Warming May Make Hurricanes Weaken More Slowly After Landfall

first_imgA hurricane is essentially a heat engine, a rotating storm fueled by moisture from the warm ocean. The prevailing theory as to how hurricanes weaken after landfall is that once they lose that source of fuel, friction with land causes their spinning to slow down.Dr. Chakraborty likened it to a swirling cup of tea. “Over the ocean, because the moisture supply is there for the heat engine, you’re constantly stirring the tea,” he said. But when it hits land the supply is cut off, the stirring stops and friction causes the swirling to slow“Importantly, thermodynamics plays no role” in this process of slowing, according to the theory, he said.What he and his co-author suggest, however, is that the moisture remaining in the storm plays a thermodynamic role, affecting the rate at which the storm weakens. And in a warming climate, with warmer sea-surface temperatures, there is more moisture remaining in the storm.“Once we understand that moisture plays a key role, the connection with climate becomes evident,” Dr. Chakraborty said.Their hurricane simulations allowed them to test the idea that moisture plays a role by creating “dry” hurricanes, without moisture, that decayed much more rapidly than normal ones. The models also allowed them to determine that factors like topography and the weather inland played less of a role in storms’ weakening.Dr. Camargo said one potential weakness of the study was that the models used were, by necessity, rather simple. Modeling hurricanes after landfall is difficult, she said. “It’s a hard problem. The models have to capture a lot of things that are going on — the interaction with topography, for instance.”“I don’t know if what they did in the model is the best way to represent landfalling hurricanes,” Dr. Camargo added. “But at least in this model, it seems to agree with their idea.”Dr. Chakraborty said he was not surprised there was some skepticism about the findings. “Overall, our study challenges widely-held ideas about hurricane decay,” he said. “I hope this will spur more research and shed new light on this important area that is long thought to be well understood.” In studying the effects of climate change on hurricanes, scientists have focused on what occurs over water, when storms are forming and strengthening, picking up heat and moisture as they churn over the ocean.But a new study looks at what happens after hurricanes make landfall and work their way inland. The research suggests that climate change is affecting storms during this phase of their life as well, causing them to weaken more slowly and remain destructive for longer.- Advertisement – The findings could have implications for how emergency-management agencies prepare for storms post-landfall.In the study, published Wednesday in the journal Nature, Lin Li and Pinaki Chakraborty of the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University in Japan analyzed data from North Atlantic hurricanes that made landfall from 1967 to 2018, looking at the decay in intensity, or wind speed, of the storms in the first day after hitting land. One prominent hurricane researcher, Kerry Emanuel of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, said he was skeptical of the findings. In an email message, Dr. Emanuel said he disagreed with the researchers’ theoretical argument and that the data and simulations, “while suggestive, do not definitively prove the case that decay is slower in warmer climates independent of other factors, such as storm size.” – Advertisement – But other researchers said the study was compelling and opened up a new field of hurricane research, on their behavior over land. Even weakened, winds from these storms can topple trees and power lines, damage homes and cause other destruction well inland. Dan Chavas, an atmospheric scientist at Purdue University who wrote an article accompanying the paper in Nature, said the work was “definitive in identifying a topic almost no one has thought about and could be very important.”Suzana Camargo, a hurricane researcher at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, a part of Columbia University, said that she and colleagues published a study last year that showed that stronger hurricanes produced more precipitation after making landfall.In the new study, she said, “they are saying that moisture stays in the storm for a while, and that completely makes sense with what we saw in our study.” They found that while 50 years ago a typical storm would have lost more than three-quarters of its intensity in the first 24 hours, when it might travel several hundred miles inland, now it would only lose about half.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – “The decay has slowed down tremendously over the last 50 years,” Dr. Chakraborty said in an interview. “There may very well be a climatic link.”Comparing the data on decay with changes in sea-surface temperatures, and then using simulations of hurricanes moving onto land, the scientists discovered what they say is the link: Rising ocean temperatures linked to global warming are causing the storms to weaken more slowly, even after storms move away from the source of the moisture.The scientists cautioned that there were caveats to their research, among them that they used a relatively small data set — only 71 hurricanes made landfall over five decades.last_img read more

