Khade fails to qualify for 100m freestyle finals

first_imgAfter ending India’s 24-year-old medal drought in the pool in Asian Games, teen swimming sensation Virdhawal Khade topped his 100m freestyle heats but the effort was not good enough to fetch a place in the finals of the event.Khade, who clinched a 50m butterfly bronze yesterday to become the first Indian swimmer in 24 years to clinch an Asian Games medal, clocked 51.25sec to top the 100m freestyle heats today but the eventual eight qualifiers returned timings of under 51 seconds.The 19-year-old Indian’s effort was not even his personal best in this event which stands at 49.47sec, clocked at the Commonwealth Youth Games in Pune in 2008.The other Indian in the event, Aaron Agnel Dsouza finished second behind Khade by clocking 52.71sec.In the men’s 200m individual medley, Rehan Poncha failed to qualify for the finals after finishing sixth in the heats with a timing of 2:08.55sec.With inputs from PTIlast_img read more

The magic two words that will get people to retweet you

first_imgDan Zarrella is one of my favorite thinkers on social media, because he mines massive amounts of data and bases his recommendations on hard science. This is relatively rare yet needed in the field of social media marketing, and so he’s well worth following.He recently analyzed 2.7 million tweets and concluded the following that people retweet when they are asked nicely as part of the original tweet. Conclusion? If you have something you want people to spread, ask them – with a pretty please.last_img

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Just Released: Updated Digital Giving Index

first_imgThe latest release of Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index provides a snapshot of online giving for the first half of this year. This update looks at $71 million in donations to 20,000 charities on Network for Good’s online donation platform from January to June 2013. Check out the full infographic below, or visit Network for Good to view the index and all of our previous updates. Thanks to our friends at Event 360 for partnering with us to analyze this data.last_img

Fundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer Fundraising

first_imgFundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer FundraisingPeer fundraising, also called peer to peer fundraising, has become a popular way to raise money, but it is also exceptionally useful for spreading the word about your cause. In addition to meeting your nonprofit fundraising goals, you also gain new supporters.How Peer Fundraising WorksYour existing supporters become your first line of outreach in a peer fundraising campaign. As with any fundraiser, you begin with your plan. Then, instead of just sending out your appeal, you also send out a request to forward your information, share on social media, etc. to your supporters’ own personal networks. With minimal effort, you are able to turn your supporters into advocates for your cause and have them help raise the money your organization needs.Keep It SimpleBecause you are so passionate about your cause, your organization, and fundraising, it can be tempting to provide your supporters with too much information. Your supporters can get easily overwhelmed if they feel like they are being asked to do anything that’s too involved. Therefore, ensure your peer fundraising materials are more simplified than what you might present otherwise.You still need to make a strong case, and nothing does that better than engaging stories. Make it clear with your heading that it is a story, and use a layout that indicates a quick read, as opposed to an academic presentation of the “facts,” so that people will be drawn in and not be afraid they don’t have the time to read it now.Peer Fundraising Is an Online EndeavorInclude links to your donation page wherever it’s appropriate. If your organization gains a supporter, but she can’t figure out how to contribute, then the effort was wasted. Your supporters know that they are asking for money and their friends recognize the technique by now.Taking advantage of peer fundraising has enabled even very small nonprofit fundraising efforts to reach huge numbers of people. Don’t be afraid to get your feet wet in this new, and fun, approach!Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your peer fundraising efforts. Call us today at 1-855-229-1694 to learn more!last_img read more

GMHC2013: Stay Tuned to the Live-stream!

first_imgPosted on January 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference is right around the corner! In an effort to engage a broad audience, the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the three plenaries will be live-streamed and archived. In addition, all conference sessions will be archived and available for viewing within 24 hours of presentation time.Stay tuned to www.gmhc2013.com to access the live-stream and archived videos.View the conference program here.About the conference:GMHC2013 is a technical conference for practitioners, scientists, researchers, and policy-makers to network, share knowledge, and build on progress toward eradicating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by improving the quality of maternal health care.The conference is co-sponsored by Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the Maternal Health Task Force at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.GMHC2013 will be held at the Arusha International Conference Center in Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013.Interested in guest blogging?Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! The MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about the issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are interested in sharing a guest post, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to post on your own blog or your organization’s blog. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Join the conversation on Twitter! #GMHC2013Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

