Booker’s rant reveals Democrats’ Trump obsession

first_imgYou may be there awhile. And, when pressed for a response, be ready with an appropriate line, such as, “I’m sorry. Was there a question in there?”Learn to swat imaginary flies and squint as if you notice a spider on the head of the inquisitor.Anyway, Booker may have been the most wincingly awful to watch, but he is by no means the only Democratic White House hopeful jockeying to position himself or herself as the most liberal, the most outraged, the most synthetically sincere of 2020 contenders.Booker’s pinwheel-eyed fulmination takes its place alongside similarly shameful rants from Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez and other liberal one-uppers stumbling over themselves to prove their anti-Trump bona fides.They may think they’re feeding their Democratic base — after all, social media has turned anti-Trump outrage into an industry — but there are two problems with this assumption.First, even the most rabid anti-Trumpists want substance from their Democratic candidates, and Booker and others have produced none.Second, in their lemming-like scramble to the fringe, Democrats are abandoning the sensible center, where most Americans live and the position from which they wish their lawmakers to govern. The pain and drama of it all was just too much.And it’s only January. The first presidential primary is more than two years away.Booker’s rant is only an early taste of many more to come from an increasingly clamorous field of Democratic presidential hopefuls.The Democratic Party is lurching irreparably to the left and has nothing to offer voters in 2020 other than outrage over Trump’s latest tweet and the resuscitation of tired policies that would return a booming U.S. economy to the stagnant Obama years.It’s too bad Nielsen couldn’t have punctuated Booker’s rant with a well-played stage yawn, giving his self-serving jeremiad the treatment it deserved.Over the next two years, more Cabinet officials will be testifying before Congress and the Democratic Outrage Machine will pounce with their rehearsed lines and faux outrage.Pro tip to the unlucky witnesses: Bring reading material.  For months, I have written about the Democratic Party’s dangerous lurch to the left.Beginning with support for the Sanders-backed promise of universal health care, Democrats are now in the position where the only way they can distinguish themselves and prevent an onslaught of attacks from their progressive base is to take on and embrace increasingly polarized leftist positions and a continuing stream of anti-Trump venom.Even the liberal New York Times has taken note with the recent headline on an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Senate Democrats Make Hard Turn Left in Warming Up for 2020 Race.”The fact that Democrats are abandoning any notion of compromise and refusing to appeal to independent and moderate voters should come as no surprise.The party has been hijacked by radical voices from within, and what we are seeing now is only the beginning of what is to come.Ed Rogers is a political consultant and a veteran of the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush White Houses and several national campaigns. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionAnybody who watched the clumsy histrionics of Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., at last week’s Senate grilling of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen had to feel a little sorry for him.His overacting was on full display before the Senate Judiciary Committee and TV cameras.Booker posed, pretended, preened and generally made a fool of himself shouting at Nielsen about President Donald Trump’s latest inexplicable comments regarding immigrants from certain parts of the world.In releasing his almost-comical wrath, Booker’s performance was so awful and cringe-worthy that I actually felt embarrassed for him.He even copped to weeping “tears of rage.”last_img read more

Location change in Bantam Provincials

first_imgThere has been a schedule change for the Bantam Tier 2 Provincial Hockey Tournament currently taking place in Fort St. John.The games scheduled to take place Monday afternoon have been moved from the North Peace Arena to the Pomeroy Sport Centre. The new schedule affects:- Advertisement -2 p.m.: Cranbrook vs. Rossland Trail5 p.m.: Burnaby WC vs. Juan De Fuca GrizzliesThere is a game set to take place at 8 p.m. Monday, but the location has not yet been determined. The information will be posted as soon as it becomes available.last_img

Saanjh Kendras to Now Look Into Complaints of NRIs in Punjab

first_imgMore than 100 Saanjh Kendras or service centers will come up in Punjab to look into the grievances of Non-Resident Indians (NRIs). The Punjab Police have authorized the establishment of these centers in a move that aims to make it easier for NRIs to register their complaints.The state already has 15 police stations that have been set up specially to look into the complaints of NRIs, the Hindustan Times reported. Since many districts do not have these police stations, complainants now have to travel to different districts to lodge their grievances. The establishment of Saanjh Kendras will save the time of the NRIs who wish to approach the government for redressal of issues.“For example, people from Mansa were travelling to Bathinda to register complaints as the jurisdiction is with that police station. Those from Tarn Taran had to visit Amristar; and Sangrur’s NRI police station was covering Barnala too,” Ishwar Singh, the inspector general of police (IGP), NRI affairs, was quoted as saying in the report.The NRI complainants can also register their problems online by visiting the web portal of Saanjh Kendra: www.ppsaanjh.in. These centers are located at the headquarters of all the police district and commissionerate as well as at 114 sub-divisional levels. While inspectors are posted at district-level Saanjh Kendras, assistant sub-inspectors or sub-inspectors oversee the ones at sub-division level Kendras.Plans are also afoot to “restructure” the NRI police station system. “At these police stations in Sangrur, Ferozepur and Gurdaspur, for instance, the number of complaints is low, hence the staff don’t get enough work. Once the Saanjh Kendra experiment for NRIs’ complaints is fully successful, these stations can be closed down to use the force in routine policing,” a DGP-rank officer said, the publication reported.These centers also registered complaints of marital discord earlier. However, after a Supreme Court ruling which stated that all marital disputes will first have to be sent to a family welfare committee constituted at the district and sessions level, the workload at these Kendras has come down. “That is why a committee led by the DGP (director general of police) decided to use the staff posted in these centers for NRI disputes too,” the report quoted an official as saying.“Saanjh, a collaborative effort of police and community, takes the philosophy down to the grassroots through sub divisional Saanjh Kendras and police station Saanjh Kendras,” the Punjab Police stated on the Saanjh website. It added that a statewide IT platform with centralized server at the police headquarters linked to every Saanjh Kendra enabled centralized data uploading and access, providing citizens with copies of FlRs, untraced reports, no objection certificates, etc., at a click of a button, in a time bound frame. Related ItemsPunjablast_img read more

