CVPS declares 23-cent per share dividend

first_imgRUTLAND, VT — (Marketwire) — 05/06/09 — On May 5, 2009, the board of directors of Central Vermont Public Service (NYSE: CV) declared a quarterly dividend of 23 cents per share on the issued and outstanding shares of common stock, $6 par value, payable Aug. 14, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business Aug. 4, 2009. The board of directors also declared dividends on the outstanding preferred stock, $100 par value, of $1.04 per share on the 4.15% dividend series; $1.17 per share on the 4.65% dividend series; $1.19 per share on the 4.75% dividend series; $1.34375 per share on the 5.375% dividend series; and $2.075 per share on the 8.30% dividend series, payable July 1, 2009 to stockholders of record at the close of business June 19, 2009.CVPS is Vermont’s largest electric utility, serving approximately 159,000 customers statewide. The company’s non-regulated subsidiary, Catamount Resources Corporation, sells and rents electric water heaters through a subsidiary, SmartEnergy Water Heating Services.last_img read more

Peruvian Peace Corps Learns to Prevent Tropical Diseases

first_imgBy Gonzalo Silva Infante/Diálogo January 17, 2019 The Peruvian Armed Forces’ Joint Command (CCFFAA, in Spanish) concluded 2018 with the inauguration of a health education and prevention course for members of peacekeeping operations. The Tropical Diseases course, conducted with the support of the U.S. Embassy in Lima, gathered 60 units of the Peruvian, Colombian, and Salvadoran armed forces. The objective of the course was to analyze tropical diseases that threaten service members deployed in peacekeeping missions. The course also sought to provide better knowledge on how to prevent endemic infectious diseases, such as dengue, zika, yellow fever, hemorrhagic fevers, and monkeypox, among others, with greater emphasis on malaria. The course was taught with the support of the U.S. Military Assistance Advisory Group and the U.S. Department of Defense’s Defense Institute for Medical Operations (DIMO). Four instructors taught the course under the leadership of U.S. Air Force Lieutenant Colonel Jessica Cowden, chief of infectious disease programs. The loss of a Peruvian blue helmet deployed with the Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in the Central African Republic (MINUSCA, in French) prompted the creation of the course. “It was a very tough lesson learned that warned us about the risks and, above all, how it was addressed,” Peruvian Navy Petty Officer Second Class Edsson Evaristo Alvarado, CCFFAA analyst on peacekeeping operations and course organizer, told Diálogo. “It was in 2014 in Africa, where ebola was taking its toll, so they treated [the blue helmet] as if it were that disease. He was quarantined, and instead of treating him for malaria, they treated him for ebola, and he died.” Preventing illnesses The five-day course was divided into two phases. During the initial theoretical phase, DIMO’s instructors shared their knowledge and experiences. They focused on preventing malaria, chemoprophylaxis—the use of medication to prevent a disease—severe malaria, malaria surveillance programs; and the history, transmission, and detection of the Ebola virus and monkeypox. Instructors also addressed diseases transmitted through food and the sanitary conditions of dining areas. With the topics covered, they sought to promote prevention among military personnel deployed in peacekeeping missions. “The idea is to prevent diseases, and doing research before going on a [peacekeeping] mission,” Peruvian Air Force Petty Officer Second Class Jacqueline Galarza López, who participated in the course before deploying to MINUSCA, told Diálogo. “We attend talks at the Peruvian Training and Instruction Center for Peacekeeping Operations, but in this seminar we saw instructions, experiences, and medical processes that take place upon return.” The second phase, the hands-on part, required students’ active participation to conduct malaria diagnostic tests and blood sample observation under microscopes, among other procedures. “The U.S. personnel taught us how to do the tests and how to immunize uniforms, and they gave us clothes for the contingent that’s about to travel,” said Petty Officer 2nd Class Galarza. A benefit for the region In addition to the Peruvian units to be deployed in January or February of 2019 to join the peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, military health corps members also took part in the course. According to Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado, Colombian and Salvadoran personnel were invited to learn and share their experience. “We convened the medical personnel from military institutions who deal with health issues of the personnel that takes part in peacekeeping operations, the nurse that administers vaccines, the doctor who provides medical certificates, and those who deal with epidemic issues in each institution, among others,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado said. “Participants included personnel we offered to the UN who have already been accepted.” With its own experience in the field and the support of U.S. experts, Peru’s CCFFAA seeks to improve deployments and protect the health of its units in peacekeeping missions. When taught again, the course will be beneficial to regional partner nations that want to increase their participation in peacekeeping missions in countries prone to infectious diseases. “Most importantly, during the course we realized that we are pioneers in South America in teaching it,” Petty Officer 2nd Class Alvarado concluded. “We learned and presented new things, and we expect to cover more at the national level. The service member leaves, but it’s a human being who returns, potentially bringing back an epidemic element.”last_img read more

