Jadon Sancho and…? Chelsea’s January Wishlist Revealed If Transfer Ban is Lifted

first_img banBen ChilwellchelseaDavid Luiz First Published: November 5, 2019, 2:27 PM IST Chelsea’s appeal against a transfer ban by FIFA for breaking rules to sign youth players from abroad will be heard on November 20 at the Court of Arbitration for Sport.CAS has announced the hearing date on Monday, with a verdict due before the midseason transfer window opens in January. Chelsea already served half of its one-year ban on registering new players during the summer transfer window.The club did not seek to freeze the FIFA sanction while preparing the appeal to CAS.FIFA’s disciplinary and appeal committees have said Chelsea violated 150 rules protecting minors from trafficking. Those cases involved about 70 players.Chelsea was also judged to break rules prohibiting third-party influence on players. FIFA imposed a fine of 600,000 Swiss francs ($608,000). The club has denied wrongdoing.Chelsea manager Frank Lampard though, according to reports in the English media, is already lining up potential transfers he can make in the January window.”Chelsea will always look to improve in transfer windows if we can – and if the players we might look at are better or we feel are adding to the squad,” Lampard said ahead of Chelsea’s UEFA Champions League clash with Ajax.”I’m very interested in the appeal of course because it’s obviously going to affect potentially what we can do in January or not. Of course, some players have come in and shown with their opportunities they’ve been given that they can do roles and play well. We are getting results at the moment,” he added.With the departures of Eden Hazard and David Luiz, coupled with the uncertain futures of Pedro, Olivier Giroud and Willian, Chelsea is lining up a few moves.Reports suggest that Borussia Dortmund’s English striker Jadon Sancho is top of the list, along with Crystal Palace’s Wilfried Zaha and Lyon’s Moussa Dembele.Chelsea will also be on the lookout for defensive reinforcements, Leicester City Ben Chilwell and Bournemouth’s Nathan Ake being potential targets.(With inputs from Agencies) Get the best of News18 delivered to your inbox – subscribe to News18 Daybreak. Follow News18.com on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Telegram, TikTok and on YouTube, and stay in the know with what’s happening in the world around you – in real time.last_img read more

PEP Will Help Tailor Learning to Meet Students’ Needs – Senator Reid

first_img “Our intention in this reform of the exit exam, coming out of the primary system, is largely to ensure that we are better preparing our students for the next level of the education system, which is the secondary system. We want every student to have the opportunity to go right up to grade 13 and forward to university,” he added. Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, says the Primary Exit Profile (PEP), scheduled to commence in the 2018/2019 academic year, will help to tailor learning to meet the needs of all students, particularly those with special requirements. Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Senator the Hon. Ruel Reid, says the Primary Exit Profile (PEP), scheduled to commence in the 2018/2019 academic year, will help to tailor learning to meet the needs of all students, particularly those with special requirements.“The profile [PEP] will allow us to identify the strengths and weaknesses of our students, and so we can customise our teaching and learning strategies… . So it’s going to be a very holistic, inclusive-type education system dealing with special needs as well as exceptional students. We can take care of those at the very top and those who are in need of support at the bottom,” Mr. Reid said.“Our intention in this reform of the exit exam, coming out of the primary system, is largely to ensure that we are better preparing our students for the next level of the education system, which is the secondary system. We want every student to have the opportunity to go right up to grade 13 and forward to university,” he added.Senator Reid was speaking at the final PEP town hall for the year held on December 19 at the Karl Hendrickson Auditorium at Jamaica College in St. Andrew.PEP, which will replace the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) as the national secondary school entrance test, is intended to provide a better and more complete profile of students’ academic and critical-thinking capabilities at the end of primary-level education.It comprises a Performance Task Test, Ability Task Test and a Curriculum-Based Test.PEP will be rolled out on a phased basis beginning in September 2018, with students who are now in grade five to be the first cohort. They will do only the Grade Six components in 2019.Students who are currently in grade four will do their Grade Five Performance Task in 2019, and in 2020 they will do the Grade Six components.Students who are currently in grade three will be the first cohort that will have a complete profile generated. This means that they will do the Grade Four Performance Task section in 2019, Grade Five Performance Task in 2020 and all Grade Six components in 2021.PEP grades will be made available to schools in the third week of June every year.Minister Reid said PEP will prepare the nation’s children to be critical thinkers with good analytical and problem-solving skills.He said the profile will better align with the objectives of the Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) and Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM).Minister Reid expressed confidence “in the ability of the Ministry based on the systems that we’ve put in place for us to be able to complete all the work (that) we have to do in terms of the final assessments and the final profile.”“I expect a very smooth landing as we commence the roll-out of PEP in 2019,” he said. Story Highlights PEP, which will replace the Grade Six Achievement Test (GSAT) as the national secondary school entrance test, is intended to provide a better and more complete profile of students’ academic and critical-thinking capabilities at the end of primary-level education. last_img read more

