Brazilian Federal Police Seizes 650 Kilograms of Cocaine in Pernambuco

first_imgBy Marcos Ommati/Diálogo May 21, 2020 On April 22, the Brazilian Federal Police (PF, in Portuguese), with the support of Pernambuco’s Military Police Battalion, seized 650 kilograms of cocaine concealed in the cargo compartment of an airplane. The drug was divided into several packages and bags. The operation resulted in the seizure of the aircraft, eight vehicles, a 380-caliber pistol, 12 cell phones, and many documents, according to information from PF’s Office of Public Affairs.The operation was launched at Igarassu Airfield, in the municipality of the same name located 27 kilometers from Recife, capital of Pernambuco state, in Northeast Brazil. Authorities arrested nine people during the operation, including the airplane pilot and a woman who, according to PF, was the leader of the group. The detainees were charged with international narcotrafficking and sent before the Federal Court.According to PF, the drug could have been sent in ship containers to Africa to be distributed in Europe. “When this drug reaches Europe, the value is three times higher than here, so this was very valuable cargo, equivalent to millions of dollars,” said Passos.last_img read more

4 steps to getting a raise

first_imgResearch your valueYour value is your weapon in fighting for a raise. Do research by looking at salaries for comparable jobs in your field. If your job performance is top notch, show evidence of that and provide reasoning for why you’re among the best at what you do.Ask at the right timeFinding the right time to ask for a raise is essential. It’s always a good idea to find a time when your value is high and your superiors know it. Completing a big project or getting new responsibilities are evidence of your worth. Avoid high stress times, like when end of the year reviews are taking place.Practice negotiatingYou may think going over a few things in your head is enough, but it’s always a good idea to practice out loud and practice on someone who (like your boss) will probably debate you. This will help you see where your argument is weak, so you can improve your pitch and go in strong.Be positiveStart off by talking about how much you enjoy working with your company and the work that you’re doing every day. If your employer knows you like where you’re at, they may be more likely to invest in you. 53SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,John Pettit John Pettit is the Managing Editor for CUInsight.com. John manages the content on the site, including current news, editorial, press releases, jobs and events. He keeps the credit union … Web: www.cuinsight.com Detailslast_img read more

Where lending is going in 2018 and beyond

first_imgCredit union loan growth is staying strong in 2018, increasing at a faster rate than last year. This is welcome news for credit unions, as lending likely is a vital component of their service offerings and overall growth strategy. With advances in technology, the lending space is constantly evolving to become faster and more efficient – as a byproduct, it’s also becoming more competitive.Looking ahead to the second half of the year and beyond, here’s what credit unions can expect in the lending space.2018: A Year of ExpansionBecause of the solid economy, loan growth is predicted to remain strong throughout the year. Auto lending and mortgage lending are both steady thanks to low interest rates. The Fed is likely to continue raising interest rates this year, but the competitive rates that credit unions provide will mitigate any potential decrease in overall demand for lending. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading »last_img read more

Poland calls for EU summit on Belarus

first_imgA European official said consultations were underway ahead of a probable statement on the “very serious developments” in Belarus but warned it was “very difficult” to confirm reports from the country because of official restrictions and slow internet.Michel wrote on Twitter that “violence against protesters is not the answer”.”Freedom of speech, freedom of assembly, basic human rights must be upheld,” he said.Belarus borders Russia to the east, Ukraine to the south and EU member states Poland, Lithuania and Latvia to the north and west. In a joint statement on Sunday, Polish President Andrzej Duda and Lithuanian President Gitanas Nauseda had urged Belarus “to fully recognise and uphold basic democratic standards” including freedom of speech.”We are convinced that closer cooperation with the European Union is in the interest of Belarus… and stand ready to continue to provide further support to Belarus in deepening its relations with the united European family,” they wrote. Topics :center_img Poland on Monday called for an emergency European Union summit on the situation in Belarus after clashes in the night in Minsk over a disputed presidential election.”The authorities have used force against their citizens, who are demanding change in the country. We must support the Belarusian people in their quest for freedom,” Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said in a statement.Morawiecki said he had written to European Commission president Ursula von der Leyen and EU Council President Charles Michel with the request for a summit.last_img read more