9 Ways to Save Lives Through Maternal and Newborn Health Integration

first_imgPosted on March 9, 2015October 27, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)At a standing room only event last week at The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, global experts gathered to discuss the need for, barriers to, and the way forward for maternal and newborn integration. But what is integration and why is it so desperately needed?Every year approximately 300,000 women and 5.5 million newborns, including stillborns, die needlessly. The causes of these deaths are often similar since the mother and her newborn are inextricably linked both socially and biologically.For the panel, Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits Across a Lifetime, Ana Langer, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force; Joy Riggs-Perla, Director of Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children; Alicia Yamin, Policy Director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights and Kirsten Gagnaire, Executive Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA), presented the health, rights, and technological advantages to integrating maternal and newborn health financing, policies, training, and service delivery.Why is integration important?A woman’s health before conception, during pregnancy, and after her baby is born has a direct impact on the health of her child and the rest of her family. “Biologically the health, the nutritional status, and the well-being of the mother in general strongly influence the chances of survival and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy, the newborn later and even older children,” shared Langer. Since a woman is the primary caretaker of her family, if her health suffers, everyone is affected.Recent research from Dr. Yamin quantifies this impact. In South Africa, Tanzania, Malawi, and Ethiopia, if a mother dies during pregnancy or childbirth, there is a 50-80% chance that her newborn will die before reaching his first birthday. The impact of the death of the mother also reached far into the future. When a mother dies there are higher rates of family dissolution; early drop out of school, especially for girls; and nutritional deficits.What are the challenges to integrating?Although it is easy to see how the health of the mother would directly affect the health of her fetus, newborn and children, integrated care is rarely seen. Maternal health, newborn health, and child health are siloed as separate initiatives across the health care spectrum: from the policy, donor, financing and monitoring levels to the academic, health system, program and NGO levels. But these problems are seen beyond the program and country level. These “challenges also happen at the global level, failing to provide an enabling environment for those changes at the country level to happen. So too often, we see that different initiatives are either targeted to mothers or to babies and don’t make a good enough effort to bring them closer together,” shared Langer.Divisions in providing maternal and newborn health include separate pre-service training in maternal and newborn health for health care workers, rare HIV-testing and treatment of an infant if the HIV-positive mom dies in childbirth and separate global initiatives, among many others. These persistent separations have created a dearth of evidence of how best to implement integrated maternal and newborn care.Key areas that remain segregated are ministries of health and data collection systems. Joy Riggs-Perla shared that “there’s often a separation [of maternal and newborn health] organizationally in a Ministry of Health… That can cause problems with program coordination. It can cause problems where one or the other gets more or less emphasis. And so that can actually lead to problems in service delivery.” In addition, Riggs-Perla addressed the crucial need to collect data on both mothers and newborns so that programs and health systems recognize and synchronize their approaches to improve health outcomes along the continuum of care. “I think the bottom line in all of this is that if people think about care from a client-centered perspective, or a client-oriented perspective, you naturally come to the continuum of care. And that helps solve some of these problems. Too many of our health services are organized at the convenience of the providers,” concluded Riggs-Perla.An additional barrier to integration may be societal discrimination. “Ultimately maternal mortality is the culmination of layers of structural, and discrimination, and exclusion that women face in society. And often women and children face or experience their poverty and marginalization through their context with indifferent and dysfunctional health systems,” shared Yamin.How to break silosIn order to provide comprehensive care that benefits both the woman and her child, current silos in maternal and newborn health need to dissolve.MAMA is working to bring integrated information to pregnant women and mothers precisely when they need it. Through mobile technology, both text and voice messages are used to provide timed and targeted information during pregnancy through their child’s third birthday. These messages are specific to the local context and language and include a wide range of information from nutrition during pregnancy and breastfeeding to cognitive development and immunizations for their children.Another programmatic example is from the TSHIP project in Nigeria, where misoprostol and chlorhexidine are now distributed together by community health workers: misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in women and chlorhexidine to prevent umbilical cord infection in newborns.The panel provided many potential solutions to the chasm in maternal and newborn health:Integrated national costed plans of action: “[Integration is] very, very difficult if it doesn’t start at the beginning: once budgets are separated, programs are designed, job descriptions are formed” and integration is nearly impossible – Yamin.Integrated pre-service training of health care providersIntegrated performance and health outcome indicatorsExcluding initiatives that are narrow, categorical and verticalInitiatives that strengthen health systemsPrograms that allow for flexibility and learning, both in activities and fundingDiverse partnerships: “We are increasingly finding ourselves needing to work in a partnership way: in public-private partnerships, bringing in UN agencies, bringing in the host country governments, bringing in bilateral funders, foundations and [the] corporate It takes a tremendous amount of aligning of agendas and understanding how each of these different sectors and entities works, and what their perspectives are. [But,] ultimately I think we get better results from it.” – GagnaireWhile these strategies are promising, there is still a lack of research on integration and so information exchange is key. In order to address this need, Dr. Langer shared news of the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, which will “provide a space for information exchange, for productive debate and for discussion about maternal and newborn health and how to bring it closer together.”For more details from this event, continue to follow our blog this week to hear more details from Joy Riggs-Perla, Alicia Yamin, Kristen Gagnaire, and Ana Langer. Also, to learn more about integration, check out our MNH Integration Blog Series.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Celebrating One Year Since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference

