The toast, the butter and the technology: DMA 2013

first_imgI’m going to be speaking at the DMA Non Profit Conference next week. If you’re a Washington, DC-area native or are coming into town for the conference, come say hello.The DMA has asked me to share these details on the conference: It’s a great opportunity to gain insights into what other organizations like yours are doing in the fundraising world. Topics will include better ways to integrate your fundraising channels, build donor loyalty and improve your fundraising results. I’ll be speaking about what technology can and can’t do for fundraising. And toast and butter.Technology has enormous potential, but it’s all in how we use it. Technology is at its essence a delivery system. That means what’s being delivered will determine how much good comes of it. Adam Gopnik, a favorite writer of mine, compares technology to toast: “Our thoughts are bigger than the things that deliver them… Toast, as every breakfaster knows, isn’t really about the quality of the bread or how it’s sliced or the toaster. For man cannot live by toast alone. It’s about the butter.” He means the content of our ideas—the butter—is more valuable than the delivery vehicle —the toast of technology— that carries them. I’ll be talking about toast, butter and how to use technology in a way that drives more dollars.More details here.last_img read more

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Nonprofit Spotlight: Firecracker Foundation

first_imgNetwork for Good works with so many amazing nonprofits and we want to introduce you to them and the great work they are doing! Because May is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I want you to meet one of my favorite customers who is doing amazing work helping child sexual abuse survivors heal their whole being.Meet Firecracker Foundation The Firecracker Foundation challenges their supporters to build a blaze, to be a part of the network that keeps and builds the lively sparks in child survivors. From the adult survivors who serve as mentors to the therapists and yoga instructors who offer their time and expertise, Firecracker truly has built a community of healing around the children survivors they serve. That community isn’t just by happenstance; they’ve consciously made recurring giving the heart of their fundraising strategy as a way to ensure the continued success of their communal work. On a larger scale, however, The Firecracker Foundation is about community. Tashmica Torok, the founder of Firecracker, has built her organization around the historical idea of community members being charged with keeping the communal fire burning. From their mission to their fundraising strategy, this ethos of the many coming together for a common goal is extremely evident. We are honored to serve the Firecracker Foundation as their online donation software provider! You guys are amazing! Using Facebook to rally attendance at events is a great way to meet supporters where they already are: Facebook. During their year-end campaign Firecracker Foundation’s Instagram feed kept supporters updated on how close they were to hitting their goal. http://t.co/FKbNzanWBF #ItsTimeToAct #SAAM2015 #LetsEndViolence #SexualAssaultAwarenessMonth— The Firecracker Fdn (@FirecrackerFdn) April 7, 2015 Due to the sensitive nature of their work, it might not be safe to display the photos of those they serve. However, they embrace that challenge and still share images that show the impact of donors’ gifts, without showing clients’ faces. Social media gives organizations the unique opportunity of giving supporters an inside peek into all the work you do. In addition to their work with sexual abuse survivors, Firecracker Foundation also trains advocates. Their Model Stellar Social Media Don’t worry about constantly generating original content, share content that will resonate with your supporters and promote your mission. On a day-to-day basis, The Firecracker Foundation works with survivors of childhood sexual trauma through long-term strategies of therapy, arts enrichment, and yoga practice. Their work is focused on healing the whole individual. Firecracker Foundation takes their emphasis of community involvement and engagement beyond the clients they serve and the advocates they train. They also take that energy to social media. Check out these posts from their social channels: As one of our “Spotlight” nonprofits, we encourage you to take a look at the great work they’re doing and spread the love by following them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.last_img read more