Shore Conference Boys Volleyball Has Come a Long Way in 15…

first_imgMANAHAWKIN – When you mention volleyball to most Jersey Shore residents it conjures up the thought of ultra-tan men and women romping through the sand on a sunny, 85-degree humid day on the beach in Belmar.Since the AVP professional volleyball tour made its first stop in New Jersey in the early 1980’s, beach volleyball has skyrocketed in popularity, not only as a spectator sport, but as a perfect way to stay in shape and have some fun with hundreds of leagues springing up, up-and-down the Jersey Shore.Volleyball’s origins date back as far as 1895 when a Holyoke, Massachusetts YMCA physical education director, William G. Morgan, combined the game of tennis and handball and called it Mintonette. After an observer, Alfred Halstead, noticed the volleying nature of the game, the game quickly became known as volleyball.The history of Olympic volleyball traces back to the 1924 Summer Olympics in Paris, where volleyball was played as part of an American sports demonstration event. The competition was a success and ultimately it began to be considered for official inclusion and was officially included in the 1964 Summer Olympics. Beach volleyball was added to the Olympic program at the 1996 Summer Olympics with only two players per team.In the fall of 1999, Southern Regional and Long Branch High School started the first girls’ volleyball programs in Shore Conference history with Colts Neck adding a team two years later.Southern Regional boys head coach, Eric Maxwell, followed suit and in the spring of 2000 formed the first boys’ volleyball program in the Shore Conference.“My sister-in-law Cathy Maxwell had started the girls program at Southern and I had just started teaching there,” Maxwell said. “I was in the right place at the right time. The athletic director was considering starting a boys program and asked me what I thought. I had been involved in the sport my whole life so of course I thought it was a great idea.”Now, 16 seasons later, Eric Maxwell is still the head coach at Southern and the Rams (37-2) are the No. 1 ranked team in New Jersey after winning their second consecutive NJSIAA State Championship in 2014 and fourth title in six years.In 2002, Christian Brothers Academy, Colts Neck and Long Branch added boys programs giving birth to Shore Conference boys’ volleyball. The four teams would play each other twice a season, adding additional games out of the area if they could find them, but usually played around ten games a season.It stayed that way until 2005, when Marlboro and Manchester High Schools joined, then in 2007 Howell, Monsignor Donovan, Barnegat, and the three Toms River Schools (North, South and East) were added and the Shore Conference was split into the A North division and the A South division.In 2009, the 12 member schools held the first official Shore Conference Boys Volleyball Tournament pitting Southern Regional against CBA. Southern beat CBA in the inaugural match and the two teams have faced each other in the final every year since with the Rams taking all six titles.Since the 2009 season, an additional 10 teams, including Lacey Township and Pinelands in Class A South and Neptune and Freehold in Class A North have been added along with Central Regional, Wall Township, St. Rose, Red Bank Catholic, Saint John Vianney and Keyport in the newly formed Class A Central.The success of Southern Regional’s volleyball program has drawn a lot of attention to Shore Conference volleyball and because of this you can expect to see additional growth coming out of the Shore in the next couple of years.— By Mike Readylast_img read more