first_imgWatch experts share their insights from GMNHC 2015 and ideas for next steps in maternal newborn health | Global Maternal Newborn Health: Current Progress and Future DirectionsNews stories from GMNHC 2015:UN set new targets to protect more moms, babiesCCTV America | June 2016Gates, Slim target maternal, newborn health in Central AmericaMichael O’Boyle, Reuters | October 2015Are we winning against maternal and infant mortality?Azad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Q&A: Mother-infant health progress requires no magicAzad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Melinda Gates’ keys to leadership (Las claves de Melinda Gates para el liderazgo)CNN TV | October 2015Melinda Gates: Still work to do in maternal, newborn healthChristopher Sherman, Associated Press | October 2015For more information, please visit:GMNHC 2015 websiteMHTF blog seriesMHTF events pageCommentary on the PLOS blog—Watch other videos from the MHTF.Don’t miss out on special announcements about upcoming events! Subscribe to receive updates from the MHTF.Share this: Political leadership should act on strong scientific evidence and empower the public.Global and national health communities must integrate strategies, services and funding streams.Reaching the most vulnerable, including adolescents, is an urgent priority.Maternal newborn survival efforts should improve maternal morbidities, stillbirths and child development.Increasing investments to improve quality of maternal newborn health services is necessary.Providers have an obligation to treat women with compassion and respect.Universal access to integrated sexual and reproductive health care is essential.Addressing gaps in measurement, information and accountability is key for assessing progress.Sharing success in maternal newborn health is an opportunity to strengthen health programs.Supporting all providers, especially midwives, is imperative. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Did you miss the conference? Videos of many of the sessions are available for you to watch online:Welcome Event | Julio Frenk, Christopher Elias, Pablo Kuri Morales, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Geeta Rao GuptaOpening Ceremony | Ana Langer, Mercedes Juan López, Melinda Gates, Babatunde OsotimehinKeynote Address | Hans RoslingThe Next Frontier: Approaches to Advance the Quality of Maternal Newborn Health Care | Ana Langer, Richard Horton, Fernando Althabe, Address Malata, Mouzinho Saide, Vinod PaulBenefiting Mothers and Newborns through Integrated Care | Koki Agarwal, Zulfiqar Bhutta, Joy Lawn, Nosa Orobaton, Jane Otai, Pronita Rani Raha, José VillarAddressing Equity and Reaching the Most Vulnerable Mothers and Newborns | Joy Riggs-Perla, Alain Damiba, Carolyn Miles, Anuradha Gupta, Cesar Victora, Alicia Ely YaminFAIL: First Attempt in Learning – Learning from What Doesn’t Work in Maternal and Newborn Health | Katja Iversen, Priya Agarawal, Sharad Agarwal, France Donnay, Margaret Kruk, Richard HortonMeasurement and Accountability: Better Data for Better Decision Making | Robert Clay, Muhammad Baharuddin, Agbessi Amouzou, Shams El Arifeen, Peter WaiswaFunding for Impact: Global Financing for Maternal and Newborn Health | Katie Taylor, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Roberto Tapia Conyer, Dinesh Nair, Mariam Claeson, Charles MwansamboClosing Ceremony | Mary Nell Wegner, Mary Kinney, Katja Iversen, Mary Mwanyika-Sando, Koki Agarwal, Joy Riggs-Perla, Ana Langer Posted on October 18, 2016January 6, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Exactly one year has passed since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, an event organized by the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) in collaboration with USAID’s flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program, Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children and other partners. Researchers, policymakers, funders, implementers and other stakeholders from around the world gathered in Mexico City to share new evidence, identify knowledge and implementation gaps, build inter-disciplinary consensus and discuss strategies for integrating and improving global maternal newborn health.Conference participants proposed ten critical actions necessary to create momentum for maternal newborn health:last_img read more

