Why My Pebble Smartwatch Beats The Samsung Galaxy Gear Hands Down

first_imgSamsung just announced its Galaxy Gear smartwatch … and the neurons in the early adopter lobe of my brain lit up like a Christmas tree. One look into its deep black 320-pixel square abyss and I was lost in a futuristic fantasy world, one where people don’t cower from me like the Terminator when I wear Google Glass—and one in which people need things like smartwatches. (Being me, naturally I need all of them.)See also: Galaxy Gear: The Dumb Thing About Samsung’s SmartwatchAs my prefrontal cortex wrestled those overstimulated brainparts into submission, I was left with one question: can anyone really need a smartwatch? Given the Galaxy Gear’s smartphone-sized price tag, let’s check the most important facts for a moment, shall we? Samsung Galaxy Gear Smartwatch:$299, on sale in the U.S. in OctoberCompatibility: At launch, only the Samsung Galaxy Note 3 and Tab 10.11.63-inch Super AMOLED display, 320 x 320 resolutionSix wristband colorsA 1.9 MP cameraA speaker and two microphones25 hour battery lifePebble Smartwatch:$150, available nowCompatibility: Any Android or iOS device with Bluetooth1.26-inch black and white e-paper display, 144 x 168 resolution 5 wristband colors3 axis accelerometer with gesture detectionBattery lasts about 1 week (168 hours)A Pebble Owner Reflects My Pebble smartwatch was an impulse buy. After missing the original Kickstarter campaign, I forgot about the buzzy little wristbound thing altogether.But a few weeks ago, far afield from the urban technology bustle, I noticed a whole gaggle of Pebbles hanging limply on a Best Buy rack in some kind of indiscriminate “quantified self” aisle. I hate Best Buy with the fire of one thousand suns. But a gadget in the hand is worth a pre-order in the bush, so I bought one.See also: Samsung: Galaxy Gear Will Eventually Play Nice With Rival PhonesMy biggest surprise so far? I actually love it. But that doesn’t mean I needed one—or that anyone does. Sure, we arguably don’t need any of consumer tech that we gobble up, but the smartwatch concept seems to weigh in far heavier on the side of convenience than that of utility.Given that, a smartwatch really needs to be, you know, convenient. The Galaxy Gear boasts a measly battery life of a single day. That alone isn’t just a strike against the Galaxy Gear—it renders the device an absurdity considering the way that we humans want to use things like wristwatches. Like, every day.More Smartwatch Bang For Your BuckAfter testing one for a few weeks, I realize that a smartwatch is a strange little contraption. Though handy at times, it’s largely superfluous. If I hadn’t needed a new watch—like, a dumb watch that just tells time, I mean—I probably couldn’t justify having one at all. The Rise and Rise of Mobile Payment Technology Role of Mobile App Analytics In-App Engagement Related Posts What it Takes to Build a Highly Secure FinTech … Why IoT Apps are Eating Device Interfaces Tags:#Kickstarter#Pebble#Samsung#smartwatch#wearable#Wearable Computing taylor hatmaker Being roughly the same price as a nice dumbwatch, the Pebble lays some solid groundwork for the emerging wearable category. But the Galaxy Gear? At $299, twice the price of the Pebble, the purchase would be nigh impossible to justify. The Pebble isn’t overpriced, but it isn’t cheap enough for me to recommend to my non tech-obsessed friends, either.Smartwatches inject our day to day lives with a couple ounces of sweet, sweet convenience. And that’s pretty much it. I use my Pebble to get texts and emails so I don’t have to reach for my Nexus 4 or subject the world to Google Glass. I use it to flip songs on Rdio on the speakers in my living room. I look at the time. It’s a nifty little gadget, but it is by no means essential. All Eyes On AppleAt its big event next week, Apple may well release an iWatch. In true Apple fashion, the smartwatch concept will likely see its most refined iteration to date. Still, until we can cram $299 worth of technology onto a platform the size of a postage stamp, a smartwatch priced like a full-fledged smartphone will remain a luxury perched in the upper echelons of early adopterdom.Next week, if Apple really wants to pop the cork on the smartwatch craze for mainstream consumers, it’ll price an iWatch even lower than the $150 iPod nano, which wasn’t too shabby as a modded proto-smartwatch. If Apple doesn’t do it, I guess we can sit back and wait for Amazon or Google to get interested and take smartwatch pricing to the chopping block, like those companies did with tablets. Or better yet, we can resist the smartwatch siren song altogether and forgo plugging in yet another device at night so it can greet us bright and early.Until the price is right, that is.Lead image courtesy of Pebble; image of Pebble smartwatch by Taylor Hatmakerlast_img read more