Locals selected to elite Female U18 BC Cup

first_img The Female U18 BC Cup is the first stage in the formation of Team BC which will participate at the 2015 Canada Winter Games in Prince George. The top players selected from the U18 BC Cup advance to the U18 Provincial Camp in Lake Cowichan May 16 – 19. Dawson, McAuley and Huisman are part of the Kootenay Wildcats Female Hockey team.A former Nelsonite, Emma Hare, who now lives in Winfield and played last season with Pursuit of Excellence Hockey Academy in Kelowna, was also selected to the U18 BC Cup.The opening two days of the U18 BC Cup consist of practices, team building and fitness testing. The remainder of the weekend will consist of games where players are evaluated on their performance. BC Hockey’s Female Under 18 level is the third and final stage of the High Performance Program.It is an opportunity for the top players in the Province to train and compete at an elite level and is meant to introduce players to the beginning of the Hockey Canada Program of Excellence.center_img A handful of local female hockey players have been invited to the 2014 Female U18 BC Cup in Salmon Arm from April 23 – 27.Nelson’s Merissa Dawson along with Stephanie McAuley of Trail and Kimberley Huisman of Fernie were invited to the jamboree format event, featuring four teams.last_img read more

From Liliesleaf to Robben Island

first_imgThe farmhouse at Liliesleaf, in a policephoto taken during the raid.(Image: Liliesleaf Trust) Denis Goldberg in the 1960s.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) Denis Goldberg is now retired, and livesin Cape Town.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) Nelson Mandela in the 1960s.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) Nelson Mandela at a 46664 Arctic concertin 2005. The campaign gets its name fromMandela’s prison number, 46664, andraises funds for and awareness ofHIV/Aids.(Image: 4664 Arctic) A police mug shot of Bob Hepple.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) Ahmed Kathrada on the cover of hisautobiography, Memoirs. Walter Sisulu in the 1960s.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) A police mug shot of Andrew Mlangeni.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) A police mug shot of Elias Motsoaledi.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) A police mug shot of Rusty Bernstein.(Image: Historical Papers, University ofthe Witwatersrand) An aerial view of Liliesleaf farm, takenduring the police raid.(Image: Liliesleaf Trust) Police inside the farmhouse during theraid.(Image: Liliesleaf Trust) A radio transmitter found in one of theoutbuildings during the raid was used forthe first broadcast of the ANC’s RadioFreedom.(Image: Liliesleaf Trust)Lucille DavieOn hearing they had received life sentences, Denis Goldberg shouted: “Life! Life is wonderful!”On that day, 12 July 1964, the Rivonia trialists had expected the death penalty. Instead, Judge Quartus de Wet handed down four life sentences to eight of them.“All rationality aside, and for all our preparedness to die for freedom in South Africa, we started smiling in disbelief, at first, and complete relief as it sunk in that when the judge said he would not impose the maximum penalty, even though it would be an appropriate sentence,” says Goldberg 44 years later. “By the time he had finished speaking we were openly laughing. In the end most of us got four life sentences, but in the end, you can only serve one of them!”They would live, but that life would include up to 27 years in jail. They would not see their children grow up, nor would they see their wives struggling to hold things together, dealing with harassment by the security police and imprisonment themselves, sometimes with their children.Eight of the 10 trialists were sentenced to life, while two – Lionel “Rusty” Bernstein and James Kantor – were acquitted. Kantor had been arrested a month after the Liliesleaf raid.Of the original eight, only four are still alive: Nelson Mandela, Denis Goldberg, Ahmed Kathrada and Andrew Mlangeni. Govan Mbeki, Walter Sisulu, Elias Motsoaledi and Raymond Mhlaba have died.Mandela is about to turn 90, Goldberg is 74, Kathrada is 78, and Mlangeni is 81 years old.Liliesleaf farmhouse and the outbuildings in Rivonia, where Mandela lived for a time and where the trialists were arrested and, have been restored, and were opened as a museum on 9 June. With two new buildings on the site, the Liberation Centre and the Liliesleaf Resource Centre, it promises to be an exciting addition to South Africa’s museums.Arrest at LiliesleafIn 1961 the South African Communist Party (SACP) bought Liliesleaf farm, some 25km from the Johannesburg city centre, to use as its headquarters. In those days it was a quiet 28-acre smallholding far outside the city.Goldberg, a civil engineer, describes Liliesleaf as having an “exhilarating atmosphere”.