Two can’t miss webinars: Dan Heath and Guy Kawasaki!

first_imgNetwork for Good has two amazing webinars coming up – and (as usual) they are free with registration.*Nonprofit 911: How to Get More Followers on Social Media w/ Guy KawasakiThursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. EasternWhy isn’t your hashtag everywhere? When’s the best time for a Facebook status update? What does it mean when someone +1’s you on Google +? How come no one liked your picture, story, update, tweet, share, friendship, etc? You might be caught a social media slump!Tune in Thursday, March 21 at 1 p.m. Eastern to hear tech and social media expert Guy Kawasaki lead a free presentation giving nonprofits the insider scoop on garnering support via the most popular social media platforms.Register here.Nonprofit 911: The Decisive Organization: Building a Culture of Better Decision-MakingMonday, March 25 at 1 p.m. EasternBest-selling Switch author Dan Heath’s done it again! Decisive: How to Make Better Choices in Life and Work hits shelves next week. He’s going to stop by and pre-release the most helpful decision-making practices to the Network for Good audience via a Nonprofit 911 webinar on Monday, the 25th at 1 p.m. Eastern. Join Dan Heath as he makes it easier for your organization to make that sound decision. Bonus: Dan will be giving away a free copy of his new book to 10 lucky nonprofits on the call.Register here.*If you can’t make the date for Guy Kawasaki, sign up anyway. You will get a recording of the webinar afterward! Dan Heath’s session is live only, so we won’t be sending recordings.last_img read more

Use the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly to Strengthen Your Donor Communications

first_imgDonor communications that connect—that appreciate, energize, and activate your prospects and donors—are the key to fundraising success. But you already know that.What you may not know, however, is that few organizations do donor communications well. Most have lots of room to improve, as evidenced by the focus on donor communications in conference agendas, e-newsletters, blog content in the field, Facebook chats, Twitter discussions, and more. If that’s your organization, you’re not alone!Now, with the release of Integrated Fundraising: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly, by Mal Warwick/DonorDigital, we have proof of the ways most donor communications fail and the impact of those failures. If you’ve asked for resources to strengthen donor communications and have been turned down or just haven’t found the time to tackle them, this is the kick in the pants you need. These striking findings come from a six-month study of donor communications—both online and offline—from 16 large nonprofits, following online contributions to each organization. Since “multichannel donors are more loyal than single-channel donors,” researchers focused on how much and how well outreach is coordinated across channels for a consistent, recognizable, and satisfying donor experience.What I love about this report is that the researchers share what’s good, bad, and ugly in multiple dimensions so we get an idea of what’s working well (that is, what to strive for and what’s happening in organizations you’re competing with for donor dollars), as well as what’s not. Take a look at these findings:Thank you letters—a reliable cultivation tactic—arrive way too late or not at all. The quickest thank you letter, sent via USPS, arrived in 12 days. The slowest took 28 days. Eight organizations didn’t mail a thank you at all.Most donor communications content is inconsistent—in tone, message, and or/graphics—across channels, so it’s more likely to confuse and annoy recipients than to strengthen loyalty or motivate them to give. Most organizations do reach out to donors via multiple channels.Follow-up appeals via direct mail are frequently implemented, but that second ask can come months after the initial online gift, diminishing its success rate.Sustainer programs (aka monthly giving) provide a strong base of revenue, especially during economic dips, and “new online donors are highly responsive to monthly giving recruitment.” But only one organization integrated its monthly giving ask into mail and email, whereas four didn’t make monthly giving asks at all. There’s much more to learn in the full report, and I recommend that you download it now. Wherever your organization currently sits on the good, bad, and ugly continuum, there’s always room to do donor communications better.With refreshing practicality, Nancy Schwartz rolls up her sleeves to help nonprofits develop and implement strategies to build the strong relationships that inspire key supporters to action. She shares her deep nonprofit marketing insights—and passion—through consulting, speaking, and her popular blog and e-news at GettingAttention.org.last_img read more

What’s the state of your online giving?

first_imgIn our latest Network for Good video clip, I share some key points about the state of online giving. Online donations continue to grow at a faster clip than overall giving as more of our communication and actions go online. As digital natives come into their own and as we see peer fundraising, mobile giving, and events like giving days become nonprofit staples, we expect online giving rates to climb more quickly. To make the most of digitally-minded donors, your online fundraising strategy needs to adhere to these core tenets:Online giving can’t be siloed. Your online fundraising efforts should be tied to your overall fundraising strategy, and integrated with your offline marketing outreach. Make sure your website, email, and social media messages match your direct mail appeals. Your donors’ conversation with you will span more than one channel. Many offline donors will still go online to learn more about you and read about the impact a gift could have. Online giving must be easy. The beauty of technology is that it can make things easier, faster, and more fun. Your donation experience should work to remove any barriers that might prevent someone from giving. Remember: the fewer steps and clicks it takes someone to complete a donation, the more likely they are to give.Online giving should encourage more gifts. In addition to making it easy to give, your donation experience should inspire donors to give more. By offering a compelling story, suggested donation amounts, and recurring giving options, you can increase your overall fundraising totals as well as your average online gift. Need to boost your fundraising results? These resources will help you think through your online strategy:Understand online fundraising patterns by reviewing the Digital Giving Index.Check to see how your online donation experience stacks up with the Donation Page Grader.Learn how to attract more donors with your website, through email, and via mobile and social in our Online Fundraising Survival Guide.Sign up for a free demo of Network for Good’s fundraising software. Our team will give you a full tour and answer your questions about which tools are right for your campaigns.How are you integrating online fundraising at your organization? Chime in below to share your tips and challenges with your fellow readers.last_img read more