Diabetics Warned to Reduce Risk of Eye Disease

first_img Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals. Story Highlights Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults. Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease. Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults.Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease.“If diabetics can control their blood sugar and their blood pressure, there’s a good chance that their eyes or their vision will not worsen. You are more likely to get eye disease if your blood sugar is out of control,” she pointed out.Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals.The study looked at the incidence of DR; the knowledge, beliefs and practices of diabetic patients; and the severity of visual problems among diabetics.One recommendation from the local study is for an annual dilated eye examination for all diabetic patients. Dr. Mowatt said that this should be standard practice, although that has not been the case in Jamaica. She noted that there is a significant presence of DR cases in the country.One key finding from the study, she said, was that male patients were more likely to have poor blood sugar and blood pressure control, resulting in more severe visual loss.Dr. Mowatt stressed that it is important for diabetics to be screened for DR as soon as they are diagnosed, so that medical care providers can pick up any disease process and start treatment early.She cited a major study in the United Kingdom that looked at over 500 Type Two diabetic patients and found that 39 per cent of them had eye disease at the time of diagnosis. “This means that when many people are diagnosed with diabetes they already had eye disease,” she noted.“DR is one of the leading causes of blindness in the young population, and it is not a disease of the elderly. It is a disease of the working-class people in their thirties, forties and fifties, and it is preventable,” she reiterated.Dr. Mowatt said that diabetics also need to be more vigilant about comorbidity, which is the presence of other chronic diseases.“We looked at blood sugar control (of diabetics) and it was significant that almost 87 per cent of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension where the blood pressure was greater than 130/80, which is the ideal blood pressure for a diabetic,” she pointed out. The research findings were presented at the seventh staging National Health Research Conference in 2016.last_img read more

Women’s Centre a Story of Triumph – Minister Grange

first_img The Minister’s remarks were delivered by Executive Director of the WCJF, Dr. Zoe Simpson, during a recent ceremony at the entity’s Trafalgar Road headquarters in St. Andrew to hand over 10 copies of a book titled ‘Triumphs’ to the girls. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the programme of the Women’s Centre of Jamaica Foundation (WCJF) is a story of “triumph”, enabling girls who drop out of school on account of pregnancy to continue their education.“Through the work of the WCJF, over 47,000 adolescent mothers have triumphed over their circumstances,” she said.The Minister’s remarks were delivered by Executive Director of the WCJF, Dr. Zoe Simpson, during a recent ceremony at the entity’s Trafalgar Road headquarters in St. Andrew to hand over 10 copies of a book titled ‘Triumphs’ to the girls.The book, written by journalist Garfield Angus, is a gift from law firm Lex Caribbean Jamaica. It is a collection of short stories about personal struggles and victories.Minister Grange said she is happy for the donation at a time when the Centre celebrates its 40th anniversary. The WCJF was established in 1978 as a response to the high rate of adolescent pregnancies in Jamaica.Dr. Simpson, in her own remarks, said that the inspirational stories contained in the book will help to foster a spirit of resilience and motivate the reader to push on to success.“The adolescent mothers are faced with challenges of their own. I am, therefore, delighted that the girls will be able to benefit from the publication that will motivate them to overcome their challenges,” she noted.She added that the stories are positive reminders that “just like Martin in the ‘Hard Road to Success’, Jamaicans do not succumb to adverse situations, but, instead, just like Antoinette in ‘Life without Dependency’, we work hard and remain determined to live out our dreams”.Dr. Simpson thanked the author of the book and Lex Caribbean for making the donation possible.“We all need inspiration in our lives to help us understand and maximise our full potential,” she said. “Through the work of the WCJF, over 47,000 adolescent mothers have triumphed over their circumstances,” she said. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the programme of the Women’s Centre of Jamaica Foundation (WCJF) is a story of “triumph”, enabling girls who drop out of school on account of pregnancy to continue their education. Story Highlightslast_img read more