Not SAI’s duty to treat Dutee so shabbily

first_imgSports View by S. Kannan.The Sports Authority of India has shown complete insensitivity in dealing with the plight of young and promising athlete Dutee Chand.Days before the Indian track and field team was to leave for Glasgow to compete in the Commonwealth Games, news broke that the Orissa girl was ineligible to compete because of an increased androgen level in her body. In the normal course, androgen (primarily testosterone) levels are usually associated with a male athlete. However, in case there is suspicion that a female athlete exhibits certain male characteristics and it gives her an extra edge over the field, there is cause for checking for hyperandrogenism.This is not the first time a female athlete from India has been embarrassed and made to feel like a dope cheat. Call it exuberance or sheer callousness, the way the SAI and the Athletics Federation of India has dealt with Dutee is awful.Sources in SAI say a test was called for by the AFI on the reigning 100 and 200 metres sprint champion as it felt something was amiss. Whether it was due to certain changed physical characteristics or something else is best known to the AFI.Then again, this is not the first time a female athlete at home has faced such trauma. To be sure, every other person knows the names of Shanti Soundarrajan, silver medalist at the 2006 Doha Asian Games, who failed a gender test.The name of Pinki Pramanik is even more famous, as the 2002 Busan Asian Games gold medalist flunked a gender test and was later accused of rape in Kolkata. If you talk to old timers who were part of India’s campaigns as long back as the 1978 Asian Games in Bangkok, a track and field athlete failed a gender test. Yet, the officials showed great care in keeping her name under wraps.advertisementAthlete Dutee Chand.Not many would know that the athlete in question was so traumatised, her teammates and coaches felt she could even have committed suicide at that point of time. Nobody went to the media and shouted out her name. Her anonymity is something which needs to be respected and she continues to work even today with the Indian Railways. Then again, in 1990, at the Beijing Asian Games, a woman hockey player failed a gender test and had to be sent home. In an age when TV channels were not around to rip open privacy and the internet did not exist, the player returned home safe and sound.Coming back to Dutee, it was not SAI’s duty to issue a press release and vilify her (without mentioning her name). Today, it is well known that the International Olympic Committee (IOC) and the international athletics body (IAAF) have stopped conducting gender tests as it has become so sensitive.Tests for hyperandrogenism are well prescribed and even in India the government has laid down the SOP (standard operative procedure) in black and white. If at all the SAI and AFI cared for Dutee, they would not have meted out such treatment to her. WHEN it comes to an athlete failing a dope test, what the SAI does is to inform the concerned federation and athlete. Once the ‘A’ sample comes positive, a test is ordered on the second sample called ‘B’. Mind you, nobody is in a hurry to tell the world a dope cheat has been caught.Benefit of doubt has to be given to athletes, as was the case in 2010 at home when so many athletes tested positive for MHA (methylhexanamine). The athletes said they were innocent and health supplements could be the cause. This time, Dutee has been painted like a cheat by the SAI, unmindful of the fact that she did not use anything to boost her hormone levels for achieving any advantage.In an age where the media feasts on sensational news, Dutee has become a victim for no fault of hers. As if to rub salt into the wounds, we have thick-skinned officials who tell us she could again compete as a female athlete if her androgen levels are below the prescribed limits of 2 nanograms per millilitre. For those unaware of the jargon, a nanogram is one-billionth of a gram!Logic demanded that the SAI and the AFI spoke to Dutee and her family in Orissa and pointed out that something was wrong. After that, she could have been pulled out of the squad. At least, that way, the young girl would not have been subjected to this kind of public humiliation where the average person now wonders if she is a boy or a girl.advertisementToday, when rape cases are mentioned, the name of the victim is not supposed to be given away. Take the case of the December 16, 2012 gang-rape victim in New Delhi. By and large, people have shown care in respecting her personal identity. The SAI, best known as a body which maintains stadia in India, cannot be allowed to get away with something which borders on character assassination. Athletes crave for respect, more so when they are down and out. Ideally, I would not have named the athlete, but it’s now out in full glare in public domain.s.kannan@mailtoday.inlast_img read more