“We ate, slept, dreamed, worked at how to make a revolution,” he says. “That is what we did. That is why it was exhilarating. Buying a kombi, buying a farm, moving house, sorting out weapons manufacture, where to get the things needed, how to buy them, how to transport them, how to train people, endless problems to solve.“Sorting out getting passbooks signed without giving away where we were was a problem.”Mandela lived there in disguise, as a gardener and cook under the name of David Motsamayi. A the former president recalls in his autobiography, Long Walk to Freedom: “The loveliest times at the farm were when I was visited by my wife and family.” He says they were times of more privacy than they ever had at their tiny home in Orlando West, Soweto. “The children could run about and play, and we were secure, however briefly, in this idyllic bubble.”But it was not to last.The top leadership of the African National Congress (ANC) – key alliance partners of the SACP – were arrested at Liliesleaf on 11 July 1963. The apartheid government were smug. They had seized and put away for life the top echelons of the liberation movement, who they had caught hatching Operation Mayibuye, the plan to switch to violence to overthrow apartheid.When the police swooped on the farmhouse they arrested Sisulu, Mbeki, Kathrada, Goldberg, Bernstein, Mhlaba and Bob Hepple. Arthur Goldreich, who was ostensibly the owner of Liliesleaf, drove into the farm shortly afterwards, and was arrested along with the others. Goldreich made a dramatic escape from prison, together with Harold Wolpe, Mosie Moola and Abdulhay Jassat, crossing the border shortly afterwards.Mandela was already on Robben Island, serving a five-year sentence for inciting workers to strike, and for leaving the country without a passport.Mlangeni and Motsoaledi had been arrested on 24 June, and were charged together with the other Rivonia trialists.Hepple acted as lawyer for Mandela in 1962, also representing Sisulu and other ANC and Pan Africanist Congress leaders. He too managed to escape over the border before the trial.Today going under the title of Professor Sir Bob Hepple, retired Emeritus Master of Clare College and Emeritus Professor of Law at the University of Cambridge, he is currently judge of the United Nations Administrative Tribunal, sitting in New York and Geneva. He recounts the events on the afternoon of the arrest.At about 3.15pm, 15 minutes into the meeting, a van was heard coming down the drive.“Govan Mbeki went to the window. He said ‘It’s a dry-cleaning van. I’ve never seen it before.’ Rusty Bernstein went to the window and exclaimed: ‘My God, I saw that van outside the police station on my way here!’“I moved to the open door and saw the panel of the van which read ‘Trade Steam Pressers’. I could see a man wearing a white coat, hat and glasses on the front seat. I pulled the door closed. A few moments later I heard dogs barking. Rusty shouted: ‘It’s the cops; they’re heading here.’“Govan had collected up the Operation Mayibuye document and some other papers and I saw him putting them in the chimney of the small stove in the room. The back window was open, and I helped Govan, Walter Sisulu and Kathy (Kathrada) to jump out of it. There was a second or two as I moved back near the door, with Rusty next to me and Ray Mhlaba sitting next to the window.“The door burst open. Detective Sergeant Kennedy, whom I had cross-examined in a political trial earlier that year, rushed in: ‘Stay where you are. You’re all under arrest.’“He walked up to me with an excited sneer: ‘You’re Advocate Hepple, aren’t you?’Hepple was chair of the youth section of the Congress of Democrats, which was part of the anti-apartheid alliance in the 1950s. He was a member of the secretariat which serviced the central political leadership of the ANC.Hepple says that he had been anxious driving to Liliesleaf, or Lil’s place, as it was called, from his chambers in Johannesburg. “My anxieties led me to stop more than once to ensure that I was not being followed. I took a secondary road to avoid passing the Rivonia police station.”He’d had a visit from a “mysterious man” who had appeared unannounced at his chambers that morning, with a message from leaders in Natal leadership for the central underground leadership. “Ever since Mandela’s arrest there had been suspicions about a possible police spy and lax security in Natal. I feigned ignorance and told him to come back the next day. I intended to check his credentials at our meeting at Lil’s place that afternoon.”The leadership were worried about the police discovering Liliesleaf farm, where they had been secretly meeting and living for the past two years. In fact a new property had been bought, a smallholding called Travallyn in Krugersdorp, and Goldberg had moved into it along with Sisulu, Mbeki, Mhlaba and Wilton Mkwayi. It was to become the new ANC headquarters but the next meeting did not take place there.