Peruvian Peace Corps Learns to Prevent Tropical Diseases

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo January 17, 2019 The Peruvian Armed Forces’ Joint Command (CCFFAA, in Spanish) concluded 2018 with the inauguration of a health education and prevention course for members of peacekeeping operations. The Tropical Diseases course, conducted with the support of the U.S. Embassy in Lima, gathered 60 units of the Peruvian, Colombian, and Salvadoran armed forces. The objective of the course was to analyze tropical diseases that threaten service members deployed in peacekeeping missions. The course also sought to provide better knowledge on how to prevent endemic infectious diseases, such as dengue, zika, yellow fever, hemorrhagic fevers, and monkeypox, among others, with greater emphasis on malaria. The course was taught with the support of the U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group and the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Institute for Medical Operations (DIMO). Four instructors taught the course under the leadership of U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jessica Cowden, chief of infectious disease programs. The loss of a Peruvian blue helmet deployed with the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA, in French) prompted the creation of the course. “It was a very tough lesson learned that warned us about the risks and, above all, how it was addressed,” Peruvian Navy Petty Officer Second Class Edsson Evaristo Alvarado, CCFFAA analyst on peacekeeping operations and course organizer, told Diálogo. “It was in 2014 in Africa, where ebola was taking its toll, so they treated [the blue helmet] as if it were that disease. He was quarantined, and instead of treating him for malaria, they treated him for ebola, and he died.” Preventing illnesses The five-day course was divided into two phases. During the initial theoretical phase, DIMO’s instructors shared their knowledge and experiences. They focused on preventing malaria, chemoprophylaxis—the use of medication to prevent a disease—severe malaria, malaria surveillance programs; and the history, transmission, and detection of the Ebola virus and monkeypox. Instructors also addressed diseases transmitted through food and the sanitary conditions of dining areas. With the topics covered, they sought to promote prevention among military personnel deployed in peacekeeping missions. “The idea is to prevent diseases, and doing research before going on a [peacekeeping] mission,” Peruvian Air Force Petty Officer Second Class Jacqueline Galarza López, who participated in the course before deploying to MINUSCA, told Diálogo. “We attend talks at the Peruvian Training and Instruction Center for Peacekeeping Operations, but in this seminar we saw instructions, experiences, and medical processes that take place upon return.” The second phase, the hands-on part, required students’ active participation to conduct malaria diagnostic tests and blood sample observation under microscopes, among other procedures. “The U.S. personnel taught us how to do the tests and how to immunize uniforms, and they gave us clothes for the contingent that’s about to travel,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Galarza. A benefit for the region In addition to the Peruvian units to be deployed in January or February of 2019 to join the peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, military health corps members also took part in the course. According to Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado, Colombian and Salvadoran personnel were invited to learn and share their experience. “We convened the medical personnel from military institutions who deal with health issues of the personnel that takes part in peacekeeping operations, the nurse that administers vaccines, the doctor who provides medical certificates, and those who deal with epidemic issues in each institution, among others,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado said. “Participants included personnel we offered to the UN who have already been accepted.” With its own experience in the field and the support of U.S. experts, Peru’s CCFFAA seeks to improve deployments and protect the health of its units in peacekeeping missions. When taught again, the course will be beneficial to regional partner nations that want to increase their participation in peacekeeping missions in countries prone to infectious diseases. “Most importantly, during the course we realized that we are pioneers in South America in teaching it,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado concluded. “We learned and presented new things, and we expect to cover more at the national level. The service member leaves, but it’s a human being who returns, potentially bringing back an epidemic element.”last_img read more

Cricket News Marnus Labuschagne – A case to be studied

first_imgNew Delhi : Let’s write about Marnus Labuschagne today. Let’s write about him tomorrow. Let’s not forget to write about him a day after. Marnus Labuschagne has set some standards in his initial days of International cricket after the innings he played under pressure in second Ashes Test against England.Imagine a Test match going and as the manager’s hands the team sheet – your name isn’t there. This means, you have been asked to start on the bench and serve water as and when required by on-field players. Now, while you’re in non-match mood, you get to know that you need to play as Steve Smith, who smashed two centuries and 92 in three innings was hit by a bouncer by Jofra Archer.Becoming the first-ever batsman to be concussion replacement, Labuschagne smashed a gritty 59 as Australia survived to claim a draw and preserve their 1-0 series lead.If that wasn’t enough, on Tuesday morning – not more than an hour after Smith was ruled out of this week’s third Test – Labuschagne was hit square in the grille by a Mitchell Starc snorter while batting in the nets, requiring medical attention for the second time in the space of four days.Just as he did at Lord’s, Labuschagne waved the medics away, insisting he was fine.Needing 288 to avoid an innings defeat by Lancashire, the Welsh county were skittled for 138, losing inside three days. But the fact that they remain third in the Division Two table owes much to their 25-year-old Australian overseas player with the unpronounceable name who smashed a century on his championship debut against Northants and went on to plunder four more before receiving an Ashes call-up from Australia’s selectors.Labuschagne’s 1,114 runs this summer makes him the competition’s leading run-scorer by a distance, and a major reason why a team who finished bottom of Division Two last season are now challenging for promotion to Division One.Labuschagne – The replacement Australia wantedBorn in Klerksdorp, in South Africa’s North West province, Australia’s man of the moment grew up speaking Afrikaans, apparently only becoming proficient in English after his family emigrated to Brisbane when he was 10. It seems he was always fluent with bat and ball, though.A cricket-mad teenager Labuschagne was operating the Hot Spot cameras at the Gabba when Peter Siddle recorded an Ashes hat-trick in the first Test in 2010. He played for Queensland at under-12, under-15, under-17, and under-19 level, and for Redlands Tigers in grade cricket.It was actually through the Redlands connection that Glamorgan signed him.Labuschagne had already made his Test debut by then, of course, so he wasn’t a complete unknown. Called up for Australia’s series against Pakistan in the UAE last year, he made a duck in Dubai before scoring 25 and 43 in the second Test in Abu Dhabi. It was his fielding and leg-spin which drew greater attention, Labuschagne taking 3-45 with the ball and producing one particularly smart catch at short leg to dismiss Mohammad Hafeez.It was not enough to secure him a central contract with Cricket Australia, though, opening the door to Glamorgan. Their gamble paid off in spades.Australia will hope Labuschagne’s bountiful summer does not end now. He has produced to be an exceptional player who has adapted to the conditions well and taken pressure off the experienced campaigners at this age. Being the first choice for that middle-order spot in the next Test, Labuschagne will look to grab the opportunity with both hands. And if he can replicate last game heroics again, he may well prove to be the difference between two sides.What will Labuschagne become or not, who knows till then, stay with those timely inside out cover drives and pulls in front of square. Sometimes, a cricketer is just about his cricket. And there’s no nickname needed. For all the Latest Sports News News, Cricket News News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps.last_img read more