‘Our Neighbourhood’ Grants

first_imgApplications are now open for the Australia Post Our Neighbourhood grants which are aimed at funding community projects that build a more healthy and inclusive Australia.Applications for the grants close on Friday, 28 June 2013, with one-off cash grant payments of between $1000 and $25,000 on offer, with grant amounts based around how strongly the community project or initiative includes and supports disadvantaged groups in Australia.The initiative is aimed at giving services that met these criterions a needed boost, in order to provide all Australians with necessary services, maintain and support diversity, grow community spirit and help areas recover from previous crisis.If you believe your community project or initiative may be eligible for a grant or to find out more information, please visit http://ourneighbourhood.com.au/grants/community-grants.html.Related LinksOur Neighbourhood Grantslast_img read more

Reader question: What’s a good framework for a fundraising plan?

first_imgToday, I’m answering another reader question. Beth asks:Can you provide a basic (simple) framework to create a fundraising plan (or resources to do so) – for a brand new nonprofit and their completely new to fundraising staff? Thanks!Here’s what Network for Good recommends in our Fundraising Campaign in a Box. (You can get the whole free kit here. It has worksheets, templates, etc.)1. Figure out what you’re trying to accomplish.Any campaign worth its salt is about getting results. What results are you and your organization looking to achieve? When you’re planning your outreach, remember these three tips:There is no such thing as “the general public”…Instead, you need to segment your communications to be effective and targeted.Some audiences are more important than others. Think about your goals and who holds the key to your success. Lack of participation from primary groups can cause your campaign to falter or fail.2. Determine how you’re going to accomplish your goals (tell a great story).So – you have groups of people and actions you want them to take. How are you going to tell your story in a compelling manner? What themes, messages and ideas are you going to take from your arsenal of content to encourage action? Need inspiration? Read How to Tap into the Heart and Soul of Your Organization When You Write.3. Determine which communications channels you’ll use.There are a variety of online and offline channels that you can use to send the right message to the right audiences. Examples of online channels include your website, search marketing, email marketing and social networking. Offline channels include things like direct mail, paid advertising and public relations.4. Decide which resources you need to get the job done.Ensure that you have all of your tools and resources in place to make your job-and the jobs of your audience(s)-as easy, effective and cost-effective as possible.Is email an important part of your plan, but you’re still communicating with supporters via Outlook? (eek! Stop what you’re doing and read 5 Steps to Choosing the Ideal Email Service Provider)Is your website well-branded and easy to use, with a clear way to donate?Is your website set up to take safe, secure online donations? (I of course recommend Network for Good!)5. Determine who will execute your campaign steps.Accountability will make or break the success of a campaign. As much fun as it is to pass the buck, now is as good a time as any to decide which members of your organization, board or volunteers are responsible for the different portions of your campaign.6. Lay out how you will measure your success.In the case of holiday fundraising, this could be as simple as a dollar sign with a number after it. But take a moment to consider what other goals you may have. Wow your organization’s Board and leadership with conversation rates, list-building, website traffic and any other number results into which they can sink their teeth.7. Set your timeline and benchmarks.One of the defining features of a campaign is that it has a defined start and end. Now that you have planned out the ‘who, what and why’ questions of your campaigns, it’s time to determine the when. Continue to build your campaign plan by setting ownership and deadlines for the associated activities. Begin with the end in mind – if your campaign will run from 11/1 – 12/31, work backwards to be sure that all activities will happen in a smooth manner. Don’t use magical thinking to set deadlines! Run activities in parallel if you are worried about compression time-wise.Good luck!last_img read more

Fundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer Fundraising

first_imgFundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer FundraisingPeer fundraising, also called peer to peer fundraising, has become a popular way to raise money, but it is also exceptionally useful for spreading the word about your cause. In addition to meeting your nonprofit fundraising goals, you also gain new supporters.How Peer Fundraising WorksYour existing supporters become your first line of outreach in a peer fundraising campaign. As with any fundraiser, you begin with your plan. Then, instead of just sending out your appeal, you also send out a request to forward your information, share on social media, etc. to your supporters’ own personal networks. With minimal effort, you are able to turn your supporters into advocates for your cause and have them help raise the money your organization needs.Keep It SimpleBecause you are so passionate about your cause, your organization, and fundraising, it can be tempting to provide your supporters with too much information. Your supporters can get easily overwhelmed if they feel like they are being asked to do anything that’s too involved. Therefore, ensure your peer fundraising materials are more simplified than what you might present otherwise.You still need to make a strong case, and nothing does that better than engaging stories. Make it clear with your heading that it is a story, and use a layout that indicates a quick read, as opposed to an academic presentation of the “facts,” so that people will be drawn in and not be afraid they don’t have the time to read it now.Peer Fundraising Is an Online EndeavorInclude links to your donation page wherever it’s appropriate. If your organization gains a supporter, but she can’t figure out how to contribute, then the effort was wasted. Your supporters know that they are asking for money and their friends recognize the technique by now.Taking advantage of peer fundraising has enabled even very small nonprofit fundraising efforts to reach huge numbers of people. Don’t be afraid to get your feet wet in this new, and fun, approach!Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your peer fundraising efforts. Call us today at 1-855-229-1694 to learn more!last_img read more

Maternal Health Commodities: Looking Beyond Medicines

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on August 16, 2012October 12, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of a blog series on maternal health commodities. To view the entire series, click here.Written by: the Fistula Care team at EngenderHealth.The UN Commission on Life-Saving Commodities is working to improve access to essential but overlooked maternal health medicines, such as oxytocin, misoprostol, and magnesium sulfate. This is welcomed, wonderful news: Proper access to these drugs will save the lives of many women every year. As we consider how to improve mothers’ health worldwide, however, we must recognize that life-saving medicines are only a part of the story. Facilities require equipment and supplies to save lives, too.On the USAID-funded Fistula Care project, we at EngenderHealth have given some thought to the essential obstetric equipment that hospitals should have on hand. As it turns out, very little on our equipment list is exclusively for genital fistula repair surgery. The same retractors, specula, scissors, scalpels, and forceps can largely be used not only to repair fistula, but also to enable health providers to carry out cesarean sections, laparotomy and other surgeries. That is, the same tools that enable trained surgeons to repair fistula can also allow hospital staff to provide the comprehensive emergency obstetric care that will prevent fistula – not to mention maternal deaths.Equipment requirements go beyond surgical kits: Autoclaves, operating tables, and appropriate lighting can improve care hospital-wide. All equipment – both large and small – must be appropriately maintained and, when necessary, repaired. Ensuring local capacity for maintenance and repair is therefore essential.A functioning surgical service also needs supplies – items like gloves, disinfectant, gauze, and sutures that will naturally be used up and need replenishing. These items share the supply chain needs of the essential medicines, and it follows logically that improving access to lifesaving drugs could efficiently translate into systems able to maintain and appropriately distribute necessary consumables, too.Costing of consumables for maternal health is acknowledged as an issue that has not received sufficient attention. Our recent cost study assessed the average consumption of supplies related specifically to fistula surgery. Just like our equipment list, most consumables for fistula repair overlap with those required for emergency obstetric care.Can the UN commission include equipment and consumables among its concerns? Perhaps not, since its specific focus is central to its success. Nevertheless, all players in the maternal health field would do well to keep in mind that lifesaving medicines are just part of the story. Properly maintained, functional equipment and appropriate consumables also save lives.Learn more about the Fistula Care project here.Share this:last_img read more

Over 28,000 Deaths in the First Day of Life in Bangladesh Reminds the Urgency of MNH Services Integration

