Lions Suh May Receive Another NFL Fine

It’s getting to the point where the NFL appears to be singling out Detroit Lions’ player Ndamukong Suh for scrutiny, as the defensive tackle is facing yet another potential fine.The NFL is currently reviewing Suh’s play against the Cleveland Browns in Sunday’s game. Suh appeared to lead with his helmet when he hit Browns quarterback Brandon Weeden.The hit happened after the QB let go the ball but it wasn’t penalized. After the play was shown on video posted on nfl.com Tuesday, the vice president of officiating, Dean Blandino said, “Why don’t we look at it some more?” indicating that they may change the call.Suh, who has a heap of fines on his resume, was fined $100,000 earlier in the year for an illegal block on Minnesota Vikings center John Sullivan in Week 1. He appealed the penalty, but lost last week. That payment was the largest fine in NFL history for an on-field conduct issue. read more

From jobs to economy Whats on next governments bucket list

first_imgA supporter of ruling Bharatiya Janata Party waves the party flag during an election campaign rally being addressed by India’s Prime Minister Narendra Modi in New Delhi.ReutersExit polls after the end of India’s general election on Sunday showed Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) and its allies retaining power with an overwhelming majority.The Hindu nationalist leader will need to tackle a host of issues ranging from unemployment to weak economic growth:JOBSCreating work for an estimated 1.2 million young people entering the market each month will be a key challenge. Economists say the next prime minister will need to encourage businesses to step up investment to create job opportunities.Unemployment rose to 7.6% in April, the highest since October 2016, and up from 6.71% in March, data from private think-tank the Centre for Monitoring Indian Economy showed.An official survey that was withheld by the government showed India’s unemployment rate rose to 6.1%, the highest level in at least 45 years, in 2017/18, the Business Standard newspaper reported in January.ECONOMYEconomic growth, which hit a five-quarter low of 6.6% in October-December, appears to be slowing further. Car and motorbike sales have tumbled and industrial output contracted for the first time in nearly two years in March. Rural demand and manufacturing growth have also weakened.Economists have also questioned the quality of the official economic data, saying the on-the-ground situation is far bleaker.The new government will have limited options to boost the economy given the prevalent revenue constraints – it may need to rework its expenditure plans and deploy more funds to schemes that can help boost weak consumption in rural areas.The government will also need support through rate cuts and liquidity measures from the Reserve Bank of India to help bring down the cost of funds for banks and make loans cheaper for consumers.TRADEIndia’s trade relationship with major partners, including the United States and China, remains on a shaky footing.US President Donald Trump’s administration has called out India on its high tariffs, price caps on imported US medical devices and rules around e-commerce trade.Indian government officials say they fear Trump’s administration will soon end preferential trade treatment for India, which allows duty-free entry for up to $5.6 billion worth of its exports to the United States.Adding to India’s troubles is the ongoing trade dispute between the United States and China, which is likely to benefit countries such as Japan and South Korea. India remains vulnerable to the dumping of cheap Chinese imports.PAKISTANNational security issues and relations with arch-rival Pakistan will be high on the agenda. The tension between the nuclear-armed neighbours has been high after Modi this year sent warplanes into Pakistan to avenge the killing of 40 Indian police officers in a militant attack which was claimed by a Pakistan-based group.In recent weeks, Pakistani leaders have suggested that they are tired of conflict, opposed to extremism and open to peace talks with India, but those offers have been met with scepticism.India is steadfast in its demand that Islamabad stops its support for militant groups, particularly those operating in the disputed Kashmir region, and has said it isn’t open to talks until then.RELIGIONAllies of Modi’s BJP will likely renew their controversial demand to build a Hindu temple on the ruins of a 16th-century mosque in the northern town of Ayodhya.A violent Hindu mob destroyed the mosque in Ayodhya in 1992, triggering riots that killed about 2,000 people in one of the worst episodes of sectarian violence since independence from colonial rule in 1947.India’s Supreme Court has set up a panel to arbitrate the decades-long dispute.Modi could also end the special constitutional status given to India’s only Muslim-majority state, Jammu and Kashmir, as the BJP believes the status prevents outsiders from buying property there and hinders its integration with the rest of India.last_img read more

Tonight AFROs First Edition with Sean Yoes Friday February 5

first_imgListen at WEAA Live Stream: http://amber.streamguys.com.4020/live.m3uA review of some of this week’s top news stories from the pages of the AFRO, with managing editor Kamau High. Plus, our recurring guests Taya Graham and Stephen Janis (The Mod Squad) of The Real News Network, report on law enforcement and politics, including this week’s developments in the race for mayor of Baltimore.These stories and more coming up this evening on AFRO’s First Edition with Sean Yoes.last_img

Perfectionism in youngsters significantly increased

first_imgPerfectionism – the craving to be perfect in body, mind and career – has significantly increased among today’s college students compared with previous generations, and may be taking a toll on their mental health, a study suggests. Researchers suggest that perfectionism entails “an irrational desire to achieve along with being overly critical of oneself and others.”They analysed data from 41,641 American, Canadian and British college students from 164 samples who completed the Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, a test for generational changes in perfectionism, from the late 1980s to 2016. They measured three types of perfectionism: self-oriented – an irrational desire to be perfect; socially prescribed – perceiving excessive expectations from others; and other-oriented – placing unrealistic standards on others. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfThe study, published in the journal Psychological Bulletin, found that more recent generations of college students reported significantly higher scores for each form of perfectionism than earlier generations.The rise in perfectionism among millennials is being driven by a number of factors, according to Curran. For example, raw data suggest that social media use pressures young adults to perfect themselves in comparison to others, which makes them dissatisfied with their bodies and increases social isolation.The drive to earn money, pressure to get a good education and setting lofty career goals are other areas in which today’s young people exhibit perfectionism.In another example, Curran cited college students’ drive to perfect their grades and compare them to their peers. These examples represent a rise in meritocracy among millennials, in which universities encourage competition among students to move up the ladder.last_img read more