Nonprofit Branding Done Right Raises More Money

first_imgWhen it comes to updating nonprofit branding, there can seem be more questions than answers. Questions like:Will rebranding increase donations?Will rebranding make it easier for us to convey our organization’s impact and value?Is now the time for us to rebrand?We finally get answers to these million-dollar questions in The Rebrand Effect: How Significant Communications Changes Help Nonprofits Raise More Money (free download here).This eBook from nonprofit communications agency Big Duck is based on the results of a national survey of 350 nonprofit organizations that rebranded within the last 10 years.For the study, Big Duck defines a comprehensive rebrand as developing or changing four or more of these elements:Brand strategyOrganizational nameTaglineLogoKey messagesElevator pitch.A limited rebrand includes three or fewer of these elements.Here are the highlights of this study and what they may mean for your organization:The Good News: Nonprofits that Rebrand Raise More Money.According to the study, most organizations invest in rebranding in hopes of connecting more quickly and firmly with individual donors and prospects. Statistics show those hopes are the reality for many organizations.Fifty percent of organizations surveyed reported revenue growth, with the greatest increase seen in individual giving. This success rate is particularly striking since many participating organizations were in the process or rebranding, or had done so within the last one to two years, so felt it was too early to assess the impact of those changes.Organizations that Comprehensively Rebrand See Greatest ROI.More than half (56%) of the organizations that completed a comprehensive rebrand saw revenue increase, compared to 41% of organizations that implemented limited rebranding.And the impact of comprehensive rebranding exceed revenue gains. The survey found that organizations making more comprehensive changes are likely to see these additional wins:Greater audience participation, from program registration to activism.Improved staff ability and confidence to communicate effectively about the organization, its impact, and value.More media coverage.Several Factors Influence Rebrand Results.The data shows that results stem from more than the rebrand itself. Organizations that rebrand with any or all of these elements already in place are far more likely to get to goal:New, clear organizational focus or strategic plan (within last 12 months)New leadershipStaff and leadership committed to advancing branding and communications changes.In other words, these factors lead to relevant and robust rebrands. If your organization has any or all of these success factors in place, rebranding may well deliver significant value! Dig into the full report from Big Duck to learn more about if, and how, rebranding done right is likely to move the needle for your fundraising efforts.Bonus: Nonprofit branding is important so don’t ignore it. Are you reflecting your brand in all aspects of your giving experience: Events, donation pages, emails, and peer-to-peer campaigns? If not, we can help. Talk to a rep to learn more.last_img read more

Quality of Antenatal Care in Zambia: A National Assessment

first_imgPosted on January 4, 2013March 21, 2017By: Kate Mitchell, Manager of the MHTF Knowledge Management System, Women and Health InitiativeClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth recently published an article, Quality of antenatal care in Zambia: A national assessment, that classified and assessed the level of ANC services in health facilities in Zambia.Take a look at the abstract:BackgroundAntenatal care (ANC) is one of the recommended interventions to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. Yet in most Sub-Saharan African countries, high rates of ANC coverage coexist with high maternal and neonatal mortality. This disconnect has fueled calls to focus on the quality of ANC services. However, little conceptual or empirical work exists on the measurement of ANC quality at health facilities in low-income countries. We developed a classification tool and assessed the level of ANC service provision at health facilities in Zambia on a national scale and compared this to the quality of ANC received by expectant mothers.MethodsWe analysed two national datasets with detailed antenatal provider and user information, the 2005 Zambia Health Facility Census and the 2007 Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (DHS), to describe the level of ANC service provision at 1,299 antenatal facilities in 2005 and the quality of ANC received by 4,148 mothers between 2002 and 2007.ResultsWe found that only 45 antenatal facilities (3%) fulfilled our developed criteria for optimum ANC service, while 47% of facilities provided adequate service, and the remaining   50% offered inadequate service. Although 94% of mothers reported at least one ANC visit with a skilled health worker and 60% attended at least four visits, only 29% of mothers received good quality ANC, and only 8% of mothers received good quality   ANC and attended in the first trimester.ConclusionsDHS data can be used to monitor “effective ANC coverage” which can be far below ANC coverage as estimated by current indicators. This “quality gap” indicates missed opportunities at ANC for delivering effective interventions. Evaluating the level of ANC provision at health facilities is an efficient way to detect where deficiencies are located in the system and could serve as a monitoring tool to evaluate country progress.Access the PDF of the article here.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Placing Women at the Center: Rethinking the RMNCH Continuum of Care

