Majority of US firms in Hong Kong concerned about security law: Amcham

first_imgThe Amcham survey, published on Monday and to which 183 or 15 percent of its members responded on July 6-9, showed 36.6 percent of respondents were “somewhat” concerned and 51 percent were “extremely concerned” about the legislation.More than two-thirds of the respondents were more concerned than a month ago, when the full details of the law, which came into force just before the anniversary of the former British colony’s return to Chinese rule on July 1, 1997, were unveiled.The legislation, which sees a Chinese intelligence agency openly operating in the city for the first time and gives police and mainland agents broad powers beyond the scrutiny of courts, raises a broad spectrum of worries for US companies.Some 65 percent were concerned about the “ambiguity in its scope and enforcement” and roughly 61 percent were concerned about the independence of Hong Kong’s judicial system. A majority of United States companies in Hong Kong surveyed by the American Chamber of Commerce (Amcham) are concerned about the sweeping new national security law in the global financial hub, with a third looking to move assets or business longer-term.The legislation, which punishes secession subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison, has further strained relations between the United States and China.Read also: Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast ‘protest’ vote against new security laws About half were concerned about the city’s status as a global finance centre and the erosion of the high degree of autonomy it was promised 23 years ago.Read also: ‘We’re next’: Hong Kong security law sends chills through TaiwanOther major concerns cited were data security, talent drain and retaliatory measures by other governments. The prospect of extraditions to mainland China, where courts are controlled by the Communist Party, was considered a “game changer” by about 46 percent, with 17 percent saying it wasn’t.About 49 percent said the law would have a negative impact on their business, while some 13 percent said it would have a positive impact. Some 30 percent considered moving capital, assets or business out of Hong Kong in the medium-to-long term, while 5 percent said they consider doing so in the short-term.More than half of the respondents said they felt less safe about living and working in Hong Kong. Also about half said they personally considered leaving the city.Topics :last_img read more

Gov. Wolf: $20 Million in PAsmart Grants Available to Advance Science and Technology Education

first_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitter Gov. Wolf: $20 Million in PAsmart Grants Available to Advance Science and Technology Education Education,  PAsmart,  Press Release,  Workforce Development Building on the highly successful launch of his PAsmart initiative last year, Governor Tom Wolf today announced up to $20 million in grants are available to prepare students for the fast-growing fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) and computer science (CS).“PAsmart is strategically investing in science and technology education so students get the skills they need for emerging jobs in high demand,” said Governor Wolf. “The grants encourage businesses and schools to develop partnerships that focus education on the knowledge students will need to succeed in growing industries.“Through PAsmart, we are developing the most prepared and talented workforce in the country, which will help students excel, grow the middle class, and strengthen the economy for everyone,” he said.The governor secured $30 million for PAsmart last year and $40 million this year. The Department of Education will award $20 million for STEM and computer science education through PAsmart Targeted Pre-K-12 grants and Advancing grants. The Department of Labor and Industry will soon announce applications for $10 million for apprenticeships and industry partnerships. Funding for career and technical education also increased by $10 million.“Pennsylvania is a national leader for offering innovative computer science and STEM learning, which is critical to ensuring that students are college, career, and community ready when they graduate,” said Secretary of Education Pedro A. Rivera. “PAsmart Targeted and Advancing grants help train educators to provide high-quality STEM and CS experiences in their classrooms. They also promote community partnerships to ensure all students of all ages, including those who are historically underserved and underrepresented, receive STEM and CS education.”PAsmart Targeted PreK-12 grants, of up to $35,000 each, are structured to meet the needs of local education agencies (LEAs) and their schools that have limited to no computer science offerings and did not receive targeted grants in 2018-19. These grants are used to help schools introduce and expand computer science programming and to provide educators from pre-kindergarten through grade 12 with training and professional development to teach CS. The Targeted grants also provide greater opportunities for students of color, low-income students and girls to learn critical skills needed to succeed in today’s workforce.PAsmart Advancing grants, of up to $500,000 each, support cross-sector partnerships that provide quality STEM and CS experiences to learners of all ages – early childhood, PreK-12, postsecondary, and adult learners – as part of high-level strategic approaches to workforce readiness. The grants enable regions to expand STEM ecosystems; grow partnerships between LEAs, postsecondary institutions and businesses; expand CS/STEM opportunities to historically underserved populations; and expand the pool of CS/STEM educators at all levels of education.The deadline for submitting Targeted grant applications to PDE is Friday, December 20, 2019Advancing grant applications must be submitted to PDE by Friday, January 10, 2020.Grant applications and additional information is available on the PDE website.center_img November 25, 2019last_img read more