Report Hyundai Heavys Union Considering Strike

first_imgzoom The labor union of South Korea’s shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) said that it would launch an industrial action as a response to the company’s plans to split its businesses, according to Yonhap News Agency.The union claims that the latest development in HHI’s plans to reorganize its businesses into six separate companies next year would lead to a sell-off.Namely, under the earlier announced plans, the businesses would be split into shipbuilding-offshore plant-vessel engines, electric and electronics, construction equipment, renewable energy, robotics, and services.Expected to be finalized by the first half of 2017, the move would be conducted as part of the shipbuilder’s self-rescue scheme as HHI aims to increase competitiveness and improve its financial status.After nine quarters of posting losses, Hyundai Heavy Industries returned to black in the first quarter of 2016 when it booked an operating profit of KRW 325.2 billion.The company managed to maintain its earnings streak in the third quarter of the year as it posted a net income of KRW 334.4 billion for the period, while its net income for the first nine months of 2016 jumped to KRW 971.1 billion, compared to a net loss of KRW 985.1 billion seen in the corresponding period a year earlier.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Can Alabama Afford To Lose

Last Saturday, the Mississippi State Bulldogs — ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll, the Coaches Poll and the College Football Playoff committee’s rankings — lost to the Alabama Crimson Tide 25-20. The loss ruined the Bulldogs’ quest for their first undefeated season since 1940, when they went 10-0-1.But under college football’s new playoff system, which will select four teams to contend for the national championship, a late-season loss by a No. 1 team isn’t as devastating as in years past. Mississippi State, for instance, fell only to No. 4 in the committee’s rankings after it lost to Alabama.It’s less clear whether the Bulldogs control their own destiny. They’ll have another chance to impress the committee when they travel to Oxford, Miss., on Nov. 29 to play No. 8 ranked Mississippi. But they probably won’t play in the SEC Championship and could be leapfrogged by a team (such as Baylor or TCU from the Big 12) that runs the table.The permutations can get intense. To forecast a team’s likelihood of making the playoff, you not only have to account for all plausible outcomes of upcoming football games but also how the set of humans who make up the selection committee might react to those different outcomes. We’re in the midst of investigating these questions and will have some results for you soon.But we’ll start, in this article, with a simple cut of the data: What’s happened, historically, to the ranking of No. 1 teams like Mississippi State when they lose? Could Alabama, the new No. 1, remain in the top four if it loses one of its remaining games?Because the playoff committee is new, we’ll be looking at the historical results from the Coaches Poll for guidance. (We figure the Coaches Poll might be a better proxy for the playoff committee than the AP poll since the committee leans heavily on athletic directors and former coaches.) Here are all the teams since 2002 to have lost a game while ranked No. 1 in the Coaches Poll:No. 1s that lost a regular-season game wound up anywhere from No. 4 to No. 10 after their defeats. That shouldn’t give much comfort to Alabama. Mississippi State’s case was unusual; most regular-season losses knock a No. 1 team out of the top four.What accounts for the different outcomes? Well, it’s complicated. The humans voting in the polls are a little forgiving if the loss comes against another ranked opponent. (No. 1s that lost to a ranked opponent fell to No. 6 on average, versus No. 8 for those that lost to unranked teams.) The margin of defeat may matter some as well. The No. 1s that lost regular-season games by the largest margin — Alabama and Ohio State on consecutive weekends in 2010 — fell to No. 8 