Leadership Matters: Lessons from the Titanic

first_imgAs a credit union leader, you are responsible for the wellbeing and success of your institution, employees and members. You are the captain of your ship; while the employees steer the ship, the captain is responsible for steering the course. Leaders cannot take success for granted or be blind to the challenges and obstacles they face. Over 100 years ago, Titanic Captain E.J. Smith fell into that trap, which resulted in one of the greatest disasters of all time. The lessons learned from that sinking can be applied to your credit union as well.The Leader Is Always ResponsibleLeadership expert John Maxwell states “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” The maiden voyage of the Titanic was Capt. E.J. Smith’s retirement trip. His final duty was to pilot the grandest ship ever built into New York Harbor. However, Smith took many safety issues and precautions for granted on the trip. He ignored multiple iceberg warnings from his crew and neighboring ships. Smith ignored safety concerns by pushing the ship to its limits the first time out in the attempt to reach New York two days ahead of schedule.Leadership is about everything you do, and the things you don’t do. Maxwell says, “Leadership is influence, nothing more, nothing less.” The leader sets the stage and influences others to act; the leader is always present, even when he or she is not there physically. 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Resident Claims Put Union County Responders Under Fire

first_imgUNION COUNTY, Ind. – A house fire that occurred in Union County earlier this year could cost the county big bucks.Two Liberty residents claim the county failed when a home caught on fire on Old State Route 101 February 25.First reported by the Liberty Herald, a 911 report of a structure fire came in around 12:30 a.m. and a police officer was dispatched to the scene, however, did not report and failed to notify dispatchers.A second 911 call was made three hours later regarding a grass fire in the same location. The Liberty Volunteer Fire Department was dispatched and arrived to a completely burnt structure along with a grass fire.A tort claim has been filed by Dale Brandt and Monica Sherwood, both of Liberty, in response to damaged personal property in the fire.The claim alleges county employees failed on three occasions. First, the police officer did not go to the scene of the fire and also failed to notify dispatchers. Also, the claim states that dispatchers did not send out firefighters on the initial call.Brandt is seeking $75,000 in damages and Sherwood is asking for $125,000 in restitution, the newspaper reports.last_img read more

With petition, council might pivot on marijuana policy

first_imgThey submitted the petition to the City Clerk’s Office to call for a referendum on the March municipal election ballot, halting the ban from going into effect last Thursday. The City Attorney’s Office notified 1,046 suspected dispensary locations to shut down by the Sept. 6 deadline or face a fine when the ban was approved in July. Los Angeles city officials are not currently enforcing the ban because of their ongoing verification of the 50,000 signatures submitted on the petition.When the council passed the ban in July, a total of 762 dispensaries were registered within the city of Los Angeles. The new regulation does not permit the sale of medical marijuana in stores but does allow licensed patients and caregivers to grow their own marijuana under the Compassionate Care Act.Steven Hwang, a USC alumnus who majored in human performance, co-founded Students for Sensible Drug Policy in January to push for drug policy reform. He said his organization did not help with directly gathering signatures for the petition but helped spread information about the ban.“It’s not a sensible policy whatsoever,” Hwang said. “We always want to ease patient access. We always want to provide them with the best quality for them to enjoy and medicate on their own from the safety of their homes. This ban is really out of touch with what the citizens are asking for.”If the petition to eliminate the ban is verified, the L.A. City Council will decide whether to repeal the ordinance, call for a special election within the next 140 days or put it on the ballot March 5.Sarah Lovering, development officer for the Marijuana Policy Project, said the ban will likely be overturned. She is also unsure, however, what it will mean for medical marijuana policy overall as the ban also bars the city from enforcing a 2010 ordinance to regulate dispensaries.“If the ban is repealed, then I guess we go to a situation where there is no ordinance, which could be good for patients,” she said. “It means that patients will be able to shop at dispensaries. But dispensary owners will be at risk because there won’t be any clear guidelines about who’s allowed to operate and where.”She said the alternative to dispensaries is generally the black market, where there is no guarantee of quality or consistency of the product.“The benefits [of dispensaries] are things like patients who need medical marijuana will be able to find it much more easily and be able to have a lot more in its quality,” she said. “A lot of dispensaries do test their products and even those who don’t … it would be very easy to tell others about that and report it.”Junior business major Cynthia Bardon said she supports the use of medical marijuana but sees potential dangers in a lack of regulation.“There should be more control to avoid illegal trafficking,” Bardon said. “If people are going to try to obtain it illegally through street vendors, it will be more dangerous.”Hwang said part of the initial goal of SSDP was to put a legalization initiative on the November ballot. Though there is no initiative on the ballot, Hwang said that SSDP will continue working for new policies.“We’re going to be rallying everyone to overturn this ban in March and elect more officials who have more sensible policies,” he said. “This ban … really makes no sense on how we can continue to ease access for the patients instead of putting up barriers and putting our patients in very dangerous situations.”Staff writer Kimberly Montenegro contributed to this report. Medical marijuana supporters collected 50,000 signatures to overturn a ban to shut down most of the medical marijuana storefront dispensaries in Los Angeles last Thursday.Green doctors · Students for Sensible Drug Policy pushed against a potential ban on marijuana dispensaries, like this one in Venice Beach. – Lisa Parker | Daily Trojanlast_img read more

