S&P: Canada to add 9GW of capacity in 2019, more than 75% wind, solar

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享S&P Global Market Intelligence ($):A total of 9,177 MW of power generation capacity is expected to be added to the Canadian grid in 2019, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence data. With 161 MW of capacity set to be retired, Canada could see a net gain of 9,016 MW.Wind and solar resources comprise about three-fourths of the new capacity expected to come into service this year, while the major retirement is a coal-fired plant. In two provinces, Alberta and Ontario, the electric system is managed by an independent system operator. In most other provinces and territories, the system is owned by the local government.At varying paces, provinces and territories have been reducing their fossil-fueled power generation capacity and replacing it with lower-emitting resources. In Alberta, for example, where 62% of Canada’s planned capacity additions for 2019 is located, the province has ordered all coal-fired capacity to be shut down by 2030, prompting utilities to both convert existing facilities to gas-fired capability and add new resources. In Ontario, all coal-fired generation capacity has already been shut, and the province has pushed for a combination of renewables, gas and nuclear resources.Wind accounts for over half of Canada’s planned capacity additions, at 5,200 MW. The Henvey Inlet Wind Project (Nigig Wind Farm) is the largest single project under construction, at 300 MW. U.S.-headquartered independent power producer Pattern Energy Group LP and Henvey Inlet First Nation subsidiary Nigig Power Corp. share ownership of the project, which is scheduled to begin operating in March on Georgian Bay. Ontario’s grid operator, the Independent Electricity System Operator, has a contract for the plant’s output.Solar accounts for 20% of scheduled 2019 additions, totaling 1,804 MW. The largest solar facility under construction is the Loyalist Solar Project, a 54-MW project in eastern Ontario. BluEarth Renewables Inc. and Mohawks of the Bay of Quinteshare ownership of the project, which is scheduled to begin operating in March, and the IESO will purchase the output.One Alberta coal plant accounts for almost all of the generating capacity to be retired in Canada this year. Independent power producer Maxim Power Corp. plans to shut its 150-MW HR Milner Generating Station (M1), which began operating in 1972, in December. It will be replaced with a larger gas-fired facility.More ($): Canada’s grid to add a net 9,000 MW of capacity in 2019 S&P: Canada to add 9GW of capacity in 2019, more than 75% wind, solarlast_img read more

Soho’s redemption

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Tinton Falls Intersection Again Under Discussion After Serious Collision