and No. 10, respectively.Another factor is whether the year features a deep field of contenders. Part of Ohio State’s steep drop in 2010 may have been because there were an unusually high number of undefeated teams ranked just behind them at the time.Human voters have historically been more forgiving of losses in the conference championship: No. 1s to lose there have fallen to only No. 4 on average. That could be good news for Alabama. Still, this is a small sample with just three examples. Furthermore, the playoff committee claims it will put a particular emphasis on conference championship results.As I said, we’ll be making an effort to sort all this out. It will necessarily come with a lot of probabilities and approximations — this is the first year of the new system and we’re not expecting to identify hard-and-fast rules.There is one rule, however, that has almost always been true. It’s a simple one: A team can’t gain ground by losing.The chart, below, shows what happened to teams ranked throughout the top 25 in the Coaches Poll after they lost a game. (In the chart, read the vertical axis to find a team’s original ranking, then scan across to find the red line, which shows the team’s expected ranking after a loss. The dashed line represents what would happen if a team held its previous position.) Of the 1,133 ranked teams to lose since 2002, only 22 retained their original spot in the rankings. And even fewer — just five teams — improved their position in the poll.This may not be a surprising result, but it tells us something about how human voters react to college football outcomes. As I mentioned, the evidence suggests that voters pay some attention to margin of victory. A definitive win might get a little more credit than a narrow one.But what voters almost never do is reward a team because it loses by less than expected. Say, hypothetically, that No. 24 Gotham Tech travels to No. 3 Gotham State’s home stadium and loses on a last-minute field goal despite having been a 17-point underdog. Your esteem for Gotham Tech should probably improve: That’s a much better showing than you really had the right to expect. But a team’s standing in the polls has almost never improved after an outcome like this; the team has just been punished less. (In this respect, human voters seem to behave a lot like our version of NFL Elo ratings, which account for margin of victory but always prioritize a win over a loss by any margin.)Nor do teams seem to be demoted after narrower-than-expected wins. Take the non-hypothetical case of the 1995 Texas A&M Aggies. On Oct. 14 of that year, they won by just 3 points at home against the SMU Mustangs, an awful team that would go 1-10 that year. If there were ever a time to punish a team for a bad win, this was it. But the Aggies held their position at No. 22 in the polls.The next chart shows the data for ranked teams after wins since 2002. There are a few cases where a team lost ground in the Coaches Poll despite winning — but from what we can tell these were mostly cases where a team was leapfrogged by another that won in more impressive fashion. (That happened to Florida State earlier this year, for example.)There are some other interesting characteristics in these charts. After a loss, teams fall more positions in the poll if they are ranked lower to begin with. While No. 1-ranked teams fall five spots, on average, after a loss, teams ranked No. 15 fall eight positions. This may reflect the fact that teams are more closely bunched together toward the bottom of the Top 25 than toward the top, which is what you’d expect if team skill levels abided by a normal distribution.And a ranked team’s position falls more after a loss than it improves after a win. For example, when the No. 10 team wins a game, it improves only to No. 9, on average. But the same team falls to No. 17 after it loses.This is mainly a reflection of the fact that ranked teams are expected to win. A successful college football season is mostly a matter of running the gauntlet and avoiding upsets. The playoff system gives teams more slack, but not much. read more