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 22, 2013June 12, 2017By: Ann Starrs, President and Co-Founder, Family Care InternationalClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is cross-posted from the FCI Blog and the PMNCH website.Last week’s Global Maternal Health Conference (GMHC), held in Arusha, Tanzania, was both inspiring and sobering. Twenty-five years after the Safe Motherhood Initiative was launched at an international conference held in neighboring Kenya, maternal mortality has finally begun to decline, and there are many and diverse examples of how countries are addressing the challenge of preventing deaths of women and newborns from complications of pregnancy, childbirth, and the postnatal period. But as the conference highlighted, huge challenges remain — in improving the quality of care, the conference’s core theme; in strengthening the functionality and capacity of health systems; in addressing major inequities in access to care, within and across countries; and in ensuring that maternal and newborn health receives the political support, increased funding, and public attention that it needs.The majority of the conference’s breakout sessions featured informative and often fascinating presentations on research findings and promising programmatic and technical innovations. One session, however, took a different tack — a debate on “Has the ascendance of the RMNCH continuum of care framework helped or hindered the cause of maternal health?”  I proposed this session to the Maternal Health Task Force, which organized the GMHC, because for me and the organization I head, Family Care International, maternal health has been at the core of our institutional mission since we planned the first Safe Motherhood conference in 1987. For much of the past decade, however, I have been closely involved with the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health (PMNCH) and Countdown to 2015, two coalitions that are dedicated to promoting an integrated, comprehensive approach to the reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) continuum of care. Have our efforts to define and advance the continuum of care framework contributed to progress in improving maternal health? If so, how much? If not, what can be done about it?These questions were debated by a stellar panel I moderated, which included Wendy Graham, Professor of Obstetric Epidemiology at the University of Aberdeen; Marleen Temmerman, the new head of the Department of Reproductive Health and Research at WHO; Friday Okonofua, Professor of Obstetrics and Gynaecology at the University of Benin, Nigeria; and Richard Horton, Editor in Chief of The Lancet, as well as a fantastic and diverse audience. To start the discussion I shared the definition of the continuum of care that PMNCH has articulated, based in part on the World Health Report 2005: a constellation of services and interventions for mothers and children from pre-pregnancy/adolescence, through pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal/postpartum period, until children reach the age of five years. This continuum promotes the integration of services across two dimensions: across the lifespan, and across levels of the health system, from households to health facilities. Key packages of interventions within the continuum include sexuality education, family planning, antenatal care, delivery care, postnatal/postpartum care, and the prevention and management of newborn and childhood illnesses.It is, of course, impossible to conduct a randomized control trial on the impact of the RMNCH continuum of care on maternal health, so the discussion was based more on perceptions than on hard evidence. Nevertheless, there are a few data points to consider in debating the question. From an advocacy perspective, panelists generally agreed, the adoption of the continuum of care framework has helped the cause by appealing to multiple constituencies related to women’s and children’s health. Attribution is always a challenge; there are many other developments over the past 5-7 years that have also had an impact, such as the two Women Deliver conferences held in 2007 and 2010 (with the third one taking place in May of this year). But participants generally agreed that linking women’s and children’s health, and defining their needs as an integrated whole, has appealed to policy-makers and politicians on an intuitive and practical level, as demonstrated by the engagement of heads of state, celebrities, private corporations, and other influential figures.Let’s look at the money: during the period 2003-2010 overseas development assistance (ODA) has doubled for MNCH as a whole, according to Countdown to 2015 (Countdown’s analysis did not look at funding for reproductive health, but a new report later in 2013 will incorporate this important element). Maternal and newborn health, which are examined jointly in the analysis, have consistently accounted for one-third of total ODA, with two-thirds going to child health. Given the significant funding that GAVI has mobilized and allocated for immunization over this time period, the fact that maternal and newborn health has maintained its share of total MNCH ODA is noteworthy.And let’s look at how maternal health has fared within the UN Secretary General’s Every Woman Every Child initiative, launched in September 2010: a recent report summarizes each of the commitments made to Every Woman Every Child in the two years since it was launched. Of the 275 commitments included, 147, or 53%, had specific maternal health content. If we look at the commitments according to constituency group, developing country governments had by far the largest percentage of commitments that had specific maternal health content — 84% — compared to 39% for non-governmental organizations, 24% for donors, and 52% for multilateral agencies and coalitions. Clearly, maternal health has not been marginalized within the continuum from a broad policy, program and funding perspective, despite the fear some had expressed that it would be pushed aside in favor of child health interventions that are perceived as easier and less costly to implement.Another benefit of the continuum of care framework, as noted by Dr. Okonofua, has been increased collaboration among the communities that represent its different elements. While there were tensions and rivalries when PMNCH and Countdown were first established, especially between the maternal and child health communities, today groups working on advocacy, policy, program implementation, service delivery, and research within the continuum generally work together more frequently, cordially and effectively than they did before, especially at the global level. PMNCH and Countdown, as well as Every Woman Every Child, have brought together key players to define unified messages and strategies that have achieved widespread acceptance.That was the good news; but panelists and participants at the session also saw a number of problems with the continuum of care concept. The concern articulated by Richard Horton, and echoed by many of the session participants, was that the continuum views women and adolescents primarily as mothers or future mothers. This narrow view contributes to a range of gaps and challenges; it means crucial cultural, social and economic determinants of health and survival, including female education and empowerment, are not given adequate weight. Gender-based violence deserves much more attention, both for its own sake and for its impact on maternal, newborn and child health. Politically sensitive or controversial elements of the continuum, especially abortion but also, in some cases, family planning and services for adolescents, may be neglected in policy, programming, and resource allocation.The fragmentation inherent in the continuum of care also contributes to what Wendy Graham called the compartmentalization of women. As Countdown’s analysis of coverage has demonstrated, the continuum of care doesn’t guarantee continuity of care; coverage rates are much higher for interventions like antenatal care and child immunization than for delivery or postnatal/postpartum care. Women’s needs for a range of interventions and services, available in a single health facility on any day of the week, are not being met in many countries.Other concerns that emerged during the discussion were that the RMNCH continuum of care framework does not explicitly or adequately reflect the importance of quality of care, which in turn depends on a range of factors: skilled, compassionate health care workers, functional facilities, adequate supplies and equipment, and an effective health information system that tracks not just whether interventions are being provided, but also whether individual women and their families are receiving the care they need throughout their lives.Dr. Okonofua, in his comments, focused on how the continuum of care concept has been implemented, or hasn’t, in countries. The implications of the continuum of care for on-the-ground program implementation have not been fully articulated and communicated; more effort, he noted, needs to be invested in making the concept relevant and useful for policy-makers, program managers, and service providers.Despite these gaps, however, participants in the session – and the panelists themselves – agreed that the continuum of care is a valid and valuable concept, and that the inadequacies identified should be addressed. “Don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater,” said one member of the audience. The continuum of care, as a concept, has already evolved; initially, for example, it did not fully integrate reproductive health elements. As Marleen Temmerman commented, the continuum of care concept is a tool; what is important is what is done with it.As 2015 approaches, the global health community is struggling to articulate a health goal for the post-2015 development framework that will resonate widely and guide accelerated, strategic action to prevent avoidable deaths and improve health of people around the world. The RMNCH community — or communities — needs a framework that more fully reflects the realities and complexities of the lives of women and children, and that enables us to reach out to other health and non-health communities, including HIV/AIDS, NCDs, and women’s rights and empowerment, for a common cause. To do this, we need to revise the continuum of care framework to maximize its relevance and utility for countries, and to incorporate the following missing elements:Recognition of the importance of quality of careResponsiveness to the needs of girls and women throughout the life cycle, not just in relation to pregnancy and childbirthLinks to the cultural, social and economic determinants of women’s and children’s healthRichard Horton’s call for a manifesto to emerge from the GMHC included 10 key points; redefining the RMNCH continuum of care was one of them, inspired by the panel. The challenge has been issued; it is now up to us to meet that challenge.Share this:last_img read more

