Athletic give Inaki Williams deal to 2025

first_imgTransfers Inaki Williams signs new long-term Athletic contract Tom Webber 17:19 1/17/18 FacebookTwitterRedditcopy Comments(0) Inaki Williams Marcelo Athletic Bilbao Real Madrid La Liga Getty Images Transfers Athletic Club Primera División The 23-year-old winger has attracted interest from Liverpool, but will remain at the Basque outfit after extending his deal Inaki Williams has put pen to paper on a mammoth seven-and-a-half-year contract extension with Atheltic Club.The 23-year-old winger was previously linked with a switch to Liverpool but has committed his long-term future to the Basque club, where he is now tied until 2025.Williams’ new contract includes a release clause of €80 million that will progressively rise until it reaches €108m, figures which exceed the fee required to take star centre-back Aymeric Laporte away from Athletic. Article continues below Editors’ Picks Lyon treble & England heartbreak: The full story behind Lucy Bronze’s dramatic 2019 Liverpool v Man City is now the league’s biggest rivalry and the bitterness is growing Megan Rapinoe: Born & brilliant in the U.S.A. A Liverpool legend in the making: Behind Virgil van Dijk’s remarkable rise to world’s best player The news will come a boost to fans with goalkeeper Kepa, whose deal expires at the end of the season, heavily linked with a move to Real Madrid.Williams has featured in all 19 of the club’s outings in La Liga this season, contributing four goals and three assists.He also scored twice as Athletic progressed to the knockout stages of the Europa League, where they will play Spartak Moscow in the last 32.last_img read more

How to Make Your Mission More Compelling

first_img3. Speak in story.Last, make sure you are describing what you do through story, not just facts and jargon. Stories make a cause relatable, tangible and touching. Remember, a good story has a passionate storyteller (you), clear stakes and a tale of transformation at its core. The NRDC, an organization focused largely on process and the work of lawyers and scientists, does an amazing job with storytelling all over its home page. There are heroes with a heartbeat to show every dimension of their work in stories. Many nonprofits have trouble making their missions relatable and exciting to potential supporters. I often get questions like this one from Deirdre:“As an organization with a mission that is a bit more abstract than, say, feeding hungry children or saving whales, we often struggle to make our work concrete. How can organizations dedicated to civic engagement or research create an inspiring story?”Whatever your issue area, these three tips will make your cause clear and compelling.1. Describe your mission as a destination.Don’t talk about your process or philosophy. Talk about your outcomes.Let me give you an example. Dan and Chip Heath, authors of Switch and Decisive, provide a great example from a breast care clinic as envisioned by Laura Esserman. She could have described her mission in ways that focused on the building or the philosophy. For example:  “We are going to revolutionize the way breast cancer is treated and create a prototype of the next-generation breast cancer clinic.” Another poor choice:  “We are going to reposition radiology as an internal, rather than external, wing of the clinic, and we will reconfigure our space to make that possible.” These all fall into the customary trap of talking about HOW your approach your work rather than WHAT the end result will be. (They also make the mistake of having no people in the description of their cause, but that’s the second point below.) What would be better? The Heaths nail it: “A clinic with everything under one roof—a woman could come in for a mammogram in the morning and, if the test discovered a growth, she could leave with a treatment plan the same day.” You can see the destination clear as day. 2. Give your mission a pulse.You have to talk about what you do in a way that makes clear its effect on people or animals. If you don’t have a heartbeat to your message, no one will care about your cause. Suppose you are advocating for quality schools. Don’t get so lost in descriptions of quality education and advocacy techniques that you forget to talk about kids! This is one of the most common mistakes I see. Always answer the question, “at the end of the day, whose life is better for what we do?” I like how Jumpstart talks about their work in early childhood education. They put it this way: “Working toward the day every child in America enters kindergarten prepared to succeed.”last_img read more

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Use the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly to Strengthen Your Donor Communications