Lindstrom: Falcons’ O-line must ‘do better’ to protect Ryan

first_img First Published: 16th August, 2020 08:28 IST FOLLOW US WATCH US LIVE Chris Lindstrom had to spend far too much of his rookie season imagining how he would prepare for a game.The Atlanta Falcons’ right guard is more than ready for a full season of reality.Lindstrom, the No. 14 overall pick in the 2019 NFL draft by Atlanta, broke his right foot in the Falcons’ opening game at Minnesota. He missed the next 11 games.“The whole time I was injured, I was preparing like I was playing the game every single week,” Lindstrom said Saturday. “I’d write down notes. This is what I want to do against this guy.”It was a lost season for Lindstrom and the Falcons, who finished 7-9 despite closing the year with four consecutive wins after the rookie returned from the injury.Lindstrom is eager to take advantage of the crucial experience gained in those four games as he prepares for his second season. He’s had more time to develop chemistry with right tackle Kaleb McGary, another first-round pick last year.The Falcons expect Lindstrom and McGary to provide long-term stability on the right side of the line. The team desperately needs improved play from the line.Last year’s line never achieved the continuity that had been planned. Matt Ryan was sacked a career-high 48 times and missed a game for the first time since 2009 due to an ankle injury on one of the sacks.The run-blocking also was a problem. The Falcons finished ahead of only two teams in rushing. The line must provide better protection for Ryan and better running lanes for their new lead rusher, Todd Gurley.“We know we need to do better as a unit and we’re being accountable for that and working toward it,” Lindstrom said.Left tackle Jake Matthews and center Alex Mack are fixtures on the line. Rookie Matt Hennessey, a third-round pick, could start at left guard.The competition at left guard that could also include James Carpenter, Matt Gono and others. Coach Dan Quinn expects to see Lindstrom and McGary provide more consistent production on the right side of the line.“No. 1, usually that’s when you see a big push in terms of where a player can go to from rookie year into second year,” Quinn said Wednesday. “Often, that’s the case with linemen — both offensive and defensive linemen. Physically, both are doing well.”Linebacker Deion Jones said Lindstrom’s final four games last season were impressive.“The fact he was able to get back out there and feel his foot out and get the chance to get back after it the way he does,” Jones said. “He’s fast, he’s physical. He always wants to be perfect. He’s always looking for edges in his game. With Kaleb, they’ve been growing together and figuring it out together and they’ve been awesome.”NOTES: FB Keith Smith was activated from the team’s reserve/COVID-19 list. … Rookie CB A.J. Terrell, the first-round pick from Clemson, provided the highlight of Saturday’s practice when he soared to intercept a pass from Ryan intended for Calvin Ridley. Jones said Terrell “made a great play. That was awesome to see.”Image credits: AP Last Updated: 16th August, 2020 08:28 IST Lindstrom: Falcons’ O-line Must ‘do Better’ To Protect Ryan Lindstrom, the No. 14 overall pick in the 2019 NFL draft by Atlanta, broke his right foot in the Falcons’ opening game at Minnesota. He missed the next 11 games COMMENTcenter_img SUBSCRIBE TO US LIVE TV Associated Press Television News Written Bylast_img read more