry Bergman documents in another book worth reading, The Dark Side of Darwin. You cannot think of persons more opposite in their ideas, manners, and influences than Jesus Christ and Charles Darwin.I’ve read many books by Jerry Bergman. For me, this may be his best—for an odd reason. It made me angry. I got angry watching in page after page how a false doctrine based on a silly idea (natural selection, the Stuff Happens Law) brought so much suffering and bloodshed to the world. When you already know how silly natural selection is (see my essay), and then you see how it captivated the imaginations of so many influential people, it just makes you sick. I sometimes try to get people to laugh at Darwinian just-so stories (recent example), but we need to get beyond humor to anger. Like I often say, don’t think for a minute that the evil fruit of Darwin’s evil tree was exhausted in the 20th century. Darwinian sap still permeates the branches of universities and institutions today. It is still the state religion in America, the official curriculum in many schools, the evolving law of a progressive elite. A “new eugenics” is gaining traction in labs that want to breed a super-race, producing a society of haves and have-nots, the latter needing to be weeded out as unfit for modernity.More Darwinian evil is coming. Don’t just get angry. Fight it. Fight the silliness of just-so stories and the ugliness of ‘struggle for existence’ by supporting ministries like Creation-Evolution Headlines that daily shine light on the truth. And if you are an evolutionist reading this, fear not that radical creationists are going to round you up, bury you up to your waist and turn German shepherds loose on you. Fear not that we will see how many of you we can decapitate in an hour. Fear not that we will censor you, hate you, and ostracize you. No; that is our opponents’ way. If you run into a true Christian, he or she will gently look you in the eye, and with firm compassion, say, “Repent, and believe the good news” (Mark 1:15).(Visited 533 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

Tankoua wins NCAA Finals MVP in comeback season

first_imgLATEST STORIES Japan ex-PM Nakasone who boosted ties with US dies at 101 Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netLimited to a spectator in last year’s Finals, Donald Tankoua watched intently as his San Beda squad celebrated another title.The Cameroonian, who tore his ACL on his right knee late in the first round, wished he could have contributed to the title romp over Arellano.ADVERTISEMENT CPP denies ‘Ka Diego’ arrest caused ‘mass panic’ among S. Tagalog NPA With that in mind, Tankoua dilligently worked the hardest to regain his peak form in time for Season 93.READ: San Beda sweeps Lyceum for 21st NCAA championshipFEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSSEA Games: Philippines picks up 1st win in men’s water poloSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThough he couldn’t get to the level he desired, he stayed the course and did his part in coach Boyet Fernandez’ system to once again earn a spot in the Mythical Team.And in the NCAA Season 93 Finals, Tankoua made up for lost chance, averaging 22.0 points, 18.5 rebounds, 1.0 assist, and 1.0 steal in San Beda’s sweep of Lyceum to be named the NCAA Finals MVP. “Coming from an ACL injury, this is really special for me,” he said. “I really wanted to win it for me and my teammates.”He helped San Beda defy the odds against an erstwhile undefeated team in the Pirates and win back-to-back titles, its 10th in 12 years, and 21st overall.“I hope to win more championships in the coming seasons,” said Tankoua.ADVERTISEMENT Read Next For the complete collegiate sports coverage including scores, schedules and stories, visit Inquirer Varsity. Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH Stronger peso trims PH debt value to P7.9 trillion View comments UFC: Anderson Silva addresses 2nd failed drug test QC cops nab robbery gang leader, cohort Kammuri turning to super typhoon less likely but possible — Pagasa Trending Articles PLAY LIST 00:50Trending Articles00:50Trending Articles01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes01:37Protesters burn down Iran consulate in Najaf01:47Panelo casts doubts on Robredo’s drug war ‘discoveries’01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