Placing Women at the Center: Rethinking the RMNCH Continuum of Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 22, 2013June 12, 2017By: Ann Starrs, President and Co-Founder, Family Care InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted from the FCI Blog and the PMNCH website.Last week’s Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC), held in Arusha, Tanzania, was both inspiring and sobering. Twenty-five years after the Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched at an international conference held in neighboring Kenya, maternal mortality has finally begun to decline, and there are many and diverse examples of how countries are addressing the challenge of preventing deaths of women and newborns from complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. But as the conference highlighted, huge challenges remain — in improving the quality of care, the conference’s core theme; in strengthening the functionality and capacity of health systems; in addressing major inequities in access to care, within and across countries; and in ensuring that maternal and newborn health receives the political support, increased funding, and public attention that it needs.The majority of the conference’s breakout sessions featured informative and often fascinating presentations on research findings and promising programmatic and technical innovations. One session, however, took a different tack — a debate on “Has the ascendance of the RMNCH continuum of care framework helped or hindered the cause of maternal health?”  I proposed this session to the Maternal Health Task Force, which organized the GMHC, because for me and the organization I head, Family Care International, maternal health has been at the core of our institutional mission since we planned the first Safe Motherhood conference in 1987. For much of the past decade, however, I have been closely involved with the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) and Countdown to 2015, two coalitions that are dedicated to promoting an integrated, comprehensive approach to the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) continuum of care. Have our efforts to define and advance the continuum of care framework contributed to progress in improving maternal health? If so, how much? If not, what can be done about it?These questions were debated by a stellar panel I moderated, which included Wendy Graham, Professor of Obstetric Epidemiology at the University of Aberdeen; Marleen Temmerman, the new head of the Department of Reproductive Health and Research at WHO; Friday Okonofua, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Benin, Nigeria; and Richard Horton, Editor in Chief of The Lancet, as well as a fantastic and diverse audience. To start the discussion I shared the definition of the continuum of care that PMNCH has articulated, based in part on the World Health Report 2005: a constellation of services and interventions for mothers and children from pre-pregnancy/adolescence, through pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal/postpartum period, until children reach the age of five years. This continuum promotes the integration of services across two dimensions: across the lifespan, and across levels of the health system, from households to health facilities. Key packages of interventions within the continuum include sexuality education, family planning, antenatal care, delivery care, postnatal/postpartum care, and the prevention and management of newborn and childhood illnesses.It is, of course, impossible to conduct a randomized control trial on the impact of the RMNCH continuum of care on maternal health, so the discussion was based more on perceptions than on hard evidence. Nevertheless, there are a few data points to consider in debating the question. From an advocacy perspective, panelists generally agreed, the adoption of the continuum of care framework has helped the cause by appealing to multiple constituencies related to women’s and children’s health. Attribution is always a challenge; there are many other developments over the past 5-7 years that have also had an impact, such as the two Women Deliver conferences held in 2007 and 2010 (with the third one taking place in May of this year). But participants generally agreed that linking women’s and children’s health, and defining their needs as an integrated whole, has appealed to policy-makers and politicians on an intuitive and practical level, as demonstrated by the engagement of heads of state, celebrities, private corporations, and other influential figures.Let’s look at the money: during the period 2003-2010 overseas development assistance (ODA) has doubled for MNCH as a whole, according to Countdown to 2015 (Countdown’s analysis did not look at funding for reproductive health, but a new report later in 2013 will incorporate this important element). Maternal and newborn health, which are examined jointly in the analysis, have consistently accounted for one-third of total ODA, with two-thirds going to child health. Given the significant funding that GAVI has mobilized and allocated for immunization over this time period, the fact that maternal and newborn health has maintained its share of total MNCH ODA is noteworthy.And let’s look at how maternal health has fared within the UN Secretary General’s Every Woman Every Child initiative, launched in September 2010: a recent report summarizes each of the commitments made to Every Woman Every Child in the two years since it was launched. Of the 275 commitments included, 147, or 53%, had specific maternal health content. If we look at the commitments according to constituency group, developing country governments had by far the largest percentage of commitments that had specific maternal health content — 84% — compared to 39% for non-governmental organizations, 24% for donors, and 52% for multilateral agencies and coalitions. Clearly, maternal health has not been marginalized within the continuum from a broad policy, program and funding perspective, despite the fear some had expressed that it would be pushed aside in favor of child health interventions that are perceived as easier and less costly to implement.Another benefit of the continuum of care framework, as noted by Dr. Okonofua, has been increased collaboration among the communities that represent its different elements. While there were tensions and rivalries when PMNCH and Countdown were first established, especially between the maternal and child health communities, today groups working on advocacy, policy, program implementation, service delivery, and research within the continuum generally work together more frequently, cordially and effectively than they did before, especially at the global level. PMNCH and Countdown, as well as Every Woman Every Child, have brought together key players to define unified messages and strategies that have achieved widespread acceptance.That was the good news; but panelists and participants at the session also saw a number of problems with the continuum of care concept. The concern articulated by Richard Horton, and echoed by many of the session participants, was that the continuum views women and adolescents primarily as mothers or future mothers. This narrow view contributes to a range of gaps and challenges; it means crucial cultural, social and economic determinants of health and survival, including female education and empowerment, are not given adequate weight. Gender-based violence deserves much more attention, both for its own sake and for its impact on maternal, newborn and child health. Politically sensitive or controversial elements of the continuum, especially abortion but also, in some cases, family planning and services for adolescents, may be neglected in policy, programming, and resource allocation.The fragmentation inherent in the continuum of care also contributes to what Wendy Graham called the compartmentalization of women. As Countdown’s analysis of coverage has demonstrated, the continuum of care doesn’t guarantee continuity of care; coverage rates are much higher for interventions like antenatal care and child immunization than for delivery or postnatal/postpartum care. Women’s needs for a range of interventions and services, available in a single health facility on any day of the week, are not being met in many countries.Other concerns that emerged during the discussion were that the RMNCH continuum of care framework does not explicitly or adequately reflect the importance of quality of care, which in turn depends on a range of factors: skilled, compassionate health care workers, functional facilities, adequate supplies and equipment, and an effective health information system that tracks not just whether interventions are being provided, but also whether individual women and their families are receiving the care they need throughout their lives.Dr. Okonofua, in his comments, focused on how the continuum of care concept has been implemented, or hasn’t, in countries. The implications of the continuum of care for on-the-ground program implementation have not been fully articulated and communicated; more effort, he noted, needs to be invested in making the concept relevant and useful for policy-makers, program managers, and service providers.Despite these gaps, however, participants in the session – and the panelists themselves – agreed that the continuum of care is a valid and valuable concept, and that the inadequacies identified should be addressed. “Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater,” said one member of the audience. The continuum of care, as a concept, has already evolved; initially, for example, it did not fully integrate reproductive health elements. As Marleen Temmerman commented, the continuum of care concept is a tool; what is important is what is done with it.As 2015 approaches, the global health community is struggling to articulate a health goal for the post-2015 development framework that will resonate widely and guide accelerated, strategic action to prevent avoidable deaths and improve health of people around the world. The RMNCH community — or communities — needs a framework that more fully reflects the realities and complexities of the lives of women and children, and that enables us to reach out to other health and non-health communities, including HIV/AIDS, NCDs, and women’s rights and empowerment, for a common cause. To do this, we need to revise the continuum of care framework to maximize its relevance and utility for countries, and to incorporate the following missing elements:Recognition of the importance of quality of careResponsiveness to the needs of girls and women throughout the life cycle, not just in relation to pregnancy and childbirthLinks to the cultural, social and economic determinants of women’s and children’s healthRichard Horton’s call for a manifesto to emerge from the GMHC included 10 key points; redefining the RMNCH continuum of care was one of them, inspired by the panel. The challenge has been issued; it is now up to us to meet that challenge.Share this:last_img read more

