A Response to Subcompact Publishing

first_imgSo why do so many of our digital magazines publish on the same schedule, with the same number of articles as their print counterparts? Using the same covers? Of course, they do because it’s easier to maintain identical schedules across mediums. To not design twice. To not test twice (or, at all).Unfortunately—from a medium-specific user experience point of view—it’s almost impossible to produce a digitally indigenous magazine beholden to those legacy constraints. Why? Not least because we use tablets and smartphones very differently than we use printed publications.The key here, for Mod, is the “indigenous magazine”—a product born exclusively for the mobile-digital platform, free of any print production and pricing frameworks. He goes on to highlight The Magazine, created by Marco Arment, as a perfect example of the digitally indigenous magazine. It’s short (four or five articles), it’s design is breezy and open, it’s file size is small, it’s cheap and easy to snack on.This all may be true, and there’s probably an audience for The Magazine and future brands just like it. But what’s wrong with publishing a tablet magazine that’s full of print magazine design and rich media content, that’s $4.99 for a single copy and might take all night to download to Apple’s Newsstand? Nothing, really, because there’s room in the market for the digitally indigenous magazine and the digital magazine that’s married, for good or bad, to its print namesake. I understand that with digital comes an expectation of disruption and re-invention. And not just an expectation, but actual disruption. But it’s also a world where all sorts of business models live and play.I don’t think Mod is necessarily saying all publishers need to drop their old-school, print-legacy-based digital magazines and start producing $2, 4-article, scrolling mini-apps. He does say though, that publishers are balking at producing products like these because they’re not based on a familiar model and they’re not likely to produce immediate and significant returns. Funnily enough, neither have the full-blown tablet magazines, for now. What will be interesting to see is how much the subcompact model informs or influences the sedan version of digital magazines—or simply rides next to it. An essay by Craig Mod has been making the rounds lately among media watchers. It’s a terrific read. Mod, a current independent writer and former Flipbook employee, touts what he’s calling the Subcompact Manifesto, which places a premium on a minimalist approach to digital publishing. His manifesto emerges out of one of the main criticisms ‘traditional’ publishers have received for their tablet magazines and apps: They’re unwieldy, hard to use, have too many bells and whistles and take up too much room. But most importantly, they’re tied to print production schedules, design and pricing. In other words, tablet editions are not exploiting the medium in the open, nimble, socially-forward way they could and/or should be.As Mod says: last_img read more

Tom Cruises daughter makes new revelations on Church of Scientology

first_imgFile photo shows Katie Holmes walking with her husband Tom Cruise and their daughter Suri in New York.ReutersTom Cruise and his family usually stay quiet when it comes to their association with the Church of Scientology but earlier this week, Cruise’s daughter has finally broken her silence about Cruise’s ties with the controversial church.Many fans of Tom Cruise think that the Mission: Impossible movie star has only one daughter — Suri Cruise from his marriage with Katie Holmes. But as it turned out, Cruise has two more children from his previous marriage. From his marriage to Nicole Kidman, Tom fathered Isabella Jane and Connor Antony. Isabella has now gone public about Cruise’s ties with the Church of Scientology.As many of us know, Tom Cruise’s daughter Isabella is reportedly a Scientologist. In Tony Ortega’s (famous blogger who is known for writing about the Church of Scientology) website, The Underground Bunker, Isabella has talked about the Church and how its leader, David Miscavige has saved her.As per Tony Ortega’s blog, the 27-year-old Isabella talks about her experiences. The promo is reportedly aimed at getting Scientologist to do an internship to become an auditor at the Church’s London branch.”I became that annoying girl in the org who would just talk endlessly about how incredible training is and how phenomenal the internship is. We all need to do this. It’s hard work…but it is worth everything because you will get through.” Actor Tom Cruise and his wife Nicole Kidman embrace each other at the Sydney premiere of ‘Mission Impossible 2’ May 30, 2000 at Fox Studios in Australia.Matt Turner/LiaisonFollowing this, she thanked her father, Tom Cruise’s beliefs and even acknowledged him and his sister, Cass Mapother.”Thank you to my Dad for everything. To Cass. To Tash. I would have drowned in my own problems if you hadn’t been there to sup me or get me through the preliminaries.”Isabella ended her message by thanking David Miscavige and late Scientologist founder, L. Ron Hubbard. You can check the entire message at Ortega’s blog.Meanwhile, Tony Ortega also revealed that Tom Cruise has recently attended the latest major Scientology event in Florida. It was L. Ron Hubbard’s birthday event and for the Scientologists it is considered the holiest day.Besides this, Tom Cruise’s former wife Katie Holmes has not commented on anything when it comes to the Church of Scientology. Ever since her divorce, she has remained quiet and focused on her daughter, Suri Cruise. Katie is reportedly dating Tom’s former friend Jamie Foxx.last_img read more