first_imgDonor communications that connect—that appreciate, energize, and activate your prospects and donors—are the key to fundraising success. But you already know that.What you may not know, however, is that few organizations do donor communications well. Most have lots of room to improve, as evidenced by the focus on donor communications in conference agendas, e-newsletters, blog content in the field, Facebook chats, Twitter discussions, and more. If that’s your organization, you’re not alone!Now, with the release of Integrated Fundraising: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, by Mal Warwick/DonorDigital, we have proof of the ways most donor communications fail and the impact of those failures. If you’ve asked for resources to strengthen donor communications and have been turned down or just haven’t found the time to tackle them, this is the kick in the pants you need. These striking findings come from a six-month study of donor communications—both online and offline—from 16 large nonprofits, following online contributions to each organization. Since “multichannel donors are more loyal than single-channel donors,” researchers focused on how much and how well outreach is coordinated across channels for a consistent, recognizable, and satisfying donor experience.What I love about this report is that the researchers share what’s good, bad, and ugly in multiple dimensions so we get an idea of what’s working well (that is, what to strive for and what’s happening in organizations you’re competing with for donor dollars), as well as what’s not. Take a look at these findings:Thank you letters—a reliable cultivation tactic—arrive way too late or not at all. The quickest thank you letter, sent via USPS, arrived in 12 days. The slowest took 28 days. Eight organizations didn’t mail a thank you at all.Most donor communications content is inconsistent—in tone, message, and or/graphics—across channels, so it’s more likely to confuse and annoy recipients than to strengthen loyalty or motivate them to give. Most organizations do reach out to donors via multiple channels.Follow-up appeals via direct mail are frequently implemented, but that second ask can come months after the initial online gift, diminishing its success rate.Sustainer programs (aka monthly giving) provide a strong base of revenue, especially during economic dips, and “new online donors are highly responsive to monthly giving recruitment.” But only one organization integrated its monthly giving ask into mail and email, whereas four didn’t make monthly giving asks at all. There’s much more to learn in the full report, and I recommend that you download it now. Wherever your organization currently sits on the good, bad, and ugly continuum, there’s always room to do donor communications better.With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

Great neighbors, but no casseroles.

first_imgMy peers and I are the Tweens of adulthood. We are old enough to remember the milkman delivering to the doorstep, and young enough to appreciate the poetry of rap music—at least some of it. We are the children of the baby boom, and the parents of Millennials.Growing up, we were defined by our neighborhoods. Our parents chose neighborhoods based on what today we call affinity groups: ethnicity, education, class, age of kids. Our social network was the neighborhood. Accomplishments were celebrated with neighbors, and challenges were tackled with neighbors, often accompanied by a casserole. Charity began at home.Networked NeighborhoodsBetween the 70s and today, neighborhoods ceased to be the centrifugal center of social networks. Yet the desire for connection remains. We 40- and 50-somethings watch our kids form “neighborhoods” on their Social Networks. Likes, status updates, and feedback have replaced the celebratory visit, but they reinforce the importance of celebration.And importantly, a neighbor in need can draw support from a city of virtual neighborhoods. In the Dragonfly Effect, Jennifer Aaker and Andy Smith tell an illustrative story: Sameer and Vinay, both afflicted with late-stage leukemia, used their networks to register 24,611 South Asian bone marrow donors in 11 weeks. There was an authentic need, clearly communicated, and “neighbors” around the country responded.Networks will increasingly power nonprofits.I recently re-read the Networked Nonprofit, by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine. It brings the networked nonprofit to life in this reflection.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls — lots of conversations — to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists.”Strong networks also support cultivation of major donors and passionate evangelists who provide the backbone for nonprofits as they grow. And through social networks, charities and community organizations can become ’causes’, moving digital citizens to fuel their missions with energy, engagement and – yes – money.Millennials, in particular, say the charities they support are one way they express themselves, and 87% of Millennials in a 2011 survey said “my priority is to look after my family and community; charity begins at home.” And the home that Millennials are most closely tied to is the one they have chosen, in their networked neighborhood.If causes can become authentic institutions of these networked neighborhoods, they will find a new group of supporters who will celebrate their successes and help them tackle their challenges…without the casseroles.Follow Jamie on LinkedIn to get more insights on giving and mobilizing your community.Photo credit: David K., plasticrevolver on Flickrlast_img read more