Code of Conduct for Research in Low-income Countries

first_imgI was fortunate to attend the plenary discussion in Arusha. Richard Horton provided a provocative performance as Chair, and the panelists were excellent in their responses.However, little mention was given to WHO’s WHO’s role and responsibilities in health research: Draft WHO strategy on research for health. That document states, “all the goals concern all Member States and all individuals, communities, institutions and organizations involved in the production and/or use of research, including WHO.”Paragraph 25 discusses the issue of standards:No country is self-sufficient in its research capacity, so Member States need to be able to share research outputs. Effective and equitable sharing requires internationally agreed norms and standards for research; with this in mind, the standards goal concerns the promotion of good practice in research by means of work to establish agreements on good practices, scientific benchmarks, ethical guidelines and accountability mechanisms. The achievement of this goal is essential for winning public support and confidence.The principles from Arusha are sound, and the debate will no doubt continue. But live, Q&A sessions in plenary will not always allow for panelists to critically think through the implications of their intuitive responses. Caution is needed, with consideration of the inadvertent effects that may arise.Several examples in relation to the points proposed:A PhD researcher (from the global north), applying for ethics approval at their host University for their independent, original research is immediately in breach of the first point.  Is it feasible that Harvard, Yale, Oxford, Cambridge, the LSE etc., etc. would change their academic standards of research to insist that all research in LMICs is a joint endeavor – unless you happen to be from the global south?The World Bank/IBRD is a funder of research (often at the country’s expense) but would they shift to this principle on all their publications? Including those that inform their financing decisions with a country? They are after all, a Bank.It is not just “medical” journals that need to heed the call. Aspirations for effective coverage and quality of care for all (i.e. Universal Health Coverage) require many types of health workers. Public health, midwifery, nursing, management, pharmacy and other journals should all be included.More reflection is needed, and perhaps the WHO is best placed to steer a future code. In the meantime, we should all continue to encourage “health” journals to ensure that health information is available for all.For more information on Integrare’s presentations on the High Burden Countries Initiative in Arusha please click here.To learn more about the H4+ High Burden Countries Initiative, click here and follow ICS Integrare on Twitter. Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 6, 2013March 21, 2017By: Jim Campbell, Director, Instituto de Cooperacion Social Integrare based in Barcelona, SpainClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania had many highlights, including the closing plenary presentation from Dr. Mahmoud Fathalla ( watch the presentation here and see Karen Beattie’s blog), and the GMHC2013 manifesto proposed by Richard Horton (see Ann Starrs’ blog for more).A recent article in The Lancet also reports on the plenary discussions on a proposed new Code of Conduct for health research in low-income countries. Lancet Editor Richard Horton  reports:The meeting in Arusha was opened by Agnes Binagwaho, Rwanda’s Minister of Health. She argued passionately that research and ethics must be more closely bound together. She spoke about the theft of data from Africa and the new enslavement of Africans. She called for a Code of Conduct for research in low-income countries.Here is a draft of a Code – a set of principles – assembled from a debate between Agnes Binagwaho, Wendy Graham, Rafael Lozano, and Marleen Temmerman: No ethics committee, funder of research, or medical journal should approve, support, or publish research about a low-income country without joint authorship from that country.In any research project in a low-income setting, local scientists must be included as co-principal investigators.Before starting research in a low-income country, western authors and institutions must define a clear plan for how they will transfer research skills back to that country. Medical journals and their publishers must ensure that all global health research is free at the point of use in countries.Western journals must facilitate language translation of research, either themselves or by enabling local journals to republish freely.last_img read more

4 Lessons from the Trenches to Prepare for Giving Season

first_imgHere at Network for Good, we’re continuously innovating our platform. The best way we do this is by immersing ourselves in the lives of our nonprofit users to understand the everyday problems they are trying to solve.Last week, during a quarterly business review meeting in Baltimore, our team was challenged to meet with local nonprofits to help them drive awareness and increase funds. Below are the cliff notes from the day:The ChallengeWe arrived in Baltimore at 9AM on Wednesday, July 19. We broke into five teams and were given a task: find a nonprofit and help them fundraise leveraging the “Jobs to be Done” philosophy around functional, social, and emotional drivers. The team that raises the most, wins.The results: $7,360. In a single day.That’s $7,360 that went to five local nonprofits: Wide Angle Youth Media, Holistic Life Foundation, Playworks Maryland, Women’s Housing Coalition, and University of Maryland Baltimore.As we got to know these five nonprofits and the people who lead them, four lessons stood out. We thought we would share them in a new Blog Series to help you prepare for giving season.Here’s what we learned:1. Giving is an emotional act.We quickly learned the real-life value of emotionally driven appeals. Most of the donations we collected were from people who had an emotional connection to us. We had greater luck raising funds from text messages to our personal network than asking for donation on the streets – although we did both! This builds the case for the power behind peer-to-peer fundraising.2. Not all nonprofits are created equal, but they all face time and capacity challenges.Each nonprofit we helped had their own set of challenges to overcome. Some had more limited resources than others. Some had a lot of pressure on them to fundraise in order to serve their clients, while others needed more strategic help.  But what they all had in common was time and capacity challenges and the need for systems that would solve this problem.3. All of them wonder, “Are we doing enough?”All of the nonprofits we worked with that day shared concerns about their funding and sustainability. They wondered if they were doing enough to diversity their funding strategy. Creating a sustainable individual giving program and having the right mix of individual giving and additional funding sources are continual concerns.4. There’s nothing like the power of a team.When we set out to raise as much as we could in just one day, we quickly learned that we were all motivated to win the challenge because we all knew what we were working towards. We saw this at the nonprofits too, and believe those with a strong strategy were able to rally their troops and others around their cause more easily.Check back next week as we dive into the first lesson, on how you can leverage the emotional connection when developing your appeals this giving season.last_img read more