“It could not take place at Travallyn because that would repeat the security failure of bringing people to the place where the leaders of MK [Umkhonto we Sizwe, the ANC’s armed wing] were living in secrecy,” says Goldberg now, referring to Liliesleaf.“They could not at that moment decide on a safe venue, therefore they decided to have one more meeting at Liliesleaf,” he explains. “It was the pressure of the security police surveillance and the house arrests, banning orders, etcetera, that led to the fateful decision.”Solitary confinement and jailAfter arrest Hepple and the other trialists spent almost four months in solitary confinement. Then he was offered freedom from prosecution if he turned state witness. He agreed to do so but, as soon as he was released from jail, escaped across the border with his wife, making his way to England where his young children and parents joined him later.Hepple, like the others, found his jail time hard going.“In the long hours of isolation and boredom, especially as I lay awake at night on the cold stone cell floor, I became obsessed with our predicament. As the days and nights slowly passed I became increasingly confused and created my own world in which reality and fantasy were hard to separate.“Threats and promises made by the police during continuous periods of interrogation became distorted out of all proportion in my mind and my capacity to reason was seriously impaired.“I say this with hindsight, because one of the consequences of sensory deprivation and exhaustion is that one is unable to realise the extent of the changes taking place in normal behaviour.”Mlangeni spent 26 years in prison, with his fellow Rivonia trialists, on Robben Island. He used simple methods to get through the low moments in prison. “I personally would take out the letters I received from my wife and read them over and over again. Look at the photographs I received and that helped me to get myself together again and go back to my studies.”Mlangeni became a politician on his release, and is still a member of parliament.Goldberg says it took discipline and determination to get through his 22-year prison sentence in Pretoria Central Prison. He did not go to Robben Island like the others because he is white.“I believe it was our self-discipline and determination to uphold our dignity, to demand respect, and that the warders act within their own rules, was the key to survival. We found ways of creating our own little world of politics and social contact that enabled us to support each other.“For myself, too, there was the sense of living time day by day. Time was flexible: at Christmas and New Year another year stretched out ahead, and suddenly it seemed the year was over. This was more so for lifers who had no release date.”He describes waking up at 5am, washing in a hand basin in his cell, using the bucket toilet in his cell, then eating a breakfast of watery mealie meal porridge, with a chunk of bread and coffee, which consisted of burnt mealies and chicory.Days were filled with sewing mailbags in the exercise yard, which was freezing in winter, and burning hot in summer.Lunch was “some kind of stew”, supper was powder soup, bread and coffee. “In total each day we were alone in our cells for 16 to 18 hours each day.”Kathrada says in his book, Memoirs: “Nothing could have prepared me for the enormity of losing all choice in such mundane matters as deciding when to wake up and when to sleep, or comprehend that minor joys such as letter-writing and meetings with family and friends would be so severely curtailed and controlled, and that fundamental human rights would become privileges that had to be earned and were always under threat of removal.”Kathrada has been honoured with awards and honorary degrees. While in prison he obtained several degrees. In 1999 he published his Letters from Robben Island, and is currently working on another book. He is retired but consults to the Nelson Mandela Foundation.The islandMandela describes Robben Island as the “harshest, most iron-fisted outpost in the South African penal system”. Being imprisoned at Robben Island was “like going to another country. Its isolation made it not simply another prison, but a world of its own, far removed from the one we had come from.”Mandela says that in Pretoria Central Prison, from where they were flown immediately upon being sentenced, they had felt connected to their families and supporters. But on the island, although they were together as a group, it was little consolation. “My dismay was quickly replaced by a sense that a new and different fight had begun.”The fight involved the Afrikaans-speaking warders demanding a master-servant relationship. “The