Discussions at GMHC2013 About Home Births and Traditional Birth Attendants

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 28, 2013March 21, 2017By: Girija Sankar, Director of Haiti Programs, Senior Program Manager, Global Health ActionClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Over 2000 abstracts were submitted to the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013. Eventually, around 800 delegates from all around the world presented papers and posters on maternal health topics under the theme of “Quality of Care”.While all the sessions and plenaries were thought-provoking, some of the sessions that I found especially interesting dealt with home birth attendance and the role of traditional birth attendants (TBAs).Speakers from Nigeria, Pakistan, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and Uganda all highlighted the role that TBAs continue to play in home deliveries. Just because a country’s Ministry of Health dictates that women should deliver at facilities does not mean that women will indeed deliver at facilities. The reality in many of these countries, quite like Haiti, where I work, is that as long as there are significant barriers to safe, affordable and accessible obstetric care, women will continue to turn to other older women whom they know and trust: traditional birth attendants.Presenters from Bangladesh and Nigeria presented findings from promoting the use of clean delivery kits (CDKs) and the consequent impact on improving safe deliveries. The CDKs were promoted through social marketing to families who would then either take the kit to the facility or give it to the TBA for use in home births.We heard from a practitioner in Ethiopia whose organization works with pastoralists in the remote Afar region to improve health outcomes by training TBAs and encouraging women to visit the maternity waiting rooms built close to the referral centers. The group had identified 6 harmful practices that TBAs practiced, often leading to maternal and neonatal deaths. When trained on safe practices, the TBAs realized that what they had been doing in the past may have led to deaths.In Bangladesh, women, after child birth, are often allowed to bleed for a long time owing to the traditional belief that any blood that leaves the woman’s body after child birth is bad blood. The TBAs have since been trained on why that is dangerous for women.Discussions on task-shifting in HRH must acknowledge the role that TBAs continue to play in communities where women do not seek facility-based care for various reasons. If working with the community and women is important, then so is understanding and respecting decisions that women make in why and how they seek services from traditional birth attendants.Prof. Mahmoud Fathalla perhaps said it best when he said “more women have died from child birth than men have died fighting each other in battles.”Learn more about the conference and access the conference presentations at www.gmhc2013.com. Join the conference conversation on Twitter: #GMHC2013Share this:last_img read more