NBA: Magic Johnson has no regrets trading D’Angelo Russell

first_imgFormer Los Angeles Lakers guard D’Angelo Russell  (AP Photo/Chris Carlson)Before Lonzo Ball took over the spotlight as the “point guard of the future” for the Los Angeles Lakers, the squad was raving about another promising young stud, D’Angelo Russell.Instead of letting the two duke it out for minutes at the point guard position, Lakers President of Basketball Operations Magic Johnson opted to  trade the former Ohio State Buckeye to the Brooklyn Nets and give full reigns to the UCLA product.ADVERTISEMENT Trump strips away truth with hunky topless photo tweet Lacson: SEA Games fund put in foundation like ‘Napoles case’ MOST READ Defending champion Karlovic wins in Hall of Fame tourney Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss PLAY LIST 02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City01:07Trump talks impeachment while meeting NCAA athletes02:49World-class track facilities installed at NCC for SEA Games His replacement, Ball, meanwhile, wowed fans during the recently concluded 2017 NBA Summer League en route to bagging the tournament MVP Award.  Khristian Ibarrola /raRELATED STORY:Johnson dazzled by Ball magic for LakersSports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Ethel Booba on hotel’s clarification that ‘kikiam’ is ‘chicken sausage’: ‘Kung di pa pansinin, baka isipin nila ok lang’ Speaking to ESPN’s Ohm Youngmisuk, the Laker executive shared that he had no qualms about trading the potential-laden player.“I am not one of them dudes. When I say bye, that’s it,” he said regarding the trade.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSSEA Games: Biñan football stadium stands out in preparedness, completionSPORTSPrivate companies step in to help SEA Games hostingSPORTSWin or don’t eat: the Philippines’ poverty-driven, world-beating pool stars“I keep moving. I can’t get caught in emotions and all that. That is not who I am. We moved and we kept moving. After that trade we went on to the next thing,” he added.Before assuming the front-office position for his former team, Johnson spoke highly of Russell and said he wanted to mentor the crafty lefty. Church, environmentalists ask DENR to revoke ECC of Quezon province coal plantcenter_img Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. View comments FEU Auditorium’s 70th year celebrated with FEU Theater Guild’s ‘The Dreamweavers’ Robredo should’ve resigned as drug czar after lack of trust issue – Panelo National Coffee Research Development and Extension Center brews the 2nd National Coffee Education Congress Hotel says PH coach apologized for ‘kikiam for breakfast’ claim READ: NBA: Laker great Magic Johnson would love to mentor D’Angelo RussellHowever, he opted to trade him for the betterment of the team after multiple franchises showed interest.“Like five teams called for D’Angelo [so] we knew that we could move D’Angelo for one of the pieces that we were looking for,” he explained.“So we decided on Brooklyn, they got a great player in D’Angelo and we got what we wanted,” he added.Although he played erratic at times, the 21-year-old Russell showed promise in his first two years donning the Purple and Gold.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIESlast_img read more

Medial collateral ligament pain

first_imgInitial treatment of an MCL injury includes ice to the area, elevation of the joint above the level of the heart, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), and limited physical activity until the pain and swelling subside. A hinged knee immobilizer should be used to protect the ligament as it heals. The extent of this type of injury is usually excessive stretching of the ligament causing the pain and tenderness.Review Date:6/13/2010Reviewed By:Linda J. Vorvick, Medical Director, MEDEX Northwest Division of Physician Assistant Studies, University of Washington School of Medicine; and C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Assistant Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, A.D.A.M., Inc.last_img read more

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Nonprofit Branding Done Right Raises More Money