Nonprofit Spotlight: Firecracker Foundation

first_imgNetwork for Good works with so many amazing nonprofits and we want to introduce you to them and the great work they are doing! Because May is Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I want you to meet one of my favorite customers who is doing amazing work helping child sexual abuse survivors heal their whole being.Meet Firecracker Foundation The Firecracker Foundation challenges their supporters to build a blaze, to be a part of the network that keeps and builds the lively sparks in child survivors. From the adult survivors who serve as mentors to the therapists and yoga instructors who offer their time and expertise, Firecracker truly has built a community of healing around the children survivors they serve. That community isn’t just by happenstance; they’ve consciously made recurring giving the heart of their fundraising strategy as a way to ensure the continued success of their communal work. On a larger scale, however, The Firecracker Foundation is about community. Tashmica Torok, the founder of Firecracker, has built her organization around the historical idea of community members being charged with keeping the communal fire burning. From their mission to their fundraising strategy, this ethos of the many coming together for a common goal is extremely evident. We are honored to serve the Firecracker Foundation as their online donation software provider! You guys are amazing! Using Facebook to rally attendance at events is a great way to meet supporters where they already are: Facebook. During their year-end campaign Firecracker Foundation’s Instagram feed kept supporters updated on how close they were to hitting their goal. http://t.co/FKbNzanWBF #ItsTimeToAct #SAAM2015 #LetsEndViolence #SexualAssaultAwarenessMonth— The Firecracker Fdn (@FirecrackerFdn) April 7, 2015 Due to the sensitive nature of their work, it might not be safe to display the photos of those they serve. However, they embrace that challenge and still share images that show the impact of donors’ gifts, without showing clients’ faces. Social media gives organizations the unique opportunity of giving supporters an inside peek into all the work you do. In addition to their work with sexual abuse survivors, Firecracker Foundation also trains advocates. Their Model Stellar Social Media Don’t worry about constantly generating original content, share content that will resonate with your supporters and promote your mission. On a day-to-day basis, The Firecracker Foundation works with survivors of childhood sexual trauma through long-term strategies of therapy, arts enrichment, and yoga practice. Their work is focused on healing the whole individual. Firecracker Foundation takes their emphasis of community involvement and engagement beyond the clients they serve and the advocates they train. They also take that energy to social media. Check out these posts from their social channels: As one of our “Spotlight” nonprofits, we encourage you to take a look at the great work they’re doing and spread the love by following them on Instagram, Twitter, and Facebook.last_img read more

GMHC2013: Stay Tuned to the Live-stream!

first_imgPosted on January 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference is right around the corner! In an effort to engage a broad audience, the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the three plenaries will be live-streamed and archived. In addition, all conference sessions will be archived and available for viewing within 24 hours of presentation time.Stay tuned to www.gmhc2013.com to access the live-stream and archived videos.View the conference program here.About the conference:GMHC2013 is a technical conference for practitioners, scientists, researchers, and policy-makers to network, share knowledge, and build on progress toward eradicating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by improving the quality of maternal health care.The conference is co-sponsored by Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the Maternal Health Task Force at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.GMHC2013 will be held at the Arusha International Conference Center in Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013.Interested in guest blogging?Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! The MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about the issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are interested in sharing a guest post, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to post on your own blog or your organization’s blog. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Join the conversation on Twitter! #GMHC2013Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Manifesto for Maternal Health: Highlights From Women Deliver and Population Council

first_imgPlease join the conversation! Tell us about your work to improve maternal health over the past year and how it relates to the calls to action from the manifesto. Send an email to Kate Mitchell or Natalie Ramm or join the dialogue on Twitter using the hashtag #MHmanifesto and help us celebrate the anniversary of the manifesto for maternal health!Share this: Posted on March 4, 2014November 14, 2016By: Natalie Ramm, Communications Coordinator, Maternal Health Task Force, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Continuing the celebration of the one-year anniversary of the “Manifesto for Maternal Health,” this post showcases the work of Women Deliver and the Population Council to improve global maternal health.Women DeliverIn 2013, Women Deliver organized its third global conference in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It was one of the largest gatherings of policymakers, advocates, and researchers focused exclusively on women’s health and empowerment to date, bringing together over 4,500 participants from 149 countries.Women Deliver’s work focuses primarily on the Manifesto’s first and second principles, as we work to influence the post-2015 agenda. We are pushing for the post-2015 development framework to prioritize gender equality, with a specific focus on education and health, including access to reproductive health and family planning information and services.Last year, Women Deliver and the World Bank published a report highlighting the significant social and economic benefits of investing in girls and women and recommending specific policies to improve reproductive health outcomes. We also published a report about our 2013 global conference, including information about panelists, attendees, and sessions.Population CouncilA crucial gap in improving the quality of maternal health services is that the validity of many global benchmarks, including skilled attendance at birth, is largely unknown. To improve measurement of maternal health care received during labor and delivery (core area 10 in the Manifesto for Maternal Health), investigators at the Population Council, led by PI Ann Blanc, are conducting research to identify a set of indicators that that have the potential for valid measurement and integration into population-based data collection systems in developing country contexts. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