racial divide on Robben Island was absolute: there were no black warders, and no white prisoners.”To get through the long hours he dreamed about being able “to go to my office in the morning and return to my family in the evening, to be able to pop out and buy some toothpaste at the pharmacy, to visit old friends in the evening”, he says in Long Walk to Freedom.To help him get through his prison sentence Mandela cultivated a vegetable garden. “I had a garden, which I looked after and when the tomatoes were ready, the warders would be very friendly and come and get some tomatoes from the garden,” he recounts with a mischievous smile in a 2006 interview.It was to be a long, hard 18 years on the island, before being moved to Pollsmoor Prison, then Victor Verster Prison, just outside Cape Town, for nine more years, before being released in February 1990.The world on releaseGoldberg says that the world he entered in 1985 was very different from the one he left in 1964.“The world was different after 22 years. Colours were brighter, everything moved faster. I flew in a jumbo jet. I wasn’t sure of how to deal with the outside world.”Goldberg lived in England after his release, representing the ANC in exile, and continuing his anti-apartheid activities. He settled in Cape Town in 2002, where he become special adviser to the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. He is now retired.Kathrada’s release from prison was marked by “life-changing news” in the form of a simple question: What is a fax?“We had read and heard about this strange new contraption, but none of us had ever seen a fax machine or message, and we simply could not grasp the concept of a sheet of paper being transmitted by telephone, and an exact replica arriving within minutes thousands of kilometres or several continents away.”He was inundated by family and well-wishers when he arrived at his brother’s house in Lenasia, Johannesburg.“Except for a few indelible memories, most of that first day has always been a blank,” he says in Memoirs. “My most precious recollections are of my little grand-nieces and nephews, clambering all over me, clasping their little arms around my neck, holding my hands, hugging and kissing this strange man they had never seen, but had learned to love in absentia.“After 26 years on my own, no other welcome could have meant as much as this spontaneous display of unconditional love and immediate acceptance.”His first television interview brought another surprise discovery. He was confronted with “a cylindrical, black, hairy object that was pushed into my face. I learned very quickly, that day, that this was a ‘boom’, and that I was expected to speak into it.”Mandela had been equally surprised when first confronted with a boom when he walked out of Victor Verster Prison, thinking it a “newfangled weapon” developed while he was in prison.Mandela arrived on Robben Island in the prime of life – he was 44 years old. He left prison as a 71-year-old man.He walked out of Victor Verster Prison on 11 February 1990 to thousands of assembled people, hundreds of photographers, television cameras and journalists. “When I was among the crowd I raised my right fist, and there was a roar,” he says in Long Walk to Freedom. “I had not been able to do that for 27 years and it gave me a surge of strength and joy.”His first night of freedom was spent at Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu’s house in Cape Town. “We were led inside the house, where more family and friends met us but, for me, the most wonderful moment was when I was told that I had a telephone call from Stockholm. I knew immediately who it was. Oliver Tambo’s voice was weak but unmistakable, and to hear him after all those years filled me with great joy.”Mandela and Tambo had been comrades since their student days at Fort Hare University, had set up a legal practice together, and founded the ANC Youth League.Mandela says that in his 27 years in prison, he held “a life-long conversation with him in my head”, and that when Tambo died in 1993, he felt like the “loneliest man in the world”.Mandela was busy after his release. “I began a tour of Africa, which included many countries. During the first six months after my release, I spent more time abroad than at home,” he recounts. “Nearly everywhere I went there were great enthusiastic crowds so that even if I felt weary, the people buoyed me. In Dar es Salaam I was met by a crowd estimated at half a million.”It was reported that a million people greeted him on his ticker tape parade in New York.Mandela is now retired, enjoying his grandchildren and great grandchildren. He will turn 90 on 18 July.Useful linksNelson Mandela FoundationNelson Mandela: reflections on prison lifeRivonia Trial documentsLiliesleaf TrustRobben Island MuseumSouth African History Onlinelast_img read more