Top 3 Storytelling Essentials for Fundraising

first_imgOnce Upon a Time…Everyone loves a good story. In celebration of National Tell a Story Day, we’re opening up early registration to our May Masterclass Webinar, “How to Tell Stories That Take Supporters from Passive to Passionate.” Discover the four steps to successful storytelling with Julia Campbell, author of Storytelling in the Digital Age: A Guide for Nonprofits.Whether you prefer to curl up with a good book or get lost in a film, the story is what captures our imagination. A good narrative brings people together and forms a common ground; it evokes emotion, sparks passion, and creates empathy.For a nonprofit, a good story can:intrigue journalistsinspire donorsmotivate staff and boardrally supportersignite advocacysecure corporate sponsorshipStories are the basic building blocks for reaching our goals.As fundraisers, you’re responsible for arousing sympathetic emotions and inspiring action. The most powerful way to do that is to tell a great story. But what makes your story great? What do you need to include?The essential elements of any good story are the character, desire, and conflict.CharacterYour protagonist is who your audience relates to. Personalize your organization and mission. Look at your data and find those case studies that can serve as representational stories for the work you do. People are twice as likely to give a charitable gift when presented with an emotion-inducing personal story that focuses exclusively on one character’s plight.DesireWe all want something. What is the desire within your character’s story? Is it a need to change their world, to obtain something, get rid of something, restore order, or escape a threat? Make sure their need is powerful and immediate.ConflictConflict refers to the obstacles that arise and prevent the character from getting whatever she or he wants. Powerful stories about relatable people overcoming challenges inspire the reader (or listener) to help. Tap into those universal human emotions and your audience will engage with you.Particularly when it comes to telling your nonprofit’s origin story—whether you’re discovering how to tell it for the first time, or simply want to refresh your approach—a powerful narrative is the foundation of successful fundraising.Join us for our May webinar “How to Tell Stories That Take Supporters from Passive to Passionate” to explore more tips to create the ideal story for your fundraising.Early registration now open. Sign up today!last_img read more

Happy National Philanthropy Day

first_imgFor over 30 years, November 15 has been a day set aside to celebrate the spirit of philanthropy and the dedicated individuals who work in philanthropic circles. National Philanthropy Day honors the tradition of caring for each other and improving the world.From large foundations to small nonprofits, your impact on communities across the United States is undeniable. Without you, countless animals would go unrescued, children would lose afterschool programming, artistic organizations would fold, and the rights of citizens would be in danger.Imagine that for a minute. What would this world be like without philanthropy?Simply put, philanthropy is “goodwill to fellow members of the human race.” (Thanks, Merriam Webster!) Whether you’re a donor or a nonprofit staffer (or both), that desire to improve a situation and care for others is more than just a fleeting emotion. It’s a way of life. It motivates you in good times and lifts you up in bad.Celebrate PhilanthropyLooking for ways to celebrate National Philanthropy Day this year? Here are three quick, easy things you can do to spread the love.Email—Use your donor management system to send a dedicated email blast to your donors thanking them for their support. Get out the white board or construction paper and write out a “thank you” message. Include a photo of yourself and/or your entire team along with your homemade sign. Share the image on social, too.Social Media—Include posts on social media celebrating your donors and volunteers. They make you’re work possible. Include photos from fundraising receptions and community events. Feature a few of your top donors and long-time volunteers throughout the day. Tag them if possible for added appreciation. Use the hashtag #NationalPhilanthropyDay to join the online conversation.Website—Add a homepage banner image to your website that celebrates National Philanthropy Day and an uplifting call to action. Link to your online donation page. Share the image on social, too.Philanthropy is the backbone of who we are. Whether it’s a financial donation or the gift of time, it feels good to do good. Nonprofits bring people together, unite and inspire us, and improve our daily life. Through conversation, education, events, and performances, your work keeps us connected.And it’s what we love about you. It’s why we do what we do, too.Network for Good believes in the power of small nonprofits. We believe in providing useful resources and a donor management system that improves efficiency. Our goal is to free you up to do the good you do in your community. We’re proud to serve you and your mission.From all of us at Network for Good…Happy National Philanthropy Day!last_img read more