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 6, 2014June 23, 2017By: Mohammod Shahidullah, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Neonatology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical UniversityClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of the Maternal and Newborn Integration Blog Series, which shares themes of and reactions to the “Integration of Maternal and Newborn Health: In Pursuit of Quality” technical meetingA new mother and her six-day-old baby receive a postnatal check up at the new government clinic in Badulpur, Habijganj, Bangladesh. Photo: CJ Clarke/Save the ChildrenThe continuum of care has become a rallying call to reduce the maternal deaths, stillbirths, neonatal deaths, and child deaths. Continuity of care is necessary throughout the lifecycle (adolescence, pregnancy, childbirth, the postnatal period, and childhood) and also between places of caregiving (including households and communities, outpatient and outreach services, and clinical-care settings). Within the continuum, all women should have access to care during pregnancy and childbirth, and all babies should be able to grow into children who survive and thrive.Unfortunately in the modern era of medical science, the program efforts addressing the health of mothers and newborns are often planned, managed, and delivered separately; though, from a biological perspective, maternal and newborn health are intimately linked.Integration of maternal and newborn health is an important approach to avoid separation between a mother and her newborn baby, places of service delivery, or at any event of health services. A persistent divide between training, programs, service delivery, monitoring, and quality improvement systems on maternal and newborn health limits effectiveness to improve outcomes. But it is evident that at the public health level, even with scarce human and financial resources, integrated service packages can maximize the efficiency for health services.In the last two decades Bangladesh has demonstrated extraordinary progress in reducing maternal and child deaths, but unfortunately, newborn mortality declined in a much slower pace and reduction of stillbirths was not even on the agenda. Fortunately, the country recently prioritized newborn survival and incorporated some priority interventions to reduce neonatal death. Improved delivery care services became one of the key strategies for improving child survival in addition to overall development of the health service delivery system.The following newborn-specific interventions are prioritized to achieve the commitment of ending preventable child deaths by 2035:Ensure essential newborn care, including neonatal resuscitation and application of chlorhexidine in the umbilical cordIntroduce and promote kangaroo mother care (KMC) for premature and low birth weight infantsEnsure proper management of newborn infection with antibiotics at the primary care levelsEstablish specialized newborn care unit at the sub-district and district levelEnsuring delivery by skilled birth attendants at the community levels and establishing an effective referral linkage to ensure continuum of care from community clinics to the sub-district, district and higher level hospitals—which can provide round the clock emergency obstetric and newborn care—are actions incorporated in the declaration. These give a clear indication of the government vision on integrated approaches to improve maternal and newborn health.Intra-partum complication, prematurity-related complications and newborn sepsis are the major causes of newborn death is Bangladesh. Without integration of maternal and newborn health we cannot reduce mortality especially due to the fact that intra-partum complications and prematurity-related complications together cause 67% of all newborn deaths in the country. Bangladesh recently scaled up the Helping Babies Breathe initiative and that is a unique example of integration of maternal and newborn health.Every year in the first day of life, 28,100 newborns of Bangladesh die indicating the importance of integration of maternal and newborn services in pursuit of quality of care.This post originally appeared on the Healthy Newborn Network Blog and has been lightly edited.Share this:last_img read more