Use Our New Organizations Search!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on May 14, 2015August 8, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)We are excited to present a new feature on the MHTF website: the organizations search.We have created a database of maternal health organizations to help foster connections and build partnerships between groups working on similar issues. There are many diverse organizations around the world working on maternal health, and this new tool will help you connect with them!The organizations database grew out of the maternal health mapping project, part of phase 1 of the MHTF. As more and more organizations added themselves to the map, it became difficult to find anyone! The new search-based interface enables easy access to the information.We want to hear from you! Test out the new organizations search feature and let us know what you think. If your organization is not included in the search, but you would like it to be, please fill out the information form. We would be happy to add you!Share this:last_img read more

WHO Misoprostol Approval Means Lifesaving Treatment for Women in Low-resource Settings

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 16, 2015June 12, 2017By: Lindsay Grenier, Maternal Health Technical Advisor, MCSP ; Susan Moffson, MCSP Senior Program OfficerClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post has been slightly edited from it’s original posting on the blog of the Maternal and Child Survival Program.A young woman arrived at a health clinic in Sierra Leone with heavy bleeding. She was suffering from postpartum hemorrhage (PPH)—or excessive bleeding after birth—the most common cause of death for women after delivery.The midwife at the clinic acted quickly, administering oxytocin, a uterotonic that helps the uterus contract to stop the bleeding. However, the facility was lacking the refrigeration needed to properly store the drug, which was also two years out of date. As a result, the oxytocin had no effect, and the woman died two hours later.Mother and newborn in Allahabad, India. (Kate Holt/MCHIP)Tragically, poor and marginalized populations suffering from a disproportionate burden of disease often have the least access to high-quality health services. This is especially true of women during childbirth, who often deliver at home instead of health facilities. Those women who do make it to a facility may find them ill-equipped, lacking skilled personnel and essential medicines. Or, as in the case of the young woman from Sierra Leone, the medicines may be expired and improperly stored, thereby greatly diminishing their effectiveness.Alarmingly, all of these women will be at risk of dying from PPH without access to uterotonics. And while oxytocin is the gold standard for preventing and treating PPH, it is not always available or kept sufficiently cool. It must also be given through injection by a skilled birth attendant, such as a doctor or nurse.Thankfully, there is a second-line uterotonic drug that can be used to prevent and treat PPH when oxytocin is not available: misoprostol. The World Health Organization (WHO) recently added misoprostol — which does not require refrigeration and can be taken as a pill — to the Essential Medicines List for treatment of PPH in every country. This action expands the range of options to treat PPH, empowering health care workers with one more tool in their arsenal to fight bleeding after birth.As professionals who work every day around the world to ensure our interventions reach the most vulnerable populations, and understand the endorsement of misoprostol means more equitable access to and appropriate use of uteronics for countless women across the developing world.The WHO announcement opens an exciting new chapter in global health. While much work remains before every facility can guarantee a stable stock of viable oxytocin, the endorsement of misoprostol for the treatment of PPH will increase the availability of lifesaving care for some of the world’s most vulnerable women.As part of our own comprehensive PPH strategy, MCSP continues to strengthen essential health system functions, with the goal of overcoming local system barriers to provision of high-quality care, effective referral systems, and trained providers.Share this:last_img read more

Diabetics Warned to Reduce Risk of Eye Disease

first_img Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals. Story Highlights Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults. Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease. Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults.Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease.“If diabetics can control their blood sugar and their blood pressure, there’s a good chance that their eyes or their vision will not worsen. You are more likely to get eye disease if your blood sugar is out of control,” she pointed out.Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals.The study looked at the incidence of DR; the knowledge, beliefs and practices of diabetic patients; and the severity of visual problems among diabetics.One recommendation from the local study is for an annual dilated eye examination for all diabetic patients. Dr. Mowatt said that this should be standard practice, although that has not been the case in Jamaica. She noted that there is a significant presence of DR cases in the country.One key finding from the study, she said, was that male patients were more likely to have poor blood sugar and blood pressure control, resulting in more severe visual loss.Dr. Mowatt stressed that it is important for diabetics to be screened for DR as soon as they are diagnosed, so that medical care providers can pick up any disease process and start treatment early.She cited a major study in the United Kingdom that looked at over 500 Type Two diabetic patients and found that 39 per cent of them had eye disease at the time of diagnosis. “This means that when many people are diagnosed with diabetes they already had eye disease,” she noted.“DR is one of the leading causes of blindness in the young population, and it is not a disease of the elderly. It is a disease of the working-class people in their thirties, forties and fifties, and it is preventable,” she reiterated.Dr. Mowatt said that diabetics also need to be more vigilant about comorbidity, which is the presence of other chronic diseases.“We looked at blood sugar control (of diabetics) and it was significant that almost 87 per cent of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension where the blood pressure was greater than 130/80, which is the ideal blood pressure for a diabetic,” she pointed out. The research findings were presented at the seventh staging National Health Research Conference in 2016.last_img read more