Three Approaches to Improving Maternal Mental Health From a Low-Resource Setting

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on September 17, 2015October 13, 2016By: Shamsa Zafar Rizwan, Professor and Head of Centre of Excellence-MNCH, Health Services Academy, PakistanClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)This post is part of “Mental Health: The Missing Piece in Maternal Health,” a blog series co-hosted by the MHTF, the Mental Health Innovation Network at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine and Dr. Jane Fisher of Monash University.While working as an obstetrician and gynecologist for 20 years and as a reproductive and public health professional, I realized that there is a huge burden of psychosocial ill health of women that also impacts their physical health. Maternal mental health was the key area of my PhD research and I feel that I and professionals from reproductive and maternal health should be leading this cause jointly with mental health professionals.Universal approach to well-beingThe majority of developing countries have a high prevalence of maternal depression ranging from18-25%. Countries with a high prevalence of maternal depression need a universal approach to maternal psychosocial well-being during pregnancy and in the postnatal period. A universal approach means that all women in the perinatal period should receive an intervention on maternal psychosocial well-being, which is integrated into MNCH programs and is simple enough to be delivered by community health workers so as to prevent psychosocial morbidity. This approach does not require screening for depression and anxiety, which is at the moment hard to include in the programmes of LMICs. This approach will not be impacted by mental health stigma and will improve other health outcomes of the mother and child such as child development, growth and health-seeking behaviors. We have tried this approach in Pakistan and have found it to be feasible, easily integrated into MNCH programmes and acceptable by the community and community health workers.Integrate maternal mental health into primary careMaternal mental health interventions need to be integrated into the existing primary health care and maternal and child health programs. Integration has its challenges that include lack of human resources in the community, increased workload and lack of motivation of MNCH community health workers and difficulty garnering political and governmental buy-in. However, advocacy using local data, early involvement of politicians and government and simple, easy to integrate interventions that are developed through a participatory process are key to success.Innovation for scale upScale up of maternal mental health interventions is a challenge, especially where health systems are weak. One major issue is providing quality training and supervision of mental health for community health workers at scale. An innovative way to assist the scale up of evidence-based maternal mental health interventions is a technology-assisted cascade training and supervision system. We are working on developing this innovation in a low-resource, post-conflict area in Pakistan. This system for screening, monitoring and supervision for maternal depression includes three compotents:An interactive voice response-based assessment tool to screen depression in the community: A woman is asked by the health workers to call a toll free phone number where the two questions from the Whooley’s Depression Screen are asked and can determine if further, more detailed screening for maternal depression is neededA tablet-based manual, based on the mhGAP Thinking Healthy Programme: The Thinking Healthy Programme is an intervention that has shown success in treating maternal depression in developing countries and is delivered by community health workers. The use of technology allows standardized training to be delivered without the need of a specialist trainerA cascade training model: Using this model, specialists supervise, from a distance, the community health worker program supervisors, who in turn, supervise the community health workers as part of their normal routine.These innovative approaches to maternal mental health are all designed to enhance the availability to mental health services for the women who need them most.Read more about the scale up of the Thinking Health Programme in a post-conflict settingPhoto: “Rebuilding lives and hope in Pakistan, a year on from the floods” © 2011 Vicki Francis/Department for International Development, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this:last_img read more

Woman who gives free haircuts to Calgarys homeless receives death threats

first_imgTamara PimentelAPTN NewsA Calgary woman who travels around the city giving haircuts to the homeless says her bus was vandalized and she has received death threats.But in spite of that, she’s trying to get back up and running for Christmas.tpimentel@aptn.calast_img

Under pressure over single 7B budget vote Liberals make a tweak

first_imgOTTAWA – The federal government is announcing a slight change to its plan to streamline the spending-approval process into a single $7-billion vote after complaints earlier this week from the parliamentary budget watchdog.Speaking to a House of Commons committee, Treasury Board President Scott Brison says the Liberals’ plan to make the process more transparent will now ensure that the detailed spending allocations laid out in the budget plan are also listed in the bill that MPs will actually vote on.Brison is making the announcement following warnings from parliamentary budget officer Jean-Denis Frechette that the plan to simplify the budgeting process through a single vote could mean $7 billion in new spending commitments from the February budget could technically be spent elsewhere.The PBO warned this week that there was nothing in the wording of the new law to compel Ottawa to spend according to its budget plan — and political opponents, meanwhile, have attacked the plan as a way for the government to open up a $7-billion slush fund.Responding to the budget office concerns, Brison says the argument that budget promises would not be legally binding under the new law is false because straying from the detailed items would be considered an unauthorized use of public funds.Nonetheless, Brison says to add more clarity to the process he will now ensure the full, line-by-line spending table is repeated in the bill that MPs will vote on, rather than just a reference to it.last_img read more

GPS helps RCMP find stolen equipment in Dawson Creek

first_imgTwo men, known to police were arrested and are currently in custody. The investigation is ongoing. DAWSON CREEK, B.C. – A GPS system helped to find stolen equipment in Dawson Creek.On Tuesday, August 14, Beaverlodge RCMP in requested the assistance from the Dawson Creek RCMP with the recovery of stolen heavy equipment. Two skid steers were stolen sometime overnight from Beaverlodge and the GPS was showing the equipment was in the Dawson Creek area.Utilizing satellite imagery an approximate location was determined and police located yellow skid steers that matched the description of the stolen machines. During the investigation, police also recovered four pickup trucks, believed to be stolen, as well as other suspected stolen property.last_img

Canadian Natural reports 961M Q1 profit up from 583M a year ago

first_imgDaily production averaged 1,035,212 barrels of oil equivalent, down from 1,123,546 in the first quarter of 2018.On an adjusted basis, Canadian Natural says it earned 70 cents per diluted share from operations compared with 71 cents per diluted share in the same quarter last year.Analysts on average had expected a profit of 51 cents per share and revenue of $5.25 billion, according to Thomson Reuters Eikon. CALGARY, A.B. – Canadian Natural Resources Ltd. reported a first-quarter profit of $961 million, up from $583 million in the same quarter last year, as it benefited from higher prices due in part to Alberta’s mandatory production curtailments.The oilsands producer says the profit amounted to 80 cents per diluted share for the quarter ended March 31, compared with a profit of 47 cents per diluted share a year ago.Revenue totalled nearly $5.25 billion, down from $5.47 billion in the first quarter of last year.last_img read more