Two decades of a Mistresspiece

first_imgRoughly 21 years back, a younger Nasreen had written, ‘In the name of religion, there has been bloodshed, disturbance and persecution.’ It was then, in 1993, that her celebrated novel Lajja was first published in Bengali. Bangladesh banned it soon after, condemning her to an exile that she has been fighting ever since. It’s been 20 years of Lajja, and Nasreen’s struggle for survival – literary, political, womanly. Marking the 20th anniversary of this seminal text, a fresh translation into English has been published by Penguin recently. Nasreen, who lives in South Delhi and often spends her evenings buying fish from Chittaranjan Park, couldn’t be happier. Her visa has been recently extended by the Indian government for another year. It’s a permanent battle as far as her domicile is concerned, but she’s not afraid to wage it. Bengal is out of bounds: fanatics want her head. But in the relative secular seclusion of South Delhi, Nasreen drowns her sorrows in a late night peg, snuggling along her cat Minoo. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Lajja came right in the heels of Babri Masjid demolition in Ayodhya. On 6 December 1992, RSS karsevaks brought down the 500-year-old mosque in the contested Ram Janmabhoomi, and the shadow of that historic tragedy fell on neighbouring Bangladesh. Lajja charted how the raging fire of communal anger swept through Dhaka as a Hindu family bore the brunt of the manic event. Translated by activist-turned-writer Anchita Ghatak, the new edition comes with updates. ‘This is like a documentary novel. There are fictional characters but is based on facts. Lajja has been a bestseller for a very long time. It has been published and translated in almost all Indian languages and also many foreign languages like French, German, Italian, Spanish, Dutch, etc,’ Nasreen was heard saying at the book launch. She has been dubbed ‘anti-Islamic’ by fringe lunatics of Bangladesh, particularly those hobnobbing with the Khaleda Zia-led Bangladesh Nationalist Party and the Jamaat. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixShe wears it as a badge of honour, flaunting her atheism while declaring compassion for those in Gaza, Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Afghanistan, Pakistan and of course Bangladesh.  She says her support was for the late Maqbool Fida Hussain, who was compelled to spend his last days in Qatar. She openly bats for Iranian bloggers who took on the neurotic Ahmedinejad.  Her other works such as Dwikhondito, Amar Meyebela, among others have been subjects of controversy. But her quips are often littered with seething irony: ‘If you don’t hurt people’s sentiments, you don’t need freedom of expression.’ Between The Covers is a weekly column on reading up and rating downlast_img read more

Everything agents have to deal with in one hilarious video

first_imgLife of a travel agent! ? ?Posted by Christian Hull on Monday, April 24, 2017 Posted by SYDNEY — Only a fellow travel agent will understand the many hardships of the job. From crazy customer complaints to over-the-top demands to putting together a complicated itinerary only for the customer to end up booking online themselves, being a travel agent in this day and age is no walk in the park.But when the going gets tough, the tough gets going, which according to online personality Christian Hull is best done through a mock video that highlights all the crazy issues agents face on a daily basis. Sporting a wig and posing as a fictitious travel agent, Hull hilariously depicts several scenarios between agents and customers that often leave the former feeling frustrated, slighted or downright confused.And with Travel Agent Day in Canada coming up on May 3, the video is a delightful reminder of just how hard agents work every single day. We salute you!Watch the video here: << Previous PostNext Post >> Everything agents have to deal with in one hilarious videocenter_img Travelweek Group Tags: LOL, Video Friday, April 28, 2017 last_img read more