Paul Simon Tour Reaches Halfway Point In Support Of HalfEarth Project

first_imgGrammy-winning singer-songwriter Paul Simon has reached the midpoint in his month-long tour to raise awareness of the importance of protecting the planet’s biodiversity.Last month, Simon plugged the tour on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert. Simon is inspiring audiences across the U.S. with new and beloved songs, and donating tour proceeds to the Half-Earth Project, an initiative of the E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation.Simon first met E.O. Wilson at TED over a decade ago. In 2016, Simon reviewed Wilson’s book, Half-Earth: Our Planet’s Fight For Life, for The New York Times, saying, “Half-Earth is compulsory reading if we care about the lives of our children, our children’s children and all of the species alive today.”Simon has talked about Half-Earth at each of his shows, often donning a Half-Earth cap. According to the CincyMusic website: “Throughout the show, a baseball cap with a small ‘e’ rested on his mic stand. Simon returned for Encore No. 2 with it atop his head for the first time. He explained, ‘This cap that I’m wearing…it represents an organization called Half-Earth that was started by a scientist, E.O. Wilson… his book, Half-Earth – which I recommend to anyone who is interested in ecology and the planet and saving what we’ve got – had a great effect on me.’”Wilson said of the tour: “I am delighted that Paul Simon is helping raise awareness of Half-Earth. Paul believes strongly in our work to save the planet’s biodiversity.”“Species are the basic units of biodiversity, yet we are driving them to extinction up to 1,000 times faster than before the coming of humanity,” said Wilson. “If we do not move quickly to reverse our negative effects on the rest of life, its diversity will be diminished drastically to our loss and even endangerment.”Remaining concert cities include: Billings, Missoula, Spokane, Bend, Lake Tahoe, Denver and Milwaukee.The E.O. Wilson Biodiversity Foundation fosters stewardship of our world through biodiversity research and education initiatives that promote and inform worldwide preservation of our biological heritage. The Half-Earth Project has science at its core and our moral obligation to the rest of life at its heart. To learn more about Half-Earth, visit www.half-earthproject.org.last_img read more

Ohio State field hockey set for Big Ten tournament quarterfinal vs Northwestern

OSU sophomore forward Maddy Humphrey (23) during a game against California on Oct. 25 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 6-3. Credit: Robert Scarpinito | Copy ChiefOhio State field hockey is set to face fourth-seeded and No. 17 Northwestern in the opening game of the Big Ten Tournament, where the winner will move on to compete against top-seeded Maryland or eighth-seeded Michigan State.Northwestern (12-7, 4-4) and OSU last met less than a month ago when they squared off at Buckeye Varsity Field in a game in which the Wildcats scored once in each half. Those two goals were enough to defeat OSU in shutout fashion, 2-0. OSU hopes to increase offensive pressure this time around, coach Anne Wilkinson said.“We can’t give up the amount of shots we’ve given up in the past,” Wilkinson said. “We haven’t generated enough attacks and been able to sustain them so we need to take more shots and challenge more of these goalkeepers.”Sophomore forward Morgan Kile said one of the main components going into the tournament is putting all of the pieces together one last time. “I think the key thing for our team going into the tournament is to put all the skills and things we’ve worked on throughout the season together,” Kile said. “We need to really show Northwestern what we can do out there.”The Buckeyes will enter the tournament with three players being awarded All-Big Ten honors. Senior co-captains Peanut Johnson and Emma Royce, along with sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey, were bestowed the awards after their efforts this season. Johnson, Humphrey, Royce and Kile have all registered double-digit points, with Johnson and Humphrey being the fourth-highest scoring duo in the Big Ten this year with 53 total points. This year will be the Buckeyes’ 20th all-time appearance in the Big Ten tournament. Thrice they have taken home the Big Ten title. In 2001 and 2010, OSU was a co-champion, while it captured the outright crown in 2006. The last time OSU and Northwestern squared off against each other in the tournament was in 2013. In that game, Johnson registered a goal and an assist, pushing the Buckeyes to a 3-2 victory against the then-No. 13 Wildcats.In order to post another win this time around, Wilkinson said teamwork will be critical.“The most important thing is we have to play together,” Wilkinson said. “Sometimes they take too much on themselves and put too much weight on their individual ability. We just need to rely on each other and play as a team, and the results will take care of themselves. We have to work hard, which they have.”OSU and Northwestern are set face off at 10 a.m. on Thursday in Bloomington, Indiana. Defensive gainsOSU has given up 18 fewer goals this year — 56 last season compared to 38 in 2015 — as well as allowing 21 fewer shots (280 in 2014, 259 in 2015) and 10 fewer penalty corners (124 in 2014, 114 in 2015). Sophomore goalie Liz Tamburro finished the season with 124 total saves. She ranks second in the conference with 6.88 saves per game.Game results when OSU…Scores first: 7-0Leads at the half: 5-0Trails at the half: 2-9Is tied at the half: 2-0Outshoots its opponent: 4-3Is outshot: 5-6Is in a one-goal game: 4-2Is in a two-goal game: 5-7Heads to overtime: 1-1 read more