4 Lessons from the Trenches to Prepare for Giving Season

first_imgHere at Network for Good, we’re continuously innovating our platform. The best way we do this is by immersing ourselves in the lives of our nonprofit users to understand the everyday problems they are trying to solve.Last week, during a quarterly business review meeting in Baltimore, our team was challenged to meet with local nonprofits to help them drive awareness and increase funds. Below are the cliff notes from the day:The ChallengeWe arrived in Baltimore at 9AM on Wednesday, July 19. We broke into five teams and were given a task: find a nonprofit and help them fundraise leveraging the “Jobs to be Done” philosophy around functional, social, and emotional drivers. The team that raises the most, wins.The results: $7,360. In a single day.That’s $7,360 that went to five local nonprofits: Wide Angle Youth Media, Holistic Life Foundation, Playworks Maryland, Women’s Housing Coalition, and University of Maryland Baltimore.As we got to know these five nonprofits and the people who lead them, four lessons stood out. We thought we would share them in a new Blog Series to help you prepare for giving season.Here’s what we learned:1. Giving is an emotional act.We quickly learned the real-life value of emotionally driven appeals. Most of the donations we collected were from people who had an emotional connection to us. We had greater luck raising funds from text messages to our personal network than asking for donation on the streets – although we did both! This builds the case for the power behind peer-to-peer fundraising.2. Not all nonprofits are created equal, but they all face time and capacity challenges.Each nonprofit we helped had their own set of challenges to overcome. Some had more limited resources than others. Some had a lot of pressure on them to fundraise in order to serve their clients, while others needed more strategic help.  But what they all had in common was time and capacity challenges and the need for systems that would solve this problem.3. All of them wonder, “Are we doing enough?”All of the nonprofits we worked with that day shared concerns about their funding and sustainability. They wondered if they were doing enough to diversity their funding strategy. Creating a sustainable individual giving program and having the right mix of individual giving and additional funding sources are continual concerns.4. There’s nothing like the power of a team.When we set out to raise as much as we could in just one day, we quickly learned that we were all motivated to win the challenge because we all knew what we were working towards. We saw this at the nonprofits too, and believe those with a strong strategy were able to rally their troops and others around their cause more easily.Check back next week as we dive into the first lesson, on how you can leverage the emotional connection when developing your appeals this giving season.last_img read more

Fundraising with Direct Mail: What Every Small Nonprofit Needs to Know

first_img Let them know you care about more than their wallets. A good direct mail campaign is part of a comprehensive communication strategy. Ensure you are communicating with your community year-round, sharing the successes made possible through their support. Invite donors and potential donors to participate in events, volunteer, receive your newsletter, or follow your blog. But you should still respect their wishes. Give them the opportunity to ‘opt out’ of communications they don’t want, while still receiving the ones they do.Direct mail still matters. Take the time to be strategic and intentional with your direct mail efforts and you will see return on your investment. Your community will grow and your fundraising results will increase. Build a campaign page on your website that mirrors the core message of your letter.Shoot a brief, 2-minute video to share on social media.Send an email that will arrive within a few days of the expected letter arrival.Write a blog post that speaks to the same core message that is within your email appeal.Plan social media posts in and around the letter timing, to lift the message.The days of a one-and-done letter being effective are gone. When you are sick of hearing the message, it will begin to penetrate your audience. Make it as easy as possible for them to reply. Include a self-addressed envelope with postage on it if you can. (A U.S. Postal Service indicia makes it easy and allows you to only pay for those that are returned.) Also, make it easy for them to give online by including a direct and memorable URL that goes directly to your donation page. Make a compelling case and cast donors as the heroes. It is one thing to ask for money and quite another to invite people to join you in making a real difference. Are you ‘selling to them’ in your letter or offering them an amazing opportunity to partner with you for change? Think about what your donors care about and use your letter as a place to explain what you are doing about it. And a good direct mail appeal will answer the questions, “What’s in it for me?” and “Why should I care?” for the donor. Test and measure. After a campaign’s completed, take time to learn from it. Review your results, process what you’ve learned, and respond to feedback.Find out the percentage of people who responded and how many gave online as a direct response. This is easy to track if you have a branded donation page and have analytics on your website. If you don’t yet have these capabilities, then determine if you had an increase in online donations while your campaign was happening.Need a donor management system or branded donation page to help you track your campaigns? Talk to us!Other good questions to ask include:What number of donors responded to each list?What was the average gift size?What did you spend on the production and mailing vs. the return received?center_img Keep it simple and be concise. People are scanners. When they open your letter, if it is a sea of black type with no ‘design,’ they’ll lay it down and never read it. Or, they’ll just scan the first sentence of a few paragraphs and miss your core message.Just like a good sauce needs to be boiled down, reduce your message to as few words as possible. That means edit, then edit again. Use short paragraphs and bullet points. And always include a call-out box or a P.S. that hits your main point, as these are always read first. Cut through the clutter with layered messaging. From emails and text messages to Facebook posts, we are constantly bombarded with information. That’s why it is important for you to develop a layered communication strategy to compliment your direct mail campaign. Here are a few ideas: A solid development plan used to rise and set around direct mail, and while there are many new fundraising channels available today, direct mail can and should still be an important part of your plan. Here are seven steps to executing an effective direct plan campaign that’s also integrated into your overall communication and fundraising strategy.Begin with good data. Solid data management is the bedrock of effective direct mail. We all know how easy it is personalize content, so never start a letter “Dear friend.” People who receive your piece should feel like they are on a first-name basis with your organization. As best as you can, track relationships: Bob and Jane are married (Mr. & Mrs.), but Jane and Tom are mother and son (not Mr. and Mrs.). Try to capture birthdates so that a 5-year-old event participant doesn’t get an appeal.Data can also help you personalize what your piece says. For consistent givers, start by thanking them for their ongoing support. For those who have lapsed, make a compelling case for why they should come back. For those that have never given, draw them into your mission and let them know that even a small gift makes a big difference.last_img read more

