Joe Biden Launches PoliticalIssues Video Series With ATTN Ahead of 2018 Midterms

first_imgFormer Vice President Joe Biden is looking to spur young Americans to vote in the 2018 U.S. midterm elections with an issues-oriented series produced by digital-media startup ATTN:Biden is hosting the 10-episode short-form series “Here’s the Deal,” which will present his take on a range of issues including health care, jobs, education, and gun violence.ATTN: and Biden will launch the first episode this Wednesday (Sept. 12) on Instagram’s IGTV, with subsequent installments to be released weekly. After an exclusive 24-hour window on IGTV, episodes will be distributed on Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube across ATTN: and Biden’s accounts.Biden last week launched his own personal Instagram account (@joebiden) and has amassed 1 million followers.“These days there’s a lot of fluff and misinformation to distract us from the real issues,” Biden says in a trailer for the new series. “That’s why I am partnering with ATTN: on IGTV to break down the issues we all should be voting on this fall. Not complicated policy wonk language or confusing acronyms — just facts.” Popular on Variety Biden’s “Here’s the Deal” is the first IGTV series hosted by a national U.S. politician. ATTN:, which is financing the production, does not plan to run any ads or sponsor hips with the series.Matthew Segal, ATTN:’s co-founder, has previously interviewed the 47th Vice President of the United States — who served for eight years under President Obama — and had a relationship with Biden’s team that led to the new project. Segal said in a statement, “We are honored that Vice President Joe Biden has partnered with ATTN: on this series and are excited to take it to IGTV where we can make a real impact with voters that Washington politicians often overlook.”L.A.-based ATTN:, founded in 2014, has raised about $24 million from investors including Evolution Media Capital, Main Street Advisors, Marc Rowan and Paul Wachter.center_img ×Actors Reveal Their Favorite Disney PrincessesSeveral actors, like Daisy Ridley, Awkwafina, Jeff Goldblum and Gina Rodriguez, reveal their favorite Disney princesses. Rapunzel, Mulan, Ariel,Tiana, Sleeping Beauty and Jasmine all got some love from the Disney stars.More VideosVolume 0%Press shift question mark to access a list of keyboard shortcutsKeyboard Shortcutsplay/pauseincrease volumedecrease volumeseek forwardsseek backwardstoggle captionstoggle fullscreenmute/unmuteseek to %SPACE↑↓→←cfm0-9Next UpJennifer Lopez Shares How She Became a Mogul04:350.5x1x1.25×1.5x2xLive00:0002:1502:15last_img read more

Fish found to communicate with one another using urine

first_img Prior research has shown that some species of animals use urine as a means to communicate with one another. In this new effort, the researchers sought to learn if fish might also do so, because it seemed logical—they are not able to speak and could easily transmit chemicals through water via urine.To find out, they inserted a partition in the middle of a fish tank that prevented fish on either side from interacting physically with one another. In some scenarios, the barrier had tiny holes to allow water to pass between the sides, while in others it did not. Also, some barriers were opaque and others were transparent. In addition, the researchers injected the fish with a blue dye that allowed them to see and measure urine being expelled by the fish once in the tank.The researchers measured how much urine was expelled under a variety of situations—in which only one fish was in the tank; in which there were two but they could not see each other; in which there were two and they could see each other but were or were not able to communicate via urine through the barrier—the team also used a variety of fish sizes and noted fish behavior throughout each test.The researchers looked at their results and noted that when two fish saw one another in the tank, they raised their fins and approached each other in an aggressive manner, and both emitted more urine than when they were not able to see another fish. Also, they found that only when the urine was allowed to move through the barrier was there a noticeable change in behavior of the fish—in such cases, the smaller fish generally reduced its aggressiveness, yielding to the larger one. Interestingly, the researchers also noted that when the urine was not able to pass through the barrier and the fish were able to see one another, both emitted more urine than in any other scenario, apparently aware that their message was not getting through. (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers with the University of Bern in Switzerland has found that at least one species of fish communicates with others of its kind using chemicals in its urine. In their paper published in the journal Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, the team outlines experiments they conducted with a cichlid fish and what they discovered. Neolamprologus pulcher. Credit: Guérin Nicolas/Wikipedia Citation: Fish found to communicate with one another using urine (2017, February 2) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2017-02-fish-urine.html Journal information: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology More information: Dario-Marcos Bayani et al. To pee or not to pee: urine signals mediate aggressive interactions in the cooperatively breeding cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher, Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology (2017). DOI: 10.1007/s00265-016-2260-6AbstractThe communication of aggressive propensity is an important component of agonistic interactions. For this purpose, animals use different sensory modalities involving visual, acoustical and chemical cues. While visual and acoustic communication used in aggressive encounters has been studied extensively in a wide range of taxa, the role of chemical communication received less attention. Here, we studied the role of chemical cues used during agonistic interactions of territory owners in the cooperative cichlid Neolamprologus pulcher. During staged encounters, we allowed either visual and chemical contact between two contestants or visual contact only. As chemical information in this species is most likely transferred via urine, we measured urination patterns using dye injections. Furthermore, we recorded aggressive and submissive behaviours of both contestants in response to the experimental treatment. Fish that had only visual contact with each other significantly increased their urination frequency and showed more aggressive displays compared to fish with both visual and chemical contact. Furthermore, appropriate agonistic responses appear to be dependent on available chemical information. This indicates that N. pulcher actively emits chemical signals to communicate their aggressive propensity via urine. Chemical communication thus plays a crucial role in multimodal communication of aggression in these fish, which highlights the need of studying the role of chemical communication during agonistic encounters in general, even if other signals are more obvious to the human observer.center_img Explore further © 2017 Phys.org Tokyo aquarium baffled by mystery fish deaths This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more