SMP eGaming ‘seeks individuality’ with Amber Gaming rebrand

first_img IoM Digital appoints Chris Kissack as esports lead  July 22, 2020 Share Submit BetConstruct granted Isle of Man B2B Software Supplier Licence April 15, 2019 Isle of Man compliance advisory SMP Partners has confirmed that it will rebrand its gaming division to ‘Amber Gaming’ after it was presented with ‘an incredible opportunity to carve out its own identity and forge ahead with its own plans for growth’.Under the rebrand, the products and services offered by Amber Gaming will include licensing consultancy, compliance 365, ISO and GDPR consultancy, risk and AML frameworks, problem gambling and effectiveness reviews, ongoing advisory and support, corporate management and administration, book-keeping and accountancy. In addition, Amber Gaming will offer training via the Amber Gaming Compliance Academy.The firm will be spearheaded by a senior management team that includes managing director Ted Pepper and directors Jade Zorab, Matthew Robins and Karen Yates.Pepper explained: “I want to take this opportunity to thank the entire Amber Gaming team for their hard work and dedication to help get us to this pivotal moment. Amber Gaming has been born from their outstanding customer service, knowledge of the industry and their enthusiasm to make us the best possible business we can be.“With this fantastic team behind us, I’m very confident that Amber Gaming is going to be a huge success and we look forward to working with our clients and partners to help them to set, meet and exceed standards across core aspects of their business, from licensing and ongoing compliance, full management and more.”Products and services will be offered by or available through the Amber Gaming group of companies to all online gambling organisations.Amber Gaming will also offer specialised corporate structuring, management and accounting services to the esports industry, following the hire of a dedicated industry specialist last year. Related Articles Share SMP eGaming expands its board following high demand in 2019 November 15, 2019 StumbleUponlast_img read more

Cold Cases Unit probing 5 murder cases

first_img…technology leading to more cases being solved – Crime ChiefThe Guyana Cold Cases Unit is currently probing five murder cases that have been pending for a number of years due to insufficient evidence collected when those crimes were committed.Crime Chief Lyndon AlvesThis is according to the Crime Chief, Deputy Police Commissioner Lyndon Alves, who has responsibility for law enforcement in the Guyana Police Force.In an exclusive interview with Guyana Times, Alves explained that these cases are being pursued by both the Cold Cases Unit and the Major Crimes Investigations Unit (MCIU).“There are quite a few cases that are unsolved, so we are working to take care of these. For the first quarter of this year, we already solved two cold cases, where each had been unsolved for almost 10 years; and with those two out of the way, we are looking at five now, and they are very, very old. These are the current cases of interest to the MCIU and the Cold Cases Unit,” he explained.According to Alves, the five cases could not have been further investigated, due to either lack of evidence at the time that each occurred or because the appropriate technology had not been available. However, those hindrances of the past will not prevent the Units from probing them this time around, he said.“Due to the hard work and dedication of staff at the Cold Case Unit and the MCIU, coupled with technology, the systems put in place by both Units are working to help solve these murders. That’s what helped us close those two cold cases for this year. The additional information, staffing and equipment etc. I would not say we have reached where we wanted in terms of bolstering human resources and equipment, but we are definitely getting there,” the Deputy Police Commissioner further explained.He said that while there are five cases being heavily focused on by the above-mentioned Units, this does not mean that other cold cases and unsolved murders are any less important. Those, too, will be probed again, sooner rather than later, Alves added.The most recent cold case to be solved in Guyana is that of the murder of businessman Ramzan Alli, which occurred at Coldingen Railway Embankment Road, East Coast Demerara (ECD) between July 11 and 12, 2009.His then wife, Milaimi Alli, has been nabbed at the Cheddi Jagan International Airport (CJIA) recently for the 2009 murder of the businessman. She appeared at the Georgetown Magistrates’ Courts on Wednesday to answer a murder charge.Milaimi Alli was not required to plead to the indictable charge, which stated that while being in the company of another, she murdered her husband Ramzan Alli at Coldingen Railway Embankment Road, East Coast Demerara (ECD) between July 11 and 12, 2009.The 49-year-old woman of Kissoon Housing Scheme, Good Hope, ECD was represented by Attorney-at-Law Bernard DaSilva, who told the court that his client is a mother of five, and given that the murder happened 10 years ago, he would like to have an early date for the preliminary inquiry to commence.The Police Prosecutor has told the court that the Police file is incomplete.The woman was remanded to prison and the matter has been transferred to the Vigilance Magistrate’s Court for April 15.The woman arrived in Guyana mere days after a wanted bulletin was issued for her arrest. Upon her arrival on a Caribbean Airlines flight from the United States of America, she was arrested and taken to the Criminal Investigations Department (CID) headquarters, where she was grilled, after which the murder charge was instituted.Investigators received new information that Alli paid her lover $7 million to kill her husband, which led them to reopen their investigation into the murder of the fuel dealer in March 2009.Thirty-eight-year-old Zaheed Mitchell of Foulis, ECD was recently charged for his involvement in the murder of Alli.last_img read more