Happy Valentine’s Day: Donor Love Infographic

first_imgLooking for a new way to show your donors some love this Valentine’s Day? Look no further! Let our Donor Love infographic show you the way. We’re here to help you with all your nonprofit fundraising and marketing needs, including:Campaigns & AppealsThank YousResults & ReportsDonor RelationsCommunicationsCheck out our donor love infographic today. Plus, hover over each image for a special surprise!Donor Love InfographicRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img

Three Approaches to Improving Maternal Mental Health From a Low-Resource Setting

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 17, 2015October 13, 2016By: Shamsa Zafar Rizwan, Professor and Head of Centre of Excellence-MNCH, Health Services Academy, PakistanClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of “Mental Health: The Missing Piece in Maternal Health,” a blog series co-hosted by the MHTF, the Mental Health Innovation Network at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Dr. Jane Fisher of Monash University.While working as an obstetrician and gynecologist for 20 years and as a reproductive and public health professional, I realized that there is a huge burden of psychosocial ill health of women that also impacts their physical health. Maternal mental health was the key area of my PhD research and I feel that I and professionals from reproductive and maternal health should be leading this cause jointly with mental health professionals.Universal approach to well-beingThe majority of developing countries have a high prevalence of maternal depression ranging from18-25%. Countries with a high prevalence of maternal depression need a universal approach to maternal psychosocial well-being during pregnancy and in the postnatal period. A universal approach means that all women in the perinatal period should receive an intervention on maternal psychosocial well-being, which is integrated into MNCH programs and is simple enough to be delivered by community health workers so as to prevent psychosocial morbidity. This approach does not require screening for depression and anxiety, which is at the moment hard to include in the programmes of LMICs. This approach will not be impacted by mental health stigma and will improve other health outcomes of the mother and child such as child development, growth and health-seeking behaviors. We have tried this approach in Pakistan and have found it to be feasible, easily integrated into MNCH programmes and acceptable by the community and community health workers.Integrate maternal mental health into primary careMaternal mental health interventions need to be integrated into the existing primary health care and maternal and child health programs. Integration has its challenges that include lack of human resources in the community, increased workload and lack of motivation of MNCH community health workers and difficulty garnering political and governmental buy-in. However, advocacy using local data, early involvement of politicians and government and simple, easy to integrate interventions that are developed through a participatory process are key to success.Innovation for scale upScale up of maternal mental health interventions is a challenge, especially where health systems are weak. One major issue is providing quality training and supervision of mental health for community health workers at scale. An innovative way to assist the scale up of evidence-based maternal mental health interventions is a technology-assisted cascade training and supervision system. We are working on developing this innovation in a low-resource, post-conflict area in Pakistan. This system for screening, monitoring and supervision for maternal depression includes three compotents:An interactive voice response-based assessment tool to screen depression in the community: A woman is asked by the health workers to call a toll free phone number where the two questions from the Whooley’s Depression Screen are asked and can determine if further, more detailed screening for maternal depression is neededA tablet-based manual, based on the mhGAP Thinking Healthy Programme: The Thinking Healthy Programme is an intervention that has shown success in treating maternal depression in developing countries and is delivered by community health workers. The use of technology allows standardized training to be delivered without the need of a specialist trainerA cascade training model: Using this model, specialists supervise, from a distance, the community health worker program supervisors, who in turn, supervise the community health workers as part of their normal routine.These innovative approaches to maternal mental health are all designed to enhance the availability to mental health services for the women who need them most.Read more about the scale up of the Thinking Health Programme in a post-conflict settingPhoto: “Rebuilding lives and hope in Pakistan, a year on from the floods” © 2011 Vicki Francis/Department for International Development, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