The work has begun on growing the economy: Nene

first_img27 May 2014Newly appointed Finance Minister Nhlanhla Nene – the country’s first black finance minster – has his sights fixed on growing the South African economy.Speaking to journalists after being sworn into office in Pretoria on Monday, Nene said the National Development Plan (NDP) laid out ways of improving unemployment and tackling underdevelopment in the country.“The work has begun on growing the economy; we would like to look at investing in infrastructure. We have a solid team working within the Treasury, and we will continue to work as a collective.”On Tuesday, Statistics SA reported that South Africa’s gross domestic product (GDP) had contracted 0.6 percent quarter-on-quarter in the first three months of the year – its first contraction since the second quarter of 2009, when the world’s economy dipped as a result of a global recession.Nene said that Africa was the next big frontier for growth internationally, adding that South Africa would be working with the rest of the continent in driving economic growth.He said he was happy that his appointment had been met with positively. “The reason why there is that positivity is because it signals continuity and stability, especially that the appointment is from within the department.”The South African Chamber of Commerce and Industry (Sacci) welcomed Nene’s appointment. Sacci CEO Neren Rau said on Monday that the National Treasury would be “in the hands of a skilled and experienced leader in Minister Nene. Sacci anticipates a strong partnership with the ministry, as was experienced under Minister Gordhan”.Rau added that former Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan’s move to the portfolio of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs gave him an opportunity to make a difference in the local government sphere, especially in addressing service delivery and local economic development.Nene was a Member of Parliament from 1999 through 2008, serving as co-chairperson of Parliament’s budget committee from 2002 to 2005. He was appointed deputy finance minister in 2008, and served as a member of the local organising committee for the 2010 Fifa World Cup, as well as chairperson of the Public Investment Corporation.Source: SAnews.gov.zalast_img read more

New agriculture practices being standardized

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest It’s been a year since a harmful algal bloom in the Western Lake Erie Basin (WLEB) was brought to national attention when the City of Toledo’s water supply was shut down due to toxins entering its water intake. Record-setting rainfall leading up to the hottest days of summer this year has renewed concerns regarding the quality of Ohio’s rivers, lakes and streams, with forecasts for the bloom to surge in the Great Lake.A variety of potential contributors have been cited for the blooms, including sewage overflow and malfunctioning septic systems, among others. But nutrient runoff from farm fields has drawn the most attention. Phosphorus-based fertilizer is an elemental nutrient needed to help crops grow, but in recent years has made its way into nearby waters after heavy rains.“Though less phosphorus is being applied with increasing efficiency, farmers and agribusinesses in the Western Lake Erie Basin recognize their responsibility to go further to find a solution,” said Chris Henney, president and CEO of the Ohio AgriBusiness Association (OABA). “For the better part of the past two years, swift action has been taken to support education, research and outreach aimed at curbing runoff.”OABA, whose membership includes manufacturers, suppliers and applicators of phosphorus-based fertilizers and other crop nutrients, is one entity partnering with a variety of agriculture and environmental groups, researchers and experts to champion farming practices that improve water quality across the state for the long haul. The association is also a strong supporter of recent Ohio legislation that prohibits application of fertilizers when conditions are most conducive to runoff, and which calls for nutrient applicators across the state to be certified.As administrator of the 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program, OABA, along with key partners such as The Nature Conservancy, The Fertilizer Institute and more, coordinates the education, training, implementation and third-­party auditing for the application of nutrients using the 4R principles of nutrient stewardship.The 4R principles help farmers and agribusinesses take a unified approach to nutrient stewardship by using the right fertilizer source at the right rate, the right time and in the right place.Launched in March 2014, the program has exceeded early goals and expectations. As of late July, the completely voluntary program has recognized 16 certified facilities that service more than 3,000 farm clients and 1.1 million acres of farmland, with commitments from 50 more facilities to become certified.What’s more promising, according to 4R Nutrient Stewardship Certification Program Executive Director Andrew Allman, is that the efforts aren’t just limited to the WLEB. More than 477,000 acres of farmland outside of the WLEB are serviced by retailers and applicators certified through the program.“This shows a serious level of commitment and dedication the industry is taking across the state to help clean up all of its waters, not just Lake Erie,” Allman said.Nationally, The Fertilizer Institute’s 4R Research Fund provides needed resource support with a focus on measuring and documenting the economic, social and environmental impacts of 4R nutrient stewardship.The fund has awarded projects across the country, including $1.2 million last July toward a project that will evaluate the 4R nutrient stewardship concepts in the WLEB by monitoring, modeling and measuring their impacts at the field, watershed and lake scales.“We all live, work, play and drink from Ohio’s water sources, and we all play a role in keeping them clean and safe,” Henney said. “We’re proud of the work we’re doing and the commitment we have to improving our resources for future generations.”Click here to download the 4R infographic.last_img read more