first_imgWhen it comes to updating nonprofit branding, there can seem be more questions than answers. Questions like:Will rebranding increase donations?Will rebranding make it easier for us to convey our organization’s impact and value?Is now the time for us to rebrand?We finally get answers to these million-dollar questions in The Rebrand Effect: How Significant Communications Changes Help Nonprofits Raise More Money (free download here).This eBook from nonprofit communications agency Big Duck is based on the results of a national survey of 350 nonprofit organizations that rebranded within the last 10 years.For the study, Big Duck defines a comprehensive rebrand as developing or changing four or more of these elements:Brand strategyOrganizational nameTaglineLogoKey messagesElevator pitch.A limited rebrand includes three or fewer of these elements.Here are the highlights of this study and what they may mean for your organization:The Good News: Nonprofits that Rebrand Raise More Money.According to the study, most organizations invest in rebranding in hopes of connecting more quickly and firmly with individual donors and prospects. Statistics show those hopes are the reality for many organizations.Fifty percent of organizations surveyed reported revenue growth, with the greatest increase seen in individual giving. This success rate is particularly striking since many participating organizations were in the process or rebranding, or had done so within the last one to two years, so felt it was too early to assess the impact of those changes.Organizations that Comprehensively Rebrand See Greatest ROI.More than half (56%) of the organizations that completed a comprehensive rebrand saw revenue increase, compared to 41% of organizations that implemented limited rebranding.And the impact of comprehensive rebranding exceed revenue gains. The survey found that organizations making more comprehensive changes are likely to see these additional wins:Greater audience participation, from program registration to activism.Improved staff ability and confidence to communicate effectively about the organization, its impact, and value.More media coverage.Several Factors Influence Rebrand Results.The data shows that results stem from more than the rebrand itself. Organizations that rebrand with any or all of these elements already in place are far more likely to get to goal:New, clear organizational focus or strategic plan (within last 12 months)New leadershipStaff and leadership committed to advancing branding and communications changes.In other words, these factors lead to relevant and robust rebrands. If your organization has any or all of these success factors in place, rebranding may well deliver significant value! Dig into the full report from Big Duck to learn more about if, and how, rebranding done right is likely to move the needle for your fundraising efforts.Bonus: Nonprofit branding is important so don’t ignore it. Are you reflecting your brand in all aspects of your giving experience: Events, donation pages, emails, and peer-to-peer campaigns? If not, we can help. Talk to a rep to learn more.last_img read more

New MHTF Topics Page: Post-2015: What’s Next for Maternal Health?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is pleased to announce the launch of our latest topic page: “Post-2014: What’s next for maternal health?” Along with our ongoing guest blog series on the proposed maternal health goal for the post-2015 development agenda, the topics page will compile key findings and debates on the position of maternal health in ongoing global and national discussions of health and development goals and challenges. The page includes resources on progress and lessons learned under the MDG framework, as well as on the position of maternal health in the ongoing process for developing the next global development framework. As with all of our topics pages, the post-2015 topics page will serve as a hub, featuring the latest in research, news and debates. To recommend a resource, please contact us.  If you would like to submit a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on proposed maternal health targets, please email Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

Every Newborn Action Plan Now Available for Comments

first_imgPosted on February 3, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The WHO recently released a draft version of the Every Newborn Action Plan (ENAP) for public comment. The ENAP addresses progress toward improving newborn survival in recent years, along with persistent challenges for accelerating progress. It also notes the opportunities presented by growing global commitments to improve health across the continuum of care for reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. Once finalized, the ENAP will be presented at the upcoming World Health Assembly in May 2014. From the draft: The Every Newborn: an action plan to end preventable deaths is a roadmap for change. It sets out a vision and proposes a goal and targets to end newborn deaths from preventable causes. Five guiding principles and five strategic objectives are at the core of the plan. The action plan is based on evidence and considers the main causes on newborn mortality and effective interventions to prevent and manage these. It builds on the intrinsic links between maternal and newborn health and promotes state-of-the-art knowledge of effective delivery approaches for the interventions and innovations to accelerate progress towards universal health coverage. The plan is also informed by a systematic review of the progress in addressing newborn survival globally in the last decade.The announcement  notes that the ENAP will be linked with “specific plans and targets for maternal health” that are now under development. To join the online consultation on the draft ENAP, submit comments using WHO’s online form by February 28. In addition to the online consultation, a public discussion of the draft will be held on February 12, in Washington, DC. For further details, visit MCHIP’s event announcement.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more