Celebrating One Year Since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference

first_imgWatch experts share their insights from GMNHC 2015 and ideas for next steps in maternal newborn health | Global Maternal Newborn Health: Current Progress and Future DirectionsNews stories from GMNHC 2015:UN set new targets to protect more moms, babiesCCTV America | June 2016Gates, Slim target maternal, newborn health in Central AmericaMichael O’Boyle, Reuters | October 2015Are we winning against maternal and infant mortality?Azad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Q&A: Mother-infant health progress requires no magicAzad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Melinda Gates’ keys to leadership (Las claves de Melinda Gates para el liderazgo)CNN TV | October 2015Melinda Gates: Still work to do in maternal, newborn healthChristopher Sherman, Associated Press | October 2015For more information, please visit:GMNHC 2015 websiteMHTF blog seriesMHTF events pageCommentary on the PLOS blog—Watch other videos from the MHTF.Don’t miss out on special announcements about upcoming events! Subscribe to receive updates from the MHTF.Share this: Political leadership should act on strong scientific evidence and empower the public.Global and national health communities must integrate strategies, services and funding streams.Reaching the most vulnerable, including adolescents, is an urgent priority.Maternal newborn survival efforts should improve maternal morbidities, stillbirths and child development.Increasing investments to improve quality of maternal newborn health services is necessary.Providers have an obligation to treat women with compassion and respect.Universal access to integrated sexual and reproductive health care is essential.Addressing gaps in measurement, information and accountability is key for assessing progress.Sharing success in maternal newborn health is an opportunity to strengthen health programs.Supporting all providers, especially midwives, is imperative. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Did you miss the conference? Videos of many of the sessions are available for you to watch online:Welcome Event | Julio Frenk, Christopher Elias, Pablo Kuri Morales, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Geeta Rao GuptaOpening Ceremony | Ana Langer, Mercedes Juan López, Melinda Gates, Babatunde OsotimehinKeynote Address | Hans RoslingThe Next Frontier: Approaches to Advance the Quality of Maternal Newborn Health Care | Ana Langer, Richard Horton, Fernando Althabe, Address Malata, Mouzinho Saide, Vinod PaulBenefiting Mothers and Newborns through Integrated Care | Koki Agarwal, Zulfiqar Bhutta, Joy Lawn, Nosa Orobaton, Jane Otai, Pronita Rani Raha, José VillarAddressing Equity and Reaching the Most Vulnerable Mothers and Newborns | Joy Riggs-Perla, Alain Damiba, Carolyn Miles, Anuradha Gupta, Cesar Victora, Alicia Ely YaminFAIL: First Attempt in Learning – Learning from What Doesn’t Work in Maternal and Newborn Health | Katja Iversen, Priya Agarawal, Sharad Agarwal, France Donnay, Margaret Kruk, Richard HortonMeasurement and Accountability: Better Data for Better Decision Making | Robert Clay, Muhammad Baharuddin, Agbessi Amouzou, Shams El Arifeen, Peter WaiswaFunding for Impact: Global Financing for Maternal and Newborn Health | Katie Taylor, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Roberto Tapia Conyer, Dinesh Nair, Mariam Claeson, Charles MwansamboClosing Ceremony | Mary Nell Wegner, Mary Kinney, Katja Iversen, Mary Mwanyika-Sando, Koki Agarwal, Joy Riggs-Perla, Ana Langer Posted on October 18, 2016January 6, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Exactly one year has passed since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, an event organized by the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) in collaboration with USAID’s flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program, Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children and other partners. Researchers, policymakers, funders, implementers and other stakeholders from around the world gathered in Mexico City to share new evidence, identify knowledge and implementation gaps, build inter-disciplinary consensus and discuss strategies for integrating and improving global maternal newborn health.Conference participants proposed ten critical actions necessary to create momentum for maternal newborn health:last_img read more

Are We Measuring Correctly? A Way Forward for Improving Maternal and Newborn Health Surveillance in Pakistan