Five takeaways from Bowling Green Samuel shines defense stands tall

The Ohio State football team prepares to run onto the field prior to the first game of the 2016 season against Bowling Green on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAfter a 77-10 rout of the Bowling Green Falcons on Saturday, the Ohio State football team appears to be ready for the challenges ahead in 2016. Here are five takeaways from the game.Samuel the workhorse for OSUEarlier in the spring, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer named junior H-back Curtis Samuel as his No. 1 playmaker. Known for his speed and agility, Buckeye fans got a glimpse Saturday as to why Meyer had faith in Samuel. Touching the ball 22 times, the junior picked up 261 all-purpose yards and three total touchdowns. Although the day was a chance to see how redshirt sophomore Noah Brown and redshirt senior Corey Smith would perform at wide receiver after season-ending injuries last season, Samuel was the leading pass catcher on Saturday.Redshirt freshman Mike Weber was the leading rusher on the day, receiving 19 carries. Samuel was the second leading rusher on the day, handling the ball on the ground 13 times. Weber will be facing stiff competition with Samuel playing at such a high level.“It’s a great feeling to be one of the first people out there to touch the ball. I have to keep my mind right,” Samuel said. “I just want to ball out and make opportunities for my team.”One thing is certain after OSU faced Bowling Green; Samuel really is a playmaker. The Silver Bullets are fast and have depthRedshirt junior defensive tackle Tracy Sprinkle sustained what appeared to be a serious right knee injury in the first quarter. OSU fans’ worst fears were confirmed by Meyer at the press conference following the game, as it was announced that the early indication is a patellar tendon injury, most likely requiring surgery. “Tracy’s been my roommate since we first got here. Me and Tracy, we were real close during recruiting,” junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said. “I love Tracy to death. That’s my brother. When he went down, it was the worst thing. He’s family to me.”Although the loss of Sprinkle might hurt in the long run, the Buckeyes regrouped quickly and had little drop off without their primary defensive tackle on the field. Much of the reason for the success can be credited to the depth Meyer and the rest of the OSU coaching staff has talked about all spring.As for the speed of the defense, the ability of Buckeye defenders to chase down ball carriers and undercut routes to prevent receptions was showcased throughout all four characters. On two occasions, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker used his speed to track down the ball and come up with an interception.“Greg Schiano, who has coached at the highest level in football in the pros, and his comments to me about the things Malik can do,” Meyer said. “He can do whatever he trains to do.”Holes filled up quickly by linebackers and secondary defenders, preventing long carries by Bowling Green. Although a few players showcased potential weakness in coverage and pass rushing, the speed of OSU’s defense quickly made up for the miscues. The Buckeyes’ coaching staff definitely were right in saying this team is faster than last year’s. The secondary can depend on more than Gareon ConleyAlthough the only returning starter for the OSU secondary was redshirt junior Gareon Conley, the Buckeyes looked sharp throughout the afternoon. Bowling Green struggled to create any offense through the air, and Hooker came up with two big interceptions. True freshman cornerback Rodjay Burns took full advantage of his time on the field, picking off Bowling Green backup quarterback James Morgan and returning the ball 75 yards for a touchdown. The Buckeyes surrendered just 175 yards through the air.“We have a lot of talent,” junior cornerback Damon Webb said. “We’re just trying to get guys as much experience as we can and get guys on the field because we have a lot of talent, and we want to show it.”The longest pass the Falcons could muster all day was 17 yards, a testament to the swarming secondary play OSU enjoyed. They may not have the likes of Eli Apple, Tyvis Powell or Vonn Bell. But the Scarlet and Gray may just have a dominant group of cornerbacks and safeties for 2016. J.T. Barrett has maturedWhen redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett first appeared for the Buckeyes in 2014 to replace the injured Braxton Miller, Barrett helped lead the team to the College Football Playoff. Although the offense succeeded under the then-freshman, the workload of former running back Ezekiel Elliott was thought to have carried the team through most of the season. Barrett was considered immature as a player and needed time to develop. The game against Bowling Green Saturday is a testament to just how far he has come as a player. Misreading a route early in the first quarter, Barrett gave up a pick-six to Falcons linebacker Brandon Harris.“Throwing an interception for a touchdown we don’t like that,” Meyer said. “But rebound, let’s go, and he went right back and said that’s on me.”Barrett went on to complete 21 passes on 31 attempts and toss six touchdowns on 349 yards, adding another score on the ground. The seven touchdowns he was responsible for set a new record for OSU. All of this was accomplished with more than six minutes left in the third quarter.After finishing fifth in Heisman voting in 2014, Barrett makes for a compelling player who just may find himself on voters ballots this year if he can continue with this kind of production. Mike Weber has the potential to succeed at OSUAfter the recruiting saga that went with Weber, the debut of the Detroit native was delayed after a meniscus tear in his knee resulted in a redshirt season in his freshman campaign. In the spring of 2016, Weber had many expectations to meet from his coaches, and that’s exactly what he did.OSU running backs coach Tony Alford called Weber’s parents on Wednesday to share the news that their son was going to be the starting running back for the Scarlet and Gray.In his first game as a Buckeye, Weber rushed for 136 yards on 19 carries. Although he failed to score, Weber showcased a punishing running style, especially on his first carry. After being tripped a few yards from the line of scrimmage, Weber barreled into the defender in front of him, flattening the would-be tackler. The crowd erupted in cheers.Meyer spoke highly of his tailback, but extended the challenge to Weber of running a bit more like departed Ezekiel Elliott. Lofty standards for a guy appearing in his first game, but a good showing for the redshirt freshman nonetheless. read more

FA Cup not enough to save Chelseas nightmare season – Azpilicueta

first_imgCesar Azpilicueta has recently admitted that even if Chelsea were indeed to win the FA Cup this season, this would not make up for their terrible performance throughout the whole season.The Blues’ defender was the one to net the single goal for his team on Sunday, when they were facing West Ham. This has put Chelsea ten points off the top four in the Premier League and is their fifth win in their last 20 games.“The FA Cup is a massive trophy with a lot of history but it’s not enough for us,” Azpilicueta claimed, according to the Mirror.Jose Mourinho is sold on Lampard succeeding at Chelsea Tomás Pavel Ibarra Meda – September 14, 2019 Jose Mourinho wanted to give his two cents on Frank Lampard’s odds as the new Chelsea FC manager, he thinks he will succeed.There really…“We will try to win it but the cup will not save our season.”“To get a draw at home in another London derby is really frustrating for all of us and all of the fans. We are not happy,” he added, addressing the game against West Ham.“What matters is the score at the end, I am frustrated today, we should be able to win this game.”last_img read more