3 Reasons Your Grantmaking Strategy May Not Be Working

first_imgPictured Here: Central Alabama Community Foundation – what they’re doing is working.It’s understandable. Programs, not payroll nor paperclips, create excitement and enthusiasm among your board, grant committee, and community when it comes to awarding grants. However, if you are in the philanthropy business, you are in the capacity-building business. We can’t create the type of long-term, lasting change we seek without strong organizations. As grantmakers, we’re dependent on nonprofit leaders that can sustain and scale their impact without applying for more grant dollars.To borrow an example from our for-profit friends, have you ever seen the show “Shark Tank” on ABC?If so, you know that the first questions asked after the entrepreneur’s pitch will be, “What are your sales for the last year?” and “How much do you plan to sell this year?”The sharks dig into the company’s ability to effectively market, sell and scale their product, before digging into its competitive advantages or how it’s manufactured.The sharks know that investing in sales and marketing isn’t a separate strategy. It’s an integral part of their investment strategy. More precisely, it’s the path to their return.I have never met an investor that restricts their funds from sales and marketing. That would be foolish. Investors (funders) depend on a company’s revenue growth, increased profits and sales multipliers to create a return on their investment (impact).In the same way, nonprofit capacity and sustainability are not separate or standalone strategies. They are critical components of all grants and to ensuring our philanthropy creates long-term, lasting impact.Yet, we reverse this order all the time. We ask the nonprofit about its programs, outcomes, and impact, and then maybe (not always) we’ll dive into a sustainability plan.Now, you may be thinking, why don’t we just fund sustainable nonprofits and stop this article here? We can just reject nonprofits that need to build their capacity, right?Well, we wouldn’t have many eligible applicants. According to Network for Good’s 2017 research across 10,000 nonprofits, the overwhelming majority heavily relied on single‐source funding.A startling 78 percent of nonprofits applying for grants have no written or specific fundraising plan to sustain their program, after the grant period (on the other hand, 85 percent view their funders as credible, go-to sources for technical fundraising assistance). Further, according to a new report released by GuideStar, approximately 50 percent of U.S. nonprofits are operating with less than one month’s cash reserves.Therefore, if we want to create long-term change and lasting good, we must stop referring to the capacity building as a standalone strategy. We must view it as part of a comprehensive, holistic strategy – as being implemented by the Central Alabama Community Foundation.[CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO]Nonprofits Must Respond to Emerging Needs, Not Live by ContractsDo you believe the environmental challenges we face today are the same as 50 years ago? Do you believe child development and education is unaffected by the growth in social media?As our communities’ complex challenges evolve, we must ensure that the nonprofits we fund have the resources they need to stay nimble and responsive.Nonprofit leaders operating with razor-thin margins, no process to measure success or retain talent will be caught flat-footed during times of emerging needs or a shifting landscape.So, practically speaking, what can you do?As part of The Walton Family Foundation’s Environment Grant reports, nonprofits are asked, “What notable obstacles did you face during this grant period?” as well as, “What changes to the project were made?”The program staff is interested in knowing how work plans, staffing, and timelines may shift throughout the grant period. This enables them to coach the grantee on navigating unforeseen challenges, re-allocating funds from the original proposal or calling in additional support, instead of using the report to rigidly enforce grant contracts.What would happen if you asked your grantees these questions in your reports?Short-Term Strategies Don’t Fix Long-Term ChallengesDo you believe that racism has been wholly eradicated? Do you feel all Americans have affordable health care? No, of course not. These issues are multifaceted and will, undoubtedly, continue to evolve in the foreseeable future.If we wish to confront longstanding issues plaguing our communities, grant strategies must be designed with the long-term in mind. However, grant funding is inherently short-term in nature (do you know any funders that make 10-year commitments through an annual grant cycle?).Yet, how often do we measure outcomes created 10 years after the grant period ends? Do we know if those dollars are creating the same impact today? Has the program declined?Hopefully not.Shifting to multi-year commitments is not sufficient. We must ensure with greater certainty that our grantees have the capacity to self-fund their programs, long after the grant period.So, practically speaking, what can you do?The YouthBridge Community Foundation is an emergent, three-staff member foundation in St. Louis, Mo. The foundation’s CEO, Michael Howard, regularly educates YouthBridge donors and donor-advised fundholders on how to make gift decisions with the long-term in mind.“You’ve proven your commitment to lasting good and meaningful change,” was the headline phrase from a recent newsletter, educating stakeholders on why the foundation is building the capacity of local nonprofits. This education is enabling YouthBridge to increase their investment in the fundraising capacity of nonprofits serving children and youth in the St. Louis area.Do your board members and donors understand the importance of nonprofit sustainability? How might you educate them in your next communication?Community Needs Outweigh Grantmaking BudgetsWill you be able to fund 100 percent of the letters of inquiry or grant applications you receive this year?Most likely not.This is where we derive the phrase, “competitive grantmaking.” Grantmaking is competitive because needs (generally) always outweigh grant dollars available.Because grantmaking is a zero-sum game (a dollar here can’t be invested there) we need to measure the “impact-per-dollar” of each grant. We must ask ourselves, “Will we create more outcomes if we invest a dollar into this program or that one?”To expand this metric with confidence, grantmakers should pair grant dollars with an investment in an organization’s fundraising capacity. Network for Good has found that, on average, every $1 invested into a nonprofit’s fundraising capacity produces $10 in the program or general operating funding. These are dollars that can be used to amplify and expand the nonprofit’s impact—without tying up additional grant dollars from the funder.So, practically speaking, what can you do?The Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation recently revamped its annual grants process to provide community impact staff with greater depth and insight into the applicant’s strengths and weaknesses.During this process, nonprofits are asked to express any concerns about their ability to financially sustain their programs, and some even take a comprehensive assessment. For a group that identifies fundraising as a core challenge, a micro-grant for fundraising services is bundled into their award, ensuring that the organization not only diversifies revenue but also increases the impact of each grant dollar over time.Have you considered bundling a micro-grant for fundraising capacity alongside a restricted or program grant? Could you pilot this concept with a handful of your grantees?Please comment.  We would like to hear from you.last_img read more