first_imgPosted on February 17, 2017February 22, 2017By: Jasim Anwar, Doctoral Candidate, University of New South Wales, Sydney, AustraliaClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Globally, more than half a million women die each year from pregnancy-related causes, and almost all of those deaths occur in low- and middle-income countries. Pakistan is among the ten countries that comprised 58% of the global maternal deaths reported in 2013. Many births and deaths are not registered, and information on the cause of death is often unknown or unreliable. The lack of information about maternal mortality at the regional level and among high risk populations makes it difficult to identify target groups, for whom scarce resources should be focused. Similarly, risk factor data such as socioeconomic status and medical conditions are not routinely analyzed and reported. Therefore, it is not possible to determine the mortality rate of various high-risk subgroups within populations and to identify problems in a timely manner.In Pakistan, a significant reduction in maternal mortality from 431 deaths per 100,000 live births in 1990 to 178 deaths per 100,000 live births in 2015 has been achieved. However, the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) target of 140 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births was not achieved. The recent Pakistan Demographic and Health Survey (PDHS) estimated neonatal mortality at 55 newborn deaths per 1,000 live births, accounting for 74% of all infant deaths in Pakistan, while the perinatal mortality rate (death of an infant occurring between the seventh month of pregnancy through the first seven days of life) was estimated at 75 deaths per 1,000 pregnancies.Many births and deaths are not registered, and information on the cause of death is often unknown. As a result, maternal mortality estimates for Pakistan are likely underestimated. In countries where there is no maternal and child health surveillance system, surveys like the PDHS provide useful information to estimate morbidity and mortality, but their reach is limited.In our research project conducted under the University of New South Wales, Sydney, we estimated maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality rates by complete enumeration of all pregnancies, births, and maternal, perinatal and neonatal deaths in a rural district of Pakistan using an existing information system of the Lady Health Workers (LHWs) Programme. We also extended data collection to areas without existing information systems by recruiting community health workers (CHWs). The LHWs Programme covers about 70% of population in the Pakistan. Data from the LHWs Programme covered 79% of our study population; for the remaining 21%, we recruited CHWs to ensure 100% population coverage and, therefore, a more accurate and timely estimation of maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality rates—including area-specific causes of maternal and neonatal deaths.A total of 51,690 women between the ages of 18 and 49 years were recruited for the study. Any of these women who became pregnant between 1 June 2015 and 31 May 2016 were registered and followed throughout their pregnancies through 42 days after delivery. Births were counted and maternal, perinatal and neonatal mortality rates calculated. A “short household questionnaire” developed by the National Institute of Population Studies and used in the 2006-2007 PDHS was adapted for a cross-sectional survey of all households in the study area. Data were compared with those from the LHWs Programme and the PDHS 2012-2013. The causes of deaths were ascertained using World Health Organization’s verbal autopsy tool.Our research found variations in maternal, neonatal and perinatal mortality rates estimated using different information sources. Pakistan, as well as many other countries, currently have weak civil registration and vital statistics surveillance, often missing the most vulnerable women and children. Complete enumeration of all pregnancies, births, maternal, perinatal, and neonatal deaths provides the most reliable mortality estimates, thus enabling health authorities to monitor the progress and impact of ongoing public health programs in a timely fashion.—Learn more about Demographic Health Surveys.Read about the Lady Health Workers Programme in Pakistan.Search organizations working on maternal health issues in Pakistan. Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Saving Lives During Health Worker Strikes: Lessons From Kenya

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on November 21, 2017November 21, 2017By: Nicole Sijenyi Fulton, Team Leader, Options Consultancy Services Ltd.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)As project managers and organizational leaders, many of us oversee programs that strengthen the public sector to deliver high quality maternal and newborn health (MNH) services. Our efforts depend heavily on the functionality of the health workforce in the countries where we work.But what happens when public sector health workers are on strike? Health facilities in low-income countries often close down completely during industrial action, disrupting what can be the only health system accessible to poor individuals. This can have especially severe consequences for pregnant women and their newborns. When the public health workforce is not operating, many women and their families must choose between having a risky home delivery with an unskilled provider, going to an unaffordable private hospital or crossing the border into a neighboring territory.Public sector health workers go on strike for many reasons, usually as a last resort. In resource-poor settings, major staffing shortages are widespread, making individual workloads unsustainable. Supervision is often poor with limited access to training and development. Robust management systems are rarely in place, and health workers miss opportunities for career progression and salary adjustments over many years. Under these circumstances, doctors, nurses and other health professionals pursue collective bargaining not only for themselves, but in the long-term interests of the communities they serve.Over the past year, Kenya’s public health system has faced numerous strikes of multiple cadres, including nurses and clinical officers, sometimes for several months at a time. The latest national nurses’ strike lasted from June to October 2017. During these extended periods, most public dispensaries and health centers close their doors. Some hospitals remain open on a limited basis, but even when they do, service uptake drops dramatically and mortality rises. Recent media coverage in Kenya has indicated a potential doubling of maternal deaths during the recent nurses’ strike.While political action is underway, what can health program managers do to prevent maternal and newborn deaths? MNH programs in Bungoma, Kenya have revealed effective strategies for safeguarding the health of pregnant women and newborns under challenging circumstances.Supporting the faith-based sectorFor most poor families, the faith-based sector is the only option for facility delivery when the public sector closes because other private sector facilities tend to be too expensive. This trend is exemplified by shifts in where cesarean sections take place during and after strike periods in Bungoma, Kenya:Source: Kenya District Health Information System (DHIS2)This influx of patients creates an unmanageable workload for health workers and affects the quality of care they are able to provide.Programs can provide targeted support to health facilities in the faith-based sector in several areas:Procurement of essential drugs, supplies and equipment to ensure that over-crowded facilities can maintain high quality services during surges in patient volume.Mentorship programs for emergency obstetric and newborn care can be implemented so that nurses from public facilities on strike can practice their skills while assisting with staffing needs.Financial support to help offset higher operating costs.Program adaptationWhen health workers go on strike, health programs must adapt in the following ways:Fail fast. Learn from failure and move on quickly. Regular reviews of routine data will quickly point to a health system that is not working during a health worker strike and can offer clues for adjustment.Support decentralized decision-making. The staff who are closest to the ground are the ones who see the problems and the solutions most clearly—but they are often too far away from decision-making authority to change a programming approach without extensive consultation. Breaking down these barriers speeds up the change process.Be ready. After one strike ends, another one might be on the horizon. With each cycle, learn and adapt for the future.In the long term, health system reforms are needed to support the health workforce and equip it with sufficient resources to provide high quality care. In the meantime, program managers can play a critical role in ensuring quality MNH services are available during health worker strikes. Women are counting on us to roll up our sleeves, think creatively and work together to keep essential services available.—Read other posts from the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF)’s Global Maternal Health Workforce blog series.Browse maternal health organizations working in Kenya.Interested in writing for the MHTF blog? Check out our guest post guidelines.Share this:last_img read more