Fabianski West Ham eyeing an upset against Spurs

first_imgWest Ham goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski is hopeful of victory ahead of their London derby with Tottenham on SaturdayAfter enduring a torrid start to the new season, West Ham goes into this weekend’s showdown at the London Stadium with three wins in their last five matches.This includes impressive 3-1 victories over Everton and Manchester United.Now Fabianski hopes that West Ham can cause another upset against their heavily fancied London neighbours Spurs.“It’s another important one, another big one against a tough opponent, but we are playing at home so hopefully with all the hard work during the week we’ll be in good form for Saturday’s game,” Fabianski told the club website.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I’m looking forward to the atmosphere on Saturday. I’ve always enjoyed playing against Spurs – it has a nice atmosphere to it so I’m guessing it won’t be any different.“We just have to prepare ourselves well during the week and have a good game on Saturday, and make sure that the fans will be proud and happy after our performance.“You can see that we have improved, especially playing at home and the recent results here have been very good so hopefully that will continue this Saturday.”West Ham are 15th in the Premier League table with seven points from eight games.last_img read more

Wes Morgan declared fit for Newport game

first_imgLeicester City manager Claude Puel has confirmed that defender Wes Morgan has recovered from illness in time to face Newport County in the third round of the FA Cup.Morgan was sidelined for Leicester’s last two games against Cardiff City and Everton, but Puel has confirmed he’s now available for selection when they visit Newport County on Saturday.“Wes came back in training this week with good fitness and he’s available for the game,” the Frenchman told the national media on Friday afternoon,” Puel told the club’s website.“We will see. I don’t want to give all the players who are available for this game! It will be a good team, 18 strong players, with some rotation.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“The players have played a lot [over the festive period] and it’s important to maintain freshness in the team.“We have a squad with players who are close and we need to use all the possibilities of the squad to maintain a good freshness and to compete at a high level in our games.“It’s important to find a good balance between quality, freshness and to maintain this level.”last_img read more

Marcus Rashford reaches 100 Premier League games

first_imgAfter his crucial performance against Leicester City last Sunday, Marcus Rashford reached 100 Premier League games at only 21 years of age.Manchester United has Marcus Rashford as one of the most exciting young talents who is doing everything to be part of the best players in the world, the lad has already played his 100th Premier League match and his stats are simply incredible.A report from Diario AS suggests that Real Madrid is eager to sign the English striker next summer but there is a fat chance that the Red Devils will let him go, Rashford is considered one of the cornerstones of the club’s project for the future.Since he started an impressive career in the domestic competition, Marcus has already scored 26 goals and provided 15 assists to his teammates.His numbers in all competitions go even further than that, with 42 goals and 26 assists since Dutch manager Louis van Gaal gave him the opportunity to play his very first minutes for the squad.The most recent performances are the reason several clubs have shown interest in signing Marcus Rashford, but the club is already looking to improve his contract and there was a reason the club decided to give him the number ’10’ jersey at such an early age.Marcus Rashford’s overall Premier League record (this season in brackets):100 Apps (22)26 Goals (9)15 Assists (7)#MUFC #MUFC pic.twitter.com/GkcNCuzT0D— RedReveal (@RedReveal) February 4, 2019The type of footballer that Marcus Rashford has become invites us to think about the attacking force that the England National Team will have this year, as they will line him up alongside the likes of skipper Harry Kane, and young sensation Jadon Sancho with Raheem Sterling on both flanks.Manager Gareth Southgate has already been following the latest performances from Rashford and his plans completely involve him on the starting XI, he is the type of player who can decide a very complicated match such as the upcoming UEFA Nations League that is coming against the Netherlands in June.Rashford has all the qualities of a forward who can play in all attacking positions on the pitch, he can’t be limited to a certain spot because that will prevent him from showcasing his abilities to their full extent.His time at Manchester United has given us a better idea of the player he is slowly becoming, Rashford’s connection with Paul Pogba has also helped him immensely as he has transformed into a more regular decisive player since manager Jose Mourinho left the squad.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.Youngest players to reach 100 PL appearances for Manchester United 🏴󠁧󠁢󠁷󠁬󠁳󠁿 Ryan Giggs (21y, 74d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Marcus Rashford (21y, 95d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Wayne Rooney (21y, 201d)🇵🇹 Cristiano Ronaldo (21y, 224d)🏴󠁧󠁢󠁥󠁮󠁧󠁿 Phil Neville (22y, 108d)— Football Factly (@FootballFactly) February 3, 2019Rashford is also the latest of a long list of historic players who made their debut under manager Louis van Gaal, he has everything to be considered amongst a very prestigious list of players who have been very successful such as Xavi Hernandez, Carles Puyol, Andres Iniesta, Toni Kroos, Patrick Kluivert, Bastian Schweinsteiger, among others.Rashford has the potential of becoming one of the most complete offensive players that the Dutch manager ever had the honour of helping with their debut as professionals, it appears that he will get very far with Manchester United or any other club where he decides to play if he ever chooses to do it.Just to put things under perspective, let’s look at other great players at the same age of Rashford.The England international reached 100 matches at 21 years and 95 days old, legendary Ryan Giggs accomplished the same milestone at 21 years and 74 years of age.Cristiano Ronaldo had only scored 19 goals and provided 16 assists at the same age.Wayne Rooney is the player who comes closest to Rashford’s numbers, as the English legend scored 24 goals on his first 100 Premier League appearances.Rashford vs Ronaldo after 100 PL games… 👀 pic.twitter.com/B7Yo5DqZOb— TheFootballRepublic (@TheFootballRep) February 4, 2019How many goals will Marcus Rashford score throughout his Premier League career? Please share your opinion in the comment section down below.last_img read more