first_imgBut residents have put up resistance, suspecting the county’s motivation to widen Sycamore is to increase commercial traffic. Residents of the northern section of the borough have a website, savetintonfalls.com, where they charged that “our entire neighborhood is about to become a thru-way for Monmouth County.” “And my primary concern is safety,” he said. “A traffic light’s got to be there,” he said. “We’ve studied it and we’ve studied it and we’ve studied it,” he said. “And still nothing happens.” Turning said that in 2017, his last year as mayor, 14 people were injured in accidents at that intersection. “And we’ve been analyzing, monthly, the crash reports to determine whether or not there is a change in the pattern,” he said. “The problem is the county wants to put a five-lane intersection in there for their future traffic needs to push more traffic through all of the roads in Tinton Falls, including Hance and Hope and Sycamore,” said Sycamore Avenue resident Peter Kar vavites Aug.13. “We’ve asked for a light, we’ve asked for a turning lane and we’ve asked to reduce speed. The county has said ‘no,’ because all they want is a large highway cutting through a residential area.” “I think it’s too long been overlooked and not appropriately taken care of, catering to a small group of people who don’t want it done,” Baldwin said. “Shame on the county. It’s their road. They can fix it.” The county has studied and suggested improvements to that intersection and the nearby intersection of Sycamore Avenue and Hope Road, a municipal road. A 2018 traffic study and plan for the county showed the crash rate at Hance and Sycamore was more than twice the state average and that there were more than 20 injuries over a four-year period. The area is heavily travelled during the peak morning and afternoon drive times, the report found. The county has said widening the road is necessary for the traffic light to function properly, to avoid traffic backups extending through Hope Road and causing gridlock. A traffic light already exists at the intersection of Hope Road and Sycamore Avenue, a few car lengths away from the Hance and Sycamore intersection. FREEHOLD – Monmouth County Freeholders last week again heard concerns about a dangerous intersection of two county roads in Tinton Falls, with a former mayor and police chief of the borough saying something needs to be done after they said an elderly motorist was fatally injured there recently. By Philip Sean Curran Gerald Turning, a former borough of Tinton Falls police chief, went before the board Aug. 7 to raise the alarm about Hance and Sycamore avenues, a “T” intersection that “is no longer just dangerous, it is deadly,” he said. Gary Baldwin, Tinton Falls Council president, said Aug. 13 that police have yet to release their official report on the collision, so details about the victims’ ages and names and how the accident happened have not been disclosed. Yet he felt the July 19 crash should serve as a call to action for the intersection to be made safer. “They want something in writing and we’re not prepared to put anything in writing on that, because it’s not our road,” Baldwin said. “It’s their decision.” Baldwin said Tinton Falls is waiting on a final report from the county saying it had explored all possible alternatives to make the intersection safer and a final recommendation for improving the intersection. Baldwin said he favors a traffic light with added turning lanes.center_img Tinton Falls Mayor Vito Perillo could not be reached for comment. But so far, the county has not moved forward on the suggested improvements outlined in last year’s report. That’s because the county follows a policy of first getting the consent of the governing body of the municipality before moving ahead with intersection projects that affect a municipal road. County officials have worked with Tinton Falls to find alternatives for improving safety. They eliminated the shoulder on the eastbound lane of Sycamore as part of a study to see if crashes would be reduced for 12 months. County engineer Joseph M. Ettore said during last week’s meeting that Tinton Falls Police have provided the county with crash reports. Former Monmouth freeholder and Middletown mayor Frank Self, now a resident of Tinton Falls, also was at the freeholder meeting on the issue. Now the acting president of the Greenbriar Falls Condo Association on Hance Avenue, he sought answers from freeholders on what the county plans to do. The “ticking time bomb” at Hance and Sycamore “is still ticking,” he added. “People are dying. This can’t continue to happen.” He said further that only a small length of Sycamore would be five lanes wide; four of them would be for vehicular traffic, while the fifth would be to safely align the lanes. In another step, the county studied the 40 mph speed limit of Sycamore and found it was the correct limit, based on the speeds of most drivers using the county road. In addition, the county got permission from a property owner on Sycamore, where there is a bend in the road, to remove trees that were hindering motorists’ sight lines. In an inter view after the meeting, Turning said he’d like to see either Tinton Falls’ governing body back the county’s plans for the intersection or, if that fails, for the county to go ahead with the improvements without local officials’ support. Tinton Falls’ five-member council has not gone along, despite being only one vote shy, according to Turning. Freeholder Director Thomas A. Arnone said Aug. 13 that a traffic light at the intersection was a “definite”andcalledsafety a “top priority.” One of the proposals from the study called for widening Sycamore Avenue, which would mean acquiring small por tions of private property, and installing a traffic signal at the Hance and Sycamore intersection. Another sug- gestion called for extending Hope Road in a move that would require acquiring 3.1 acres of private property. “Maybe it’s time for the county of Monmouth to simply say we’re no longer going to continue with that procedure that we have, that we’re going to wait for a serious problem like this to be fixed for the elected officials of that community or any community to say, ‘yes, it’s OK,’ ” Turning said at last week’s freeholders meeting. Current Tinton Falls Police Chief John A. Scrivanic could not be reached for comment about the crash. “There’s been more accidents at that intersection than you can shake a stick at over the years,” he said. “But the greater good is simple. You can’t have people being injured in car accidents at an intersection that you know is a failure.”last_img read more

Marsh rink makes most of second chance to capture Kootenay Dominion Curling Club Championship

first_imgBarry Marsh is not known for taking the easy route to glory.No this Nelson skip always likes to have the plot thicken before tasting victory as he did Sunday at the Heritage City Curling Club.Marsh, third John Rampone, second Cameron Shaw and lead Al May needed an extra game before capturing the Kootenay Dominion Curling Club Championship with an 11-3 victory over Ivor Larsen of Kimberley.The Nelson rink now advances to represent the Kootenay Zone at the Dominion Curling Club Championship next month in Richmond. After dominating the A event, winning the title in easy fashion, Marsh hit a bump in the road when Larsen put together a big end en route to a 10-4 win in the B Final.Having another chance at the Bavarian City rink, Marsh made the most of it as he blasted Larsen in six ends.The Dominion Curling Club Championship is designed to provide club curlers with the opportunity of a lifetime. Teams from both the East and West Kootenays flocked to Nelson to compete in the two-day event.The road to a Canadian Championship started at the beginning of the curling season at the club level.The Kootenay Championship is the next step before the respective winners advance to the provincial tournament April 17-21 in Richmond.On the women’s side of the draw, Desiree Schmidt of Fruitvale won the right to represent the Kootenays in Richmond.last_img read more