ASA Taps 16 Growers from Nine States for WISHH Leadership Team

first_imgAmerican Soybean Association (ASA) President Steve Wellman has confirmed 16 soybean growers from nine states to ASA’s World Initiative for Soy in Human Health (WISHH) Committee in 2012-13. WISHH Committee Members reelected David Iverson of South Dakota as chair and Andy Welden of Michigan as vice chair. Illinois grower Dan Farney is the new treasurer. Lucas Heinen of Kansas now serves as secretary.New WISHH Committee Members for 2012-13 are: Gary Berg (Ill.); Ron Bunjer (Minn.); Ryan Cahoon (N.C.); Dean Coleman (Iowa); Levi Huffman (Ind.); Mike Marron (Ill.); Joe Murphy (Ill.), and Art Wosick (N.D.). Returning to the Committee are Scott Fritz (Ind.); Monica McCranie (S.D.); Darrel McGriff (Ind.), and Randy Van Kooten (Iowa). United Soybean Board Director Mary Lou Smith (Mich.), and Drew Klein, representing the U.S. Soybean Export Council, serve as ex-officio members of the Committee.Wellman and Iverson recognize outgoing WISHH Members: Ken Bartlett (N.C.); Pat Dumoulin (Ill.); C.W. Gaffner (Ill.); Jared Hagert (N.D.); John Heisdorffer (Iowa); Barb Overlie (Minn.), and Jack Trumbo (Ky.).”ASA thanks the visionary farmers who have led and those who will now lead WISHH to new market frontiers for U.S. soy,” said Wellman. “Building overseas markets for any product takes years, but WISHH has already created new markets for our soy in Africa and beyond.”A new U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) science white paper released on July 24, highlights the importance of developing countries. It leads with, “The future success of U.S. agriculture is tied to economic growth in the developing world. These countries play a vital role in expanding feed and food export markets…”The USDA paper also cites the world population is estimated at 7 billion as of May 2012 and will increase to more than 9 billion by 2050. Currently, nearly one billion people globally are estimated to be food insecure, with 44 percent residing in Sub-Saharan Africa, according to USDA Economist Shahla Shapouri.”Growing populations and increasing incomes are driving demand for U.S. soy protein in developing countries,” said Iverson. “We look forward to working with the many developing country entrepreneurs and organizations that are eager to use U.S. soy to improve the diets as well as economic opportunities in these countries.”Since U.S. soybean farmers founded WISHH in 2000, WISHH has worked in 23 countries to improve diets, as well as encourage growth of food industries. The WISHH program is managed from ASA’s world headquarters in Saint Louis. For more information, visit www.wishh.org.Video interviews by WISHH Committee Members are available at www.youtube.com/user/WISHHSoybeans.2012-13 WISHH Committee.###For more information, contact:Steve Wellman, ASA President, 402-269-7024, wellmanfarms@sbllcweb.comVickie Wilks, WISHH Director of Operations, 314-754-1341, vwilks@soy.orgPatrick Delaney, ASA Communications Director, 202-969-7040, pdelaney@soy.orglast_img read more