Rahul Priyankas UP rally cancelled over bad weather

first_imgSaharanpur (Uttar Radesh): Congress President Rahul Gandhi and party General Secretary Priyanka Gandhi’s rally in Saharanpur on Monday was cancelled due to bad weather. Both leaders were to address a gathering at the Gandhi Park here to seek support for Congress candidate Imran Masood, who has been fielded from the Saharanpur Lok Sabha seat. Congress office-bearers made the announcement after hours of waiting. The official reason given for the cancellation was bad weather. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The rally was scheduled to start around 11.30 a.m. Campaigning in Saharanpur constituency is being considered significant because of its 42 per cent Muslim population. The Congress has repeated its candidate Masood, who had put up a strong fight in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections but had lost. The SP-BSP-RLD coalition has fielded Bahujan Samaj Party’s Fazlur Rahman from Saharanpur, which includes five Assembly segments — Behat, Saharanpur, Saharanpur Dehat, Rampur Maniharan and Deoband. Voting will take place in Saharanpur on April 11, in the first of the seven phase polling.last_img read more

Can Alabama Afford To Lose

Last Saturday, the Mississippi State Bulldogs — ranked No. 1 in the AP Poll, the Coaches Poll and the College Football Playoff committee’s rankings — lost to the Alabama Crimson Tide 25-20. The loss ruined the Bulldogs’ quest for their first undefeated season since 1940, when they went 10-0-1.But under college football’s new playoff system, which will select four teams to contend for the national championship, a late-season loss by a No. 1 team isn’t as devastating as in years past. Mississippi State, for instance, fell only to No. 4 in the committee’s rankings after it lost to Alabama.It’s less clear whether the Bulldogs control their own destiny. They’ll have another chance to impress the committee when they travel to Oxford, Miss., on Nov. 29 to play No. 8 ranked Mississippi. But they probably won’t play in the SEC Championship and could be leapfrogged by a team (such as Baylor or TCU from the Big 12) that runs the table.The permutations can get intense. To forecast a team’s likelihood of making the playoff, you not only have to account for all plausible outcomes of upcoming football games but also how the set of humans who make up the selection committee might react to those different outcomes. We’re in the midst of investigating these questions and will have some results for you soon.But we’ll start, in this article, with a simple cut of the data: What’s happened, historically, to the ranking of No. 1 teams like Mississippi State when they lose? Could Alabama, the new No. 1, remain in the top four if it loses one of its remaining games?Because the playoff committee is new, we’ll be looking at the historical results from the Coaches Poll for guidance. (We figure the Coaches Poll might be a better proxy for the playoff committee than the AP poll since the committee leans heavily on athletic directors and former coaches.) Here are all the teams since 2002 to have lost a game while ranked No. 1 in the Coaches Poll:No. 1s that lost a regular-season game wound up anywhere from No. 4 to No. 10 after their defeats. That shouldn’t give much comfort to Alabama. Mississippi State’s case was unusual; most regular-season losses knock a No. 1 team out of the top four.What accounts for the different outcomes? Well, it’s complicated. The humans voting in the polls are a little forgiving if the loss comes against another ranked opponent. (No. 1s that lost to a ranked opponent fell to No. 6 on average, versus No. 8 for those that lost to unranked teams.) The margin of defeat may matter some as well. The No. 1s that lost regular-season games by the largest margin — Alabama and Ohio State on consecutive weekends in 2010 — fell to No. 8 and No. 10, respectively.Another factor is whether the year features a deep field of contenders. Part of Ohio State’s steep drop in 2010 may have been because there were an unusually high number of undefeated teams ranked just behind them at the time.Human voters have historically been more forgiving of losses in the conference championship: No. 1s to lose there have fallen to only No. 4 on average. That could be good news for Alabama. Still, this is a small sample with just three examples. Furthermore, the playoff committee claims it will put a particular emphasis on conference championship results.As I said, we’ll be making an effort to sort all this out. It will necessarily come with a lot of probabilities and approximations — this is the first year of the new system and we’re not expecting to identify hard-and-fast rules.There is one rule, however, that has almost always been true. It’s a simple one: A team can’t gain ground by losing.The chart, below, shows what happened to teams ranked throughout the top 25 in the Coaches Poll after they lost a game. (In the chart, read the vertical axis to find a team’s original ranking, then scan across to find the red line, which shows the team’s expected ranking after a loss. The dashed line represents what would happen if a team held its previous position.) Of the 1,133 ranked teams to lose since 2002, only 22 retained their original spot in the rankings. And even fewer — just five teams — improved their position in the poll.This may not be a surprising result, but it tells us something about how human voters react to college football outcomes. As I mentioned, the evidence suggests that voters pay some attention to margin of victory. A definitive win might get a little more credit than a narrow one.But what voters almost never do is reward a team because it loses by less than expected. Say, hypothetically, that No. 24 Gotham Tech travels to No. 3 Gotham State’s home stadium and loses on a last-minute field goal despite having been a 17-point underdog. Your esteem for Gotham Tech should probably improve: That’s a much better showing than you really had the right to expect. But a team’s standing in the polls has almost never improved after an outcome like this; the team has just been punished less. (In this respect, human voters seem to behave a lot like our version of NFL Elo ratings, which account for margin of victory but always prioritize a win over a loss by any margin.)Nor do teams seem to be demoted after narrower-than-expected wins. Take the non-hypothetical case of the 1995 Texas A&M Aggies. On Oct. 14 of that year, they won by just 3 points at home against the SMU Mustangs, an awful team that would go 1-10 that year. If there were ever a time to punish a team for a bad win, this was it. But the Aggies held their position at No. 22 in the polls.The next chart shows the data for ranked teams after wins since 2002. There are a few cases where a team lost ground in the Coaches Poll despite winning — but from what we can tell these were mostly cases where a team was leapfrogged by another that won in more impressive fashion. (That happened to Florida State earlier this year, for example.)There are some other interesting characteristics in these charts. After a loss, teams fall more positions in the poll if they are ranked lower to begin with. While No. 1-ranked teams fall five spots, on average, after a loss, teams ranked No. 15 fall eight positions. This may reflect the fact that teams are more closely bunched together toward the bottom of the Top 25 than toward the top, which is what you’d expect if team skill levels abided by a normal distribution.And a ranked team’s position falls more after a loss than it improves after a win. For example, when the No. 10 team wins a game, it improves only to No. 9, on average. But the same team falls to No. 17 after it loses.This is mainly a reflection of the fact that ranked teams are expected to win. A successful college football season is mostly a matter of running the gauntlet and avoiding upsets. The playoff system gives teams more slack, but not much. read more