Public Hearings for Police Chief David Nisleit

first_img February 12, 2018 Ed Lenderman, Live at City Hall previewing hearing on selection for new Police Chief pic.twitter.com/tPr7XmVUWJ— Ed Lenderman (@EdLendermanKUSI) February 12, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 12, 2018 Ed Lenderman Updated: 10:49 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsThe public hearings are scheduled for Feb. 12 at 1 p.m.Residents will be able to offer feedback on the appointment of David Nisleit as the city’s next top cop during two City Council meetings later this month, council President Myrtle Cole announced Friday.Mayor Kevin Faulconer on Thursday named Nisleit, a current assistant San Diego police chief, as the successor to Chief Shelley Zimmerman following a nationwide search.Nisleit’s appointment must be confirmed by a majority council vote.feb. 26 at 2 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 202 C St. However, on Friday Faulconer sent Cole a memo requesting the Feb. 12 meeting be moved to 6 p.m. On Twitter, the mayor’s office said he asked for the change “so more San Diegans can attend and have their voices heard.”The council will take a vote on the matter on Feb. 26. KUSI’s Ed Lenderman has the details. Public Hearings for Police Chief David Nisleitlast_img read more

Two Arrested In Connection With Burglary At Kenai Central High School

first_imgLangham: “The total value of the stolen property by Brower and Gordon was greater than $750 and less than $25,000.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Police Department have arrested two individuals in connection with a break in and burglary at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop that occured on December 20. As part of the ongoing investigation into the burglary, Byron G. Gordon, age 40, of Kenai was arrested for Burglary 2nd Degree and Theft 2nd Degree. Also arrested was Kevin W. Brower, age 51, of Kenai. KPD Luitenent Ben Langham: “Byron Gordon entered and remained at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop interior building fenced in area and property while commiting the crime of theft in the 2nd degree. Kevin Brower arrived shortly after shortly after in his vehicle and collected Byron Gordon along with a stolen welder, power tools, and other stolen property.” Brower was arrested on January 22 in connection with a burglary at the Kenai Wash and Dry according to Langham he was released and then a warrant was served for his and Gordons arrest in connection with the burglary at Kenai Central High School. Brower told investigators that he returned days later on his own, and took another welder from the school. According to Langham, Brower was found in possession of the second stolen welder during a consent search by KPD. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp3VmJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

Symptoms of 74like famine in sight BNP

first_imgRuhul Kabir RizviThe Awami League government has created a situation of lawlessness by plundering public resources, especially looting money from banks, insurance companies and the share market, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party has alleged.BNP senior joint secretary general Ruhul Kabir Rizvi has said the activists and beneficiaries of the ‘mandateless government’ are ruining the financial sector and the country as a whole.The BNP leader, during a briefing on Sunday, pointed out that the economy is in the doldrums and the people are suffering for the price-hike of essentials added to the lack of economic opportunities in society.”Reports say many people are living, banking on personal loans… Symptoms of the famine of 1974 are being visible,” Rizvi told newsmen at the party’s Naya Paltan central office.Referring to the recent scams in the private commercial banks, he observed that corruption and anarchy in the banking sector have turned epidemic.He listed the names of state-owned Sonali, Rupali, Agrani and Janata banks, and also specialised Krishi Bank, and NRB Commercial Bank and Farmers Bank that are plagued by fraudulent practices.”Those of the mandateless government have grabbed 56 out of 57 banks… Due to massive looting in the banking sector the commoners as clients are living in panic (about their deposits),” the BNP leader said. “However, the government’s ministers are now buying homes abroad.”On takeover of Islami Bank Bangladesh Limited earlier this year, he regretted that the foreign shareholders of the banks were withdrawing from the bank due to such unwarranted interference in the activities of the financial institution. “Most recently, the Social Islami Bank Limited has also been occupied by the Awami League’s people,” he said.Rizvi blasted the finance minister, AMA Muhith, for failure to publish the probe report on US$81 million cyber heist of the Bangladesh Bank.The BNP leader also criticised Muhith for downplaying the figures of poverty-ridden people in the country.Rizvi alleged that the moment the absolute number of poor is increasing, the AL’s men and their families are in a competition to grab public resources.”Looting, tender manipulation, extortion and politicisation are all affecting the entire society. As a result, law and order has broken down across the country,” he said.”There is no sector in the country where the ruling party men did not try to make money from,” he added.The BNP leader also dwelt on the rising unemployment, stagnation in investment and slowdown in remittances inflow.”If the situation continues, a catastrophe is likely and the people would be compelled to lead the life of animals,” he said.The BNP joint secretary general expressed his conviction that the nation would not get rid of the situation, until the fall of the ‘government without mandate’.last_img read more

Cards Earn High Marks in the Classroom

first_imgStory Links The academic success continues strong tradition, marking the 16th consecutive semester with a team GPA of 3.0 or higher. The 3.517 team total is the highest in head coach Justine Sowry’s eight-year tenure. Louisville recently achieved a perfect mark in the NCAA’s Graduation Success Rate (GSR) report released in November 2018. Since joining the ACC, 16 UofL field hockey players have been named to the ACC All-Academic Squads.About LouisvilleThe Cardinals finished the 2018 season with a 13-6 overall record and ranked No. 14 in the National Field Hockey Coaches Association (NFHCA) poll after earning the No. 3 seed in the 2018 ACC Championship. Three players, Ayeisha McFerran, Mercedes Pastor and Taylor Stone earned NFHCA All-America honors while Alli Bitting, Bethany Russ and Carter Ayars joined them on the NFHCA All-West Region Teams.Fans can follow Louisville Field Hockey on Twitter (@ULFieldHockey) at  https://twitter.com/ULFieldHockey and on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/ULFieldHockey Print Friendly Version In addition to the squad’s combined academic mark, 17 student-athletes achieved a GPA at least 3.25 while 22 players finished the fall semester at 3.0 or better.center_img The University of Louisville field hockey team completed a successful fall semester in the classroom, posting a 3.517 team grade-point average.last_img read more