CVPS declares 23-cent per share dividend

first_imgRUTLAND, VT — (Marketwire) — 05/06/09 — On May 5, 2009, the board of directors of Central Vermont Public Service (NYSE: CV) declared a quarterly dividend of 23 cents per share on the issued and outstanding shares of common stock, $6 par value, payable Aug. 14, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business Aug. 4, 2009. The board of directors also declared dividends on the outstanding preferred stock, $100 par value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% dividend series; $1.17 per share on the 4.65% dividend series; $1.19 per share on the 4.75% dividend series; $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% dividend series; and $2.075 per share on the 8.30% dividend series, payable July 1, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business June 19, 2009.CVPS is Vermont’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 159,000 customers statewide. The company’s non-regulated subsidiary, Catamount Resources Corporation, sells and rents electric water heaters through a subsidiary, SmartEnergy Water Heating Services.last_img read more

Nexans hired to deliver Troll umbilicals

first_imgFrench cable manufacturer Nexans has been awarded a contract by Equinor to deliver umbilicals for Troll Phase 3 development located offshore Norway. Earlier on Tuesday, Equinor submitted its plan for further development of the gigantic Troll field on the Norwegian continental shelf  to the Ministry of Petroleum and Energy. The project entails capital expenditures of around NOK 7.8 billion.Equinor also said it would sign contracts for the project within marine installations and subsea facilities worth a total of approximately NOK 750 million with the companies Allseas, Nexans and DeepOcean.The initial development was carried out over two phases, and now Equinor is starting the Phase 3 development to recover the large amount of gas resources in the western part of the field.Separately, Nexans said on Tuesday that its role in the project would be to provide a total of 27 kilometers of complex umbilicals with power, fiber-optic and hydraulic elements for the next development phase of the Troll Phase 3 project.Phase 3 of the Troll project covers the development of the Troll West structure, which lies in water depths of approximately 330 meters and is located 25 kilometers north-west of the Troll A platform. The subsea production systems will comprise two subsea templates or manifolds, as well as nine trees. Each manifold is expected to have four well slots. A total of eight production wells will be drilled and tied-back to the Troll A platform in order to recover the gas reserves. First gas is expected from the project in the second quarter of 2021.For the Troll Phase 3 development Nexans Norway will design, manufacture and supply static umbilicals that include high voltage power elements, high-pressure hydraulic lines, low-pressure hydraulic lines, a MEG (methanol and glycol) service line for chemical injection, a spare line and fiber-optic communications – all within a single cross-section. A 20 kilometer umbilical will link the Troll A platform to Template W1, while a 7 kilometer umbilical will then link Template W1 to Template W2. The contract also includes the supply of connections, terminations and other umbilical accessories.Nexans noted it offered Equinor a total ‘made in Norway’ approach to the contract with the electrical and fiber optic elements manufactured at the Nexans Norway facility in Rognan, North Norway, while the complete umbilical system will be developed, manufactured and tested at Nexans Norway plant in Halden, Norway.Nexans is scheduled to deliver the Troll Phase 3 umbilicals in the first quarter of 2020.last_img read more

Frank Q. Hyde

first_imgFrank Q. Hyde, 94 of Milan passed away Thursday December 28, 2017 at Ripley Crossing at Milan.  Frank was born August 9, 1923 in Gary, Indiana the son of Frank Tolvin and Aletha Anna (Quinn) Hyde.  He was married to Esther (Schwandt) Hyde who preceded him in death.   He was a member of the Osgood Baptist Church. He worked for John Hancock Insurance and later retired as the Manager of the Indianapolis office of Auto Owners Insurance Co.  He had served his country by being in the Merchant Marines during WWII.Frank is survived by son Jeffrey G. (Karen A.)  Hyde of  Milan, grandchildren Heather Block, April McLaughlin, Jonathan and Joseph Hyde, and 6 great grandchildren.Graveside services will be held at Cliff Hill Cemetery at Versailles.  Memorials may be given to the donors choice through the funeral home.  Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements, Box 243 Milan, 47031 Go to www.lawscarrmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.last_img read more

Broyld, Estime in contention for H-back spot despite vast differences in size, skillset

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ GREENSBORO, N.C. — Ashton Broyld stands at 6 feet 4 inches, 221 pounds, while Brisly Estime is listed at 5 feet 9 inches, 176 pounds.Yet, according to Syracuse head coach Scott Shafer, the two can both thrive at H-back. Much like quarterbacks and wide receivers have different fortes, H-backs come in all shapes and sizes, according to Shafer.An H-back typically plays like a tight tend, lining up next to the quarterback, running short passing routes and occasionally running the ball.“The best way to look at it, from the outside in, would be this,” Shafer said. “You have a nickelback on defense but that’s actually a linebacker.“They both play the strong-side linebacker position, but the situation and what you want to do with that person, with that player and his skill sets, dictates what the H-back or nickelback position is.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSo Broyld, who came to Syracuse as a freakishly athletic quarterback, will line up largely as a power back for the Orange. Broyld was one of four true freshmen to play for SU last season. He finished with 171 rushing yards and caught seven passes for a total of 53 yards.Shafer said Broyld brings a unique mix of talents that differ from those of Estime or wide receiver Jarrod West. He said using different kinds of players at the same position is common at quarterback, so he expects it will work at H-back, too.“Everybody does it at quarterback,” Shafer said. “He’s this type of an H-back. Same position, different guy, different skill set.” Comments Published on July 22, 2013 at 8:29 pm Contact Trevor: tbhass@syr.edu | @TrevorHasslast_img read more