Tourism Minister Hails TPDCo

first_img Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, has hailed the Tourism Product Development Company Ltd (TPDCo) for its critical role in the advancement of the nation’s tourism sector.He said the entity continues to be a custodian of integrity and quality advancing the reputational value of the industry.“TPDCo stands in the gap between the promise made to the (tourists) in the marketplace and the experience they have when they get here,” the Minister pointedout.He was addressing TPDCo’s staff service awards luncheon at the Caymanas Golf and Country Club in St. Catherine on Tuesday (July 18).Minister Bartlett said the company will be required to play an even greater role as the country’s tourism product continues to evolve to meet the needs of themarketplace.“You have a larger role to play because the product is evolving; the experiences are changing and the attitude of our visitors and customers are equally inthat state of constant transition,” he pointed out.He said TPDCo will be required to be “nimble and adaptive” in order to ensure that Jamaica maintains its hold on tourism.Turning to developments at the Montego Bay Convention Centre (MBCC), Minister Bartlett said the facility registered a 65 per cent increase in revenue for thefiscal year ending March 31.There was also a 13 per cent reduction in operating expenses over the prior fiscal year and a 41 per cent increase in the number of meetings held at the MBCC.Mr. Bartlett informed that the MBCC is “now on the path for the first time to break even in its operational expenses over revenue”.“This tells you that with application, with serious management, with marketing…we have proven that a public good, which a convention centre provides, offers opportunities for economic activity in other areas,” he said.For his part, Chairman of the TPDCo, Ian Dear, congratulated the award recipients, who were recognised in the categories of Overachievers, Regional Star Performers, Innovator of the Year, Employee of the Year, and Manager of the Year.“As you receive your respective awards feel proud of your accomplishments and let these awards continue to motivate you to increased levels of productivity and inspire you to achieve improvements in the service quality to our stakeholders,” he urged.He told the members of staff that they are expected to deliver exceptional results in ensuring the continued success of tourism, which is a key sector for job creation, foreign exchange earnings and socio-economic empowerment.The Manager of the Year award went to Community Awareness Coordinator, Marlene Stephenson-Dally, for 2013/14 and 2014/15; and Former Procurement Manager, Julian Thompson for 2015/16.Employee of the Year for 2013/14 went to Doreen Forrester and Lorna Newsome for 2015/16. Minister Bartlett said the company will be required to play an even greater role as the country’s tourism product continues to evolve to meet the needs of the marketplace. “TPDCo stands in the gap between the promise made to the (tourists) in the marketplace and the experience they have when they get here,” the Minister pointed out. Tourism Minister, Hon. Edmund Bartlett, has hailed the Tourism Product Development Company Ltd (TPDCo) for its critical role in the advancement of the nation’s tourism sector. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Fifteen Aboriginal organizations reaffirm boycott of missing women inquiry

first_imgAPTN National NewsMissing Women Commission of Inquiry head Wally Oppal had invited all of the Aboriginal organizations currently boycotting the inquiry to return, saying their input was needed.But the groups have reaffirmed their boycott, with one representative calling the process “tainted and corrupt”, adding that they “don’t see how anything healthy and meaningful can come out of this inquiry at this time”.APTN National News reporter Rob Smith has the details.last_img