Tabora hopes to help bring back interest in bowling with PSA recognition

first_imgRead Next READ: Krizziah Tabora wins 53rd Bowling World CupThough Tabora can be seen as this era’s torchbearer, she knows that one victory won’t be enough to cement her legacy. So she remains hungry to continue representing the Philippines in every tournament she joins in, including the Asian Games in August in Indonesia.“We’re preparing for that,” said Tabora, who is aiming to bounce back from her forgettable run in the 2017 World Bowling Championships last December.“There’s always going to be pressure, especially after I won in the Bowling World Cup. I admit that I was pressured in the World Championships and that’s why I wasn’t able to perform. But we’re preparing for the next challenges,” she said. “In bowling, you can’t say who will perform well in any tournament. It’s really unpredictable, so you have to be prepared.”ADVERTISEMENT Typhoon Kammuri accelerates, gains strength en route to PH View comments Ancajas: Next Manny Pacquiao hasn’t been born yet John Lloyd Cruz a dashing guest at Vhong Navarro’s wedding Families in US enclave in north Mexico hold sad Thanksgiving Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university PLAY LIST 01:29Police teams find crossbows, bows in HK university01:35Panelo suggests discounted SEA Games tickets for students02:49Robredo: True leaders perform well despite having ‘uninspiring’ boss02:42PH underwater hockey team aims to make waves in SEA Games01:44Philippines marks anniversary of massacre with calls for justice01:19Fire erupts in Barangay Tatalon in Quezon City AFP official booed out of forum LOOK: Iya Villania meets ‘Jumanji: The Next Level’ cast in Mexicocenter_img Pussycat Dolls set for reunion tour after 10-year hiatus MOST READ Brace for potentially devastating typhoon approaching PH – NDRRMC Google honors food scientist, banana ketchup inventor and war hero Maria Orosa LATEST STORIES Krizziah Lyn Tabora is nothing but grateful for all the accolades coming her way after winning the women’s championship in the 2017 QubicaAMF Bowling World Cup.“Until now, I can’t believe that I’m one of the awardees. I thought after the World Cup, that’s already the best award I could get, but I’m surprised that I got a prestigious award like this,” she said after being recognized as one of the three Athletes of the Year in the SMC-Philippine Sportswriters Association Awards night on Tuesday.ADVERTISEMENT READ: A night of sports heroesKrizziah Tabora. Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netTabora was only the sixth bowler to be bestowed the honor following legends like Paeng Nepomuceno, Bong Coo, Ariane Cerdena, CJ Suarez, and Biboy Rivera, and the first since Rivera in 2010.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSWATCH: Drones light up sky in final leg of SEA Games torch runSPORTSLillard, Anthony lead Blazers over ThunderSPORTSMalditas save PH from shutoutThe 26-year-old believes that this distinction could help her bring the public’s interest back to the sport of bowling.“This honor is big not just for me, but for Philippine bowling as well. We’re putting bowling back to the people’s consciousness because of my win and I hope we could continue growing because of all of these,” she said. Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more