NFG Staff Profile: Rezarta Haxhillari

first_imgRezarta joined the NFG family as Director of Customer Experience. She is passionate about making an impact and giving back in any way she can. Her goal is to empower nonprofits so they can “do more good” in their communities. Rezarta is a seasoned traveler and has been all around the world! In her free time, you can catch Rezarta watching The Bachelor franchise and planning her next adventure!“I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine.”Q&A with Rezarta Haxhillari, Customer Experience DirectorWhat do you do at Network for Good?I lead our Customer Experience team, which ensures we deliver the best experience possible to all our customers. Our goal is to successfully on-board customers when they first join the NFG family and encourage continued engagement with our products and services throughout their journey with us. By doing so, we are helping them achieve their organizational goals that allow them to “Do More Good” in the communities they serve.What is your experience with nonprofit organizations outside of Network for Good?I served as an Executive Director of a nonprofit organization called The Gjergj Kastrioti Scholarship Fund for three years. I now serve on the organization’s Board of Directors. I believe this experience is very valuable for my current role at NFG as I have a deep understanding of the challenges some of our customers may face.What attracts you to nonprofits? I love giving back to society in any way I can. Working alongside organizations with a strong mission and positive impact in their communities remains a passion of mine. At NFG, we help thousands of nonprofits and charities daily. Consequently, we have an indirect influence on the ability to change people’s lives, which is an incredibly rewarding feeling!What do you enjoy most about your work? I enjoy speaking with our customers and hearing about the milestones and growth they are reaching as a result of using our products and services. I’m a proponent of adding convenience in everyday tasks. So, it’s extremely rewarding to hear when our platform makes their lives easier and helps them become successful.What do you enjoy doing outside work? I love to travel. In fact, I’ve visited over 40 countries! It’s gratifying to visit and learn about new cultures and historical facts unique to each country I visit. When I travel somewhere new, I visit local museums, take part in interesting attractions, and explore the restaurant scene (so much delicious food to be tried!)Lightning RoundDream vacation? Not sure about a dream vacation destination, but a two-week vacation to any new country is always a good idea! During the first week I would tour the city, eat local food, listen to local music and get a sense of the area’s unique characteristics. The second week would be just a period to relax. Maybe a beach in that country? Yes, that sounds like a lovely vacation Most recent book read? I just finished “End Game” by David Baldacci and I would absolutely recommend it if you’re into fast-paced thrillers. I’m also a fan of anything written by James Patterson and John Grisham. All three write quick page-turners!Last movie seen in movie theater? “Green Book”, an Oscar-nominated biographical comedy-dramaTheme song? “Happy” by PharrellFavorite color? FuchsiaAll time favorite athlete? Serena WilliamsRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img read more

15 New Jobs in Maternal Newborn Health!

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on July 15, 2016July 28, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Interested in a position in maternal, newborn or reproductive health? Every month, the Maternal Health Task Force rounds up job and internship postings from around the globe.AfricaCommunications Director: Population Services International (PSI); Dar-Es-Salaam, TanzaniaCountry Director – Liberia: Jhpiego; LiberiaQuality Improvement Practitioner: Jacaranda Health; Nairobi, KenyaSenior Technical Advisor – Maternal Health and Family Planning: Jhpiego; MaliAsiaClinical Trainers: EngenderHealth; Bihar, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning & Evaluation (Delivery Efficiency, Mechanisms, & Financing): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaSenior Program Officer, Measurement, Learning and Evaluation (Health Coverage, Quality, & Delivery): Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation; New Delhi, IndiaEuropeResearch Fellow in Reproductive & Maternal Health: London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine; London, EnglandNorth AmericaCommunications and Development Manager: Global Health Media; Waitsfield, VTCommunications Coordinator: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Communications Specialist: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C.Policy Communications Officer, Advocacy & Public Policy: PATH; Washington, D.C.Program Officer – Zika: Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Baltimore, MDSpecialist, Communication and Advocacy, Global Health: Save the Children; Washington, D.C.Technical Writer: Jhpiego; Washington, D.C. Is your organization hiring? Please contact us if you have maternal health job or internship opportunities that you would like included in our next job roundup.Share this:last_img read more