All 5 candidates from Punjab elected unopposed to RS

first_imgChandigarh, Mar 14 (PTI) All five candidates from Punjab, including sitting MPs, Sukhdev Singh Dhindsa and Naresh Gujral (Akalis), and former state party chiefs, Partap Singh Bajwa and Shmasher Singh Dullo (Congress) were today elected unopposed to Rajya Sabha.Today was the last day of withdrawal of nominations to the Upper House and none of the five contestants withdrew their papers and no one filed their papers against them. All the five have been elected unopposed, an official spokesman said here.BJP candidate Shwet Malik too was elected unopposed from the state.Senior SAD leaders, Dhindsa and Gujral, who is son of former Prime Minister I K Gujral, were renominated by the party.Former Union ministers Ashwani Kumar and M S Gill were not given renomination to the Rajya Sabha by Congress which had made former Punjab PCC chiefs Partap Singh Bajwa and Shamsher Singh Dullo its candidates for the polls from the state.By nominating Bajwa, Congress has sought to reward him for making way for Amarinder Singh as PCC chief a few months ago, ahead of the crucial assembly elections scheduled early next year.With the nomination of Dullo, a prominent Dalit leader, Congress has sought to woo Jats and Dalits who comprise a sizable section in the poll-bound state.BJP nominated former Amritsar Mayor Shwet Malik as the term of Avinash Rai Khanna was coming to an end.Khanna, who is in-charge of party affairs in Jammu and Kashmir and the partys central election-officer, was not given a renomination. His term comes to an end on April 9.advertisementThe term of office of five members of Rajya Sabha elected from Punjab will expire in April. PTI VJ SRY PAL SRYlast_img read more

The Fight for Net Neutrality The Sequel

first_imgShare31Tweet7Share2Email40 SharesPhotos by Rick Barry of Broken Shade Photo.April 28, 2017; The HillRemember the blissful days of 2015? Back then, the Federal Communications Commission declared that broadband Internet service was a telecom service under Title II of the Communications Act and enacted measures to ensure an open Internet not throttled or manipulated based on content or provider. At that time, Ajit Pai was one of the members of the Commission and dead-set against such moves, which fall under the common moniker of “net neutrality.” Now, Pai heads up the FCC under the Trump Administration, and he’s moving to undo all that was done under Tom Wheeler’s reign and supported through several appellate decisions in the years that followed.At the next FCC meeting on May 18th, Pai wants to take action. He’s issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that lays out the following measures:Propose to reinstate the information service classification of broadband Internet access service and return to the light-touch regulatory framework first established on a bipartisan basis during the Clinton Administration.Propose to reinstate the determination that mobile broadband Internet access service is not a commercial mobile service and in conjunction revisit the elements of the Title II Order that modified or reinterpreted key terms in section 332 of the Communications Act and our implementing rules.Propose to return authority to the Federal Trade Commission to police the privacy practices of Internet service providers.Propose to eliminate the vague Internet conduct standard.Seek comment on whether to keep, modify, or eliminate the bright-line rules set forth in the Title II Order.Propose to re-evaluate the Commission’s enforcement regime to analyze whether ex ante regulatory intervention in the market is necessary.Propose to conduct a cost-benefit analysis as part of this proceeding.The FCC plans to release an official proposal on Thursday. If approved, that would start a 90-day period of public comment and response that would lead to a final order that the Commission could vote on. The release of the initial proposal is a move toward transparency, but senior FCC officials have emphasized that this isn’t a public opinion poll.Pai has said he supports the basic tenets of net neutrality, but not the means of implementation. However, as Politico writes, there’s no clear path to maintaining that ethos once this decision is undone.It’s unclear how Pai will be able to preserve the FCC’s net neutrality role without grounding its rules in the regulatory structure, approved two years ago, that treats ISPs like telephone-style utilities, subjecting them to tighter oversight. The FCC lost a court battle over a previous version of the rules that did not employ that structure, but the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals upheld the 2015 order last June in a 2-1 decision.Pai initially floated an idea to seek voluntary commitments from internet providers to adhere to net neutrality principles, under the purview of the FTC, but that concept appears to have fallen by the wayside amid a backlash from net neutrality activists. Even Pai’s fellow GOP commissioner, Michael O’Rielly, who’s no fan of the current rules, expressed some skepticism about obtaining voluntary commitments from private companies.At this early stage, those who wish to step up and fight for net neutrality can make their public comments known at the FCC page and contribute to organizations like Fight for the Future. There’s even a crowdfunding effort set up to wage the second battle in this ongoing conflict—although this time, the tidal waves of funding seem to have slowed to a trickle.—Jason SchneidermanShare31Tweet7Share2Email40 Shareslast_img read more