Fabianski West Ham eyeing an upset against Spurs

first_imgWest Ham goalkeeper Lukasz Fabianski is hopeful of victory ahead of their London derby with Tottenham on SaturdayAfter enduring a torrid start to the new season, West Ham goes into this weekend’s showdown at the London Stadium with three wins in their last five matches.This includes impressive 3-1 victories over Everton and Manchester United.Now Fabianski hopes that West Ham can cause another upset against their heavily fancied London neighbours Spurs.“It’s another important one, another big one against a tough opponent, but we are playing at home so hopefully with all the hard work during the week we’ll be in good form for Saturday’s game,” Fabianski told the club website.Daniel Fark, Norwich City, Premier LeagueDaniel Farke, From mid-table in the Championship to the Premier League Manuel R. Medina – September 14, 2019 Norwich City manager, Daniel Farke, has taken his team from the middle of the table in the English Championship to play with the big boys in the Premier League.“I’m looking forward to the atmosphere on Saturday. I’ve always enjoyed playing against Spurs – it has a nice atmosphere to it so I’m guessing it won’t be any different.“We just have to prepare ourselves well during the week and have a good game on Saturday, and make sure that the fans will be proud and happy after our performance.“You can see that we have improved, especially playing at home and the recent results here have been very good so hopefully that will continue this Saturday.”West Ham are 15th in the Premier League table with seven points from eight games.last_img read more

Neil Warnock cannot wait for Brexit to happen already

first_imgCardiff City manager Neil Warnock has revealed he cannot wait to see the United Kingdom get out of the European Union, as citizens wait to see how the nation’s Brexit pans out.The details of the UK’s departure from the EU have been a major conversation in the media ever since a slim majority voted in favour of Brexit back in 2016.Now, as the deadline for the referendum approaches the United Kingdom’s parliament remains at a halt, while calls for a second referendum have become louder.It is undoubtedly a topic that demands patience and a lot of sensitivity; however Warnock, known for his blunt public statements insists he can’t wait for the 2016 decision to become a reality.MANCHESTER, ENGLAND - MAY 12: Cardiff manager Neil Warnock celebrates with the fans after the Premier League match between Manchester United and Cardiff City at Old Trafford on May 12, 2019 in Manchester, United Kingdom. (Photo by Stu Forster/Getty Images)Warnock will coach Cardiff City for one more year Manuel R. Medina – May 15, 2019 The manager will guide the Bluebirds in the English Championship, but he will also help the team find his successor.“I think once the country knows what they’re doing, it will be straightforward [to make signings] … Any transfer window is difficult for me, not just this one,” he told reporters, according to Goal.“I don’t know why politicians don’t do what the country wants, if I’m honest.”“They had a referendum and now we see different politicians and everyone else trying to put their foot in it … Why did we have a referendum in the first bloody place?”“I can’t wait to get out of it, if I’m honest. I think we’ll be far better out of the bloody thing. In every aspect.” “Football-wise as well, absolutely. To hell with the rest of the world.”last_img read more

Public Hearings for Police Chief David Nisleit

first_img February 12, 2018 Ed Lenderman, Live at City Hall previewing hearing on selection for new Police Chief pic.twitter.com/tPr7XmVUWJ— Ed Lenderman (@EdLendermanKUSI) February 12, 2018 Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitter Posted: February 12, 2018 Ed Lenderman Updated: 10:49 AM 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsThe public hearings are scheduled for Feb. 12 at 1 p.m.Residents will be able to offer feedback on the appointment of David Nisleit as the city’s next top cop during two City Council meetings later this month, council President Myrtle Cole announced Friday.Mayor Kevin Faulconer on Thursday named Nisleit, a current assistant San Diego police chief, as the successor to Chief Shelley Zimmerman following a nationwide search.Nisleit’s appointment must be confirmed by a majority council vote.feb. 26 at 2 p.m. in the Council Chambers at 202 C St. However, on Friday Faulconer sent Cole a memo requesting the Feb. 12 meeting be moved to 6 p.m. On Twitter, the mayor’s office said he asked for the change “so more San Diegans can attend and have their voices heard.”The council will take a vote on the matter on Feb. 26. KUSI’s Ed Lenderman has the details. Public Hearings for Police Chief David Nisleitlast_img read more