2019 Lexus LC Inspiration heads to Chicago looking like a Coldplay song

first_img See All Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate can open like French doors Share your voice • Chicago Auto Show 2019 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 2019 Lexus LC Inspiration is all about that yellow Tags Coupes Luxury cars Feb 8 • 2019 Chicago Auto Show recap: Big debuts from Mazda, Toyota, Subaru and more Feb 9 • 2019 Ram 2500 HD gets accessorized with Mopar goodies reading • 2019 Lexus LC Inspiration heads to Chicago looking like a Coldplay songcenter_img Post a comment 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 0 28 Photos Enlarge ImageAnd it was all yellow. Andrew Krok/Roadshow Lexus first introduced its Inspiration Series cars with a Black Panther tie-in, and it followed that with a big, fancy SUV at the LA Auto Show. Now, for the Chicago Auto Show, it has something sportier in the works.Lexus on Wednesday introduced the 2019 LC 500 Inspiration Series, which will make its official debut at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show next week. Like previous Inspiration Series vehicles, the LC 500 version is all about beefing up the style — but this one sports just a bit more flair than the others.The LC 500 Inspiration Series rocks a very bright shade of yellow paint with a metallic finish. 21-inch wheels, a carbon fiber roof and a carbon fiber lower grille insert complement the Flare Yellow paint job. Inside, there are yellow door inserts made from Alcantara suede, and the leather seats sport yellow stitching that extends to the instrument panel, glove box and center console. There’s also a set of carbon fiber door sill inserts.But that’s not all. The 100 buyers lucky enough to scoop this car up will also receive a leather garment bag that can fold into a travel bag. Flare Yellow lining matches the car’s paint, and there’s double yellow stitching on the top hem. Everything else about the car is the same as usual, though. Under the hood is a 5.0-liter naturally aspirated V8 putting out 471 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque, all of which is sent to the rear wheels through a 10-speed automatic transmission. When it goes on sale in April, the 2019 Lexus LC 500 Inspiration Series will set you back a cool $106,210, about $14,000 more than a base model. Review • 2018 Lexus LC 500: Flagship coupe packs stunning style and performance More about 2018 Lexus LC Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate adds a 60-40 split Chicago Auto Show 2019 Lexus More From Roadshow Lexuslast_img read more

Omani woman Jokha alHarthi becomes 1st Arab author to win Man Booker

first_imgJokha Alharthi wins Man Booker International Prize for ‘Celestial Bodies’Google ImagesOmani author Jokha al-Harthi has become the first Arab author to win the Man Booker Prize. The 41-year-old, who wrote Celestial Bodies, has said that she will share the £50,000 prize money with her book’s translator – Marilyn Booth. She is also the first Omani author to have translated her book into English.Celestial Bodies has been called a timeless classic by critics as well as members of the jury. It is based on the story of three sisters and their struggles through which the readers can gaze into the stereotypes that are prevalent in the Arabian society.”It is a book to win over the head and the heart in equal measure, worth lingering over. Interweaving voices and timelines are beautifully served by the pacing of the novel. Its delicate artistry draws us into a richly imagined community – opening out to tackle profound questions of time and mortality and disturbing aspects of our shared history,” said Bettany Hughes, a historian and chair of the judges.Hughes described the style of the book as a metaphor that subtly resists cliches of slavery, patriarchy, and race. The translation has been described as being perfect and lyrical, weaving in the cadences of both poetry and everyday speech. Jokha Alharthi , the winner of Man Booker Prize, 2019 along with the translator of her book, Celestial BodiesGoogle ImagesMaya, Asma and Khawla are three sisters who belong to Al-Awfi village of Oman and are either married by choice, force or longing to meet their beloved. They see through their independent struggles and also witness a change in their homeland from a colonial era to a fairly urbane lifestyle.”How women fare in changed circumstances and what they are and are not allowed to remember is a recurring preoccupation.  Alharthi tracks the fortunes of a merchant family with a troubled past in the slave trade and concentrates in particular on the lives and destinies of sisters, Mayya, Asma and Khowla. Ranging across three generations with a crowd of voices tracking Oman’s shift from a typical desert dynasty of the village al-Awafi to the urban oasis of the city Muscat, the novel is a beautifully achieved account of lives pulling at the edges of change,” Michael Cronin, the director of the Trinity Centre for Literary and Cultural Translation, wrote in his review for Irish Times.last_img read more