History of Vermont Printers Now Available

first_imgThe Lane Press, Inc. announced the availability of the book A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 – 2004. Published by Lane Press to recognize Vermont printers and to commemorate its 100th anniversary, the book features interviews of 20 prominent contributors to the states printing industry, a history of printing techniques, and the changing role of technology during this time. Putting ink on paper is one of the central acts of a civilized society, the book begins. For private messages, a pen will do. But for spreading public informationanything from advertising to sacred textsprinting has long been the medium that has joined the individuals in a culture.How important is printing to the Vermont economy? Today there are 119 commercial printing businesses that employ more than 3,600 people with sales of more than half a billion dollars.Authored by Chris Granstrom with oral histories by The Vermont Folklife Center and photography by Michael Sipe, the book is a compilation of stories and images that bring to life the important role printers play in the dissemination of information, our ideals, and the freedoms we enjoy as a result of the printing industry.In the preface of the book, Philip Drumheller, president of Lane Press, says that more than anything else, this is a people story. This is a story about families, fathers and sons, and a lot of great individuals, lively characters who make the story of printing in Vermont both appealing and engaging. The oral history interviews with noted printing professionals bring the printing history alive through the stories they tell.Rocky Stinehour, founder of Stinehour Press in Lunenburg, Vermont, spoke at length during his oral history interview about the role of technology in printing. Printing has always been a technologically driven business, right from the get-go. I mean, putting those scribes out of business that were making those beautiful handmade books. There were books long before printing came along, and beautiful books, and great books, but printing did something. Printing was a tool and it took pens out of the hands of the scribes and they had to start setting type. The technology may change, but the book remains.A Celebration of Vermont Printers 1904 2004 is available in hard and soft cover at www.lanepress.com(link is external).last_img read more

Caribbean countries could receive less funding for projects -CDF

first_imgBarbados, CMC – The Barbados-based Caribbean Development Fund (CDF) says regional countries could receive less funding for projects in the future because some countries have not been meeting their financial obligations.“We have enough resources to continue the programs that we have already agreed to. However, if we do not get all of the subscriptions that were due in the second cycle, there is a possibility that we may need to scale down operations, not projects that are discussed, but scale down new projects that will be anticipated for 2020. We are hoping that this will not be the case,” said the chairman of the CDF board of directors, Dr Sherwyn Williams.In addition, Williams told reporters on the side-lines of the CDF’s seventh annual meeting of contributors and development partners, that the fund, established to provide financial and technical assistance to disadvantaged countries in the Caribbean Community (CARICOM) could scale back if owing member states did not meet their financial obligations to the CDF for the second funding cycle.During 2017 the CDF received contributions from two member states, St Kitts and Nevis and Belize, completing their second cycle commitment, while the outstanding balance was received from Jamaica.As at December 31, 2017, total fund balance was US$122.42 million or two per cent above that reported for 2016. This increase reflected payments from the three member states which brought the net contribution to US$109.42 million at the end of 2017.Fund owed over US$57 million Last year the CDF was owed a total of US$57.2 million, with Trinidad and Tobago owing US$40 million and Barbados US$7.4 million.For 2017, St Lucia, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, St Kitts and Nevis, Guyana, Dominica, and Grenada benefited from the fund as 17 disbursements of loans and grants totaling US$4.27 million and US$5.01 million, respectively, were made during the reporting period.The CDF said that total disbursement of US$9.28 million in 2017 was 28 per cent higher than the previous year. In line with this performance, the loan portfolio recorded another year of growth at eight per cent from US$23.6 million in 2016 to US$25.71 million last year.The fund has undisbursed balance of US$7.3 million in its coffers as at December 31, 2017.Payments are still too slowCDF chief executive officer, Rodinald Soomer said the response from member states in relation to their payments was not what the fund expected, indicating that they were still too slow in meeting their obligations.He did not name the countries but indicated that there were four member states still in arrears. But he said given the financial situation facing the region, the CDF was taking a new approach in seeking payment.Soomer  said that the CDF was perhaps not the only regional institution having challenges in getting member countries to pay their dues, and that the Guyana-based CARICOM Secretariat was working on a system to ensure for automaticity of financing for regional institutions.last_img read more