The magic two words that will get people to retweet you

first_imgDan Zarrella is one of my favorite thinkers on social media, because he mines massive amounts of data and bases his recommendations on hard science. This is relatively rare yet needed in the field of social media marketing, and so he’s well worth following.He recently analyzed 2.7 million tweets and concluded the following that people retweet when they are asked nicely as part of the original tweet. Conclusion? If you have something you want people to spread, ask them – with a pretty please.last_img

The Right Way to Use Stock Images

first_imgHow do I look for good photos?Stock photo sites host thousands of images— and you probably won’t find the best photo on your first attempt. Don’t get discouraged! For best results, ask yourself these questions before searching for that perfect photo that fits your idea of “woman, pink hat, outdoors”:1. What kind of photo am I looking for?Do you want an illustration, an up-close photo of a face, a wide shot of someone head to toe?2. What elements must be in the photo?Is this an invite to a fundraising gala or a 5K? Should the woman wearing a pink hat be in running gear or a formal dress with a pink feathery piece topping off the look?3. What emotion am I trying to capture or elicit in this photo?Are you trying to portray a breast cancer survivor after treatment or an energetic young woman finishing a 5K on behalf of your cause?4. Where am I going to use this photo?Whether you use the image for print, web or both makes a big difference in the resolution and e file size you’ll need. Don’t know which medium the photo will end up in? As a general rule, download the largest image you can afford. That way, you can use the image for a variety of mediums without any resolution issues.5. How do I know if this is a good image or not?Save a few of the images you like (download a sample or take a screenshot) and make a note of where you found them (include the ID number) so you can locate them later. Show them to your staff, volunteers or a loyal donor to see if the image captures the message you’re trying to convey.6. Do I have to use the entire image?If half the image meets all your needs but the random dog on the other side doesn’t add any value, crop it out. Beware: some sites don’t allow editing of images in any way.Dos and Don’ts Don’t use a stock image with a testimonial or a quote; it will diminish your credibility.Do use stock images that feature real people in natural settings (avoid white backgrounds).Don’t use random stock images that have nothing to do with your mission or organization.Do download a higher quality image if you plan to use it in a print piece in the future. You can always make a photo smaller but a low resolution image will never look good enlarged or in print.Don’t modify images unless you have the skills and expertise to do so. People can usually spot inconsistencies and know it’s an altered image.Do download royalty-free images to keep costs downDo read a site’s terms and conditions carefully. Some sites have very specific requirements on how the image can be used.Do select imagery with people taking some sort of action—especially one that reinforces your mission.Do select images that have high-contrast colors. It will catch the viewer’s eye and be better seen by the sight impaired.Don’t select images of people wearing current fashion trends if you don’t plan to change your photos frequently. These images tend to quickly look outdated and this perception can transfer to how people perceive your brand.Do select images with diversity. Our world is diverse; make sure you pick images of people who reflect different ages, genders and races. There’s not much that can stand-in for beautiful images of your organization’s work. But we know there are times when stock images might be your only option for adding visual interest to your nonprofit website, newsletter or fundraising appeal. This is especially true for new nonprofits, organizations that don’t have a photo-savvy staffer or NPOs who can’t afford to hire a pro. For organizations that work with children, victims of abuse or other issue areas where privacy is a concern, stock images can be a great solution when visuals are needed.Let’s face it: Stock images can look generic and incredibly fake. (How many women do you know who casually laugh while eating salad by themselves?) But there are some ways to find quality photos that fit your criteria and help tell your story. Follow our simple dos and don’ts for using stock images and learn how to find the best photos for your message.Here are a two examples of good and bad stock images: 1. Call for volunteers—bad example White background Nothing to do with the organization’s mission Not a lot of contrast in color Not capturing a real world situation2. Call for volunteers—good example (for a clean-up)Real people in a real settingHigh contrast in colorPeople are taking actionDiversity is represented3. Join our email list—bad exampleUnnatural settingNo action is taking placeUnless an animal shelter offers typing classes for canines, this has nothing to do with the organization’s mission4. Join our email list—good example (for an animal shelter)High contrast in colorsPhoto is in a real settingLooks genuineWhere can I look for good photos?Many websites sell photos:iStockphotoBig Stock PhotoPunchstockShutterstockIf you don’t want to buy an image, try your luck with Flickr’s Creative Commons gallery. Flickr, one of the largest communities for online photo sharing, has developed an online photo gallery that gives photographers the ability to share free, high-quality, downloadable images with minimal licensing requirements.Our friends at TechSoup have compiled a helpful list of sites that offer free photos for use. TechSoup also explains the basics for using images you find on the internet (when you have permission and when you don’t).last_img read more

Just Released: Updated Digital Giving Index

first_imgThe latest release of Network for Good’s Digital Giving Index provides a snapshot of online giving for the first half of this year. This update looks at $71 million in donations to 20,000 charities on Network for Good’s online donation platform from January to June 2013. Check out the full infographic below, or visit Network for Good to view the index and all of our previous updates. Thanks to our friends at Event 360 for partnering with us to analyze this data.last_img

Fundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer Fundraising

first_imgFundraising for a Cause? Look into Peer FundraisingPeer fundraising, also called peer to peer fundraising, has become a popular way to raise money, but it is also exceptionally useful for spreading the word about your cause. In addition to meeting your nonprofit fundraising goals, you also gain new supporters.How Peer Fundraising WorksYour existing supporters become your first line of outreach in a peer fundraising campaign. As with any fundraiser, you begin with your plan. Then, instead of just sending out your appeal, you also send out a request to forward your information, share on social media, etc. to your supporters’ own personal networks. With minimal effort, you are able to turn your supporters into advocates for your cause and have them help raise the money your organization needs.Keep It SimpleBecause you are so passionate about your cause, your organization, and fundraising, it can be tempting to provide your supporters with too much information. Your supporters can get easily overwhelmed if they feel like they are being asked to do anything that’s too involved. Therefore, ensure your peer fundraising materials are more simplified than what you might present otherwise.You still need to make a strong case, and nothing does that better than engaging stories. Make it clear with your heading that it is a story, and use a layout that indicates a quick read, as opposed to an academic presentation of the “facts,” so that people will be drawn in and not be afraid they don’t have the time to read it now.Peer Fundraising Is an Online EndeavorInclude links to your donation page wherever it’s appropriate. If your organization gains a supporter, but she can’t figure out how to contribute, then the effort was wasted. Your supporters know that they are asking for money and their friends recognize the technique by now.Taking advantage of peer fundraising has enabled even very small nonprofit fundraising efforts to reach huge numbers of people. Don’t be afraid to get your feet wet in this new, and fun, approach!Network for Good has a blog with more free information on how to be successful at nonprofit fundraising. We also have specialists available to discuss how we can help you get the most out of your peer fundraising efforts. Call us today at 1-855-229-1694 to learn more!last_img read more

GMHC2013: Stay Tuned to the Live-stream!

first_imgPosted on January 7, 2013June 21, 2017Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference is right around the corner! In an effort to engage a broad audience, the opening and closing ceremonies as well as the three plenaries will be live-streamed and archived. In addition, all conference sessions will be archived and available for viewing within 24 hours of presentation time.Stay tuned to www.gmhc2013.com to access the live-stream and archived videos.View the conference program here.About the conference:GMHC2013 is a technical conference for practitioners, scientists, researchers, and policy-makers to network, share knowledge, and build on progress toward eradicating preventable maternal mortality and morbidity by improving the quality of maternal health care.The conference is co-sponsored by Management and Development for Health, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania, and the Maternal Health Task Force at the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, USA.GMHC2013 will be held at the Arusha International Conference Center in Tanzania, January 15-17, 2013.Interested in guest blogging?Are you presenting at the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013 in Arusha, Tanzania? Do you plan to tune in to the live stream to view sessions remotely?Join the team of guest bloggers for the conference! The MHTF is looking forward to a lively online scientific dialogue about the issues presented at the conference sessions. In an effort to fuel this conversation, we hope to engage a variety of perspectives–from various geographic regions and sub-fields–by connecting with health and development bloggers around the world.You might be interested in writing a guest blog post if:You would like to connect with a broader audience about the work you are presenting at GMHC2013,You work in global health and development and would like to share your thoughts on how the issues discussed in the sessions relate to your work in your specific context,You are working on similar issues to those discussed in the sessions, and would like to share your insights,You have a passion for global health and writing, and would like to help synthesize lessons learned from the sessions.Guest posts will be posted on the MHTF Blog and cross-posted on a number of other leading sexual and reproductive health, development, and global health blogs.If you are interested in sharing a guest post, please contact Kate Mitchell (kmitchel@hsph.harvard.edu).Please also get in touch if you plan to post on your own blog or your organization’s blog. We would love to discuss linking to your posts and cross-posting content.Join the conversation on Twitter! #GMHC2013Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

9 Ways to Save Lives Through Maternal and Newborn Health Integration

first_imgPosted on March 9, 2015October 27, 2016By: Katie Millar, Technical Writer, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)At a standing room only event last week at The Forum at Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, global experts gathered to discuss the need for, barriers to, and the way forward for maternal and newborn integration. But what is integration and why is it so desperately needed?Every year approximately 300,000 women and 5.5 million newborns, including stillborns, die needlessly. The causes of these deaths are often similar since the mother and her newborn are inextricably linked both socially and biologically.For the panel, Putting Mothers and Babies First: Benefits Across a Lifetime, Ana Langer, Director of the Maternal Health Task Force; Joy Riggs-Perla, Director of Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children; Alicia Yamin, Policy Director of the François-Xavier Bagnoud Center for Health and Human Rights and Kirsten Gagnaire, Executive Director of the Mobile Alliance for Maternal Action (MAMA), presented the health, rights, and technological advantages to integrating maternal and newborn health financing, policies, training, and service delivery.Why is integration important?A woman’s health before conception, during pregnancy, and after her baby is born has a direct impact on the health of her child and the rest of her family. “Biologically the health, the nutritional status, and the well-being of the mother in general strongly influence the chances of survival and well-being of the fetus during pregnancy, the newborn later and even older children,” shared Langer. Since a woman is the primary caretaker of her family, if her health suffers, everyone is affected.Recent research from Dr. Yamin quantifies this impact. In South Africa, Tanzania, Malawi, and Ethiopia, if a mother dies during pregnancy or childbirth, there is a 50-80% chance that her newborn will die before reaching his first birthday. The impact of the death of the mother also reached far into the future. When a mother dies there are higher rates of family dissolution; early drop out of school, especially for girls; and nutritional deficits.What are the challenges to integrating?Although it is easy to see how the health of the mother would directly affect the health of her fetus, newborn and children, integrated care is rarely seen. Maternal health, newborn health, and child health are siloed as separate initiatives across the health care spectrum: from the policy, donor, financing and monitoring levels to the academic, health system, program and NGO levels. But these problems are seen beyond the program and country level. These “challenges also happen at the global level, failing to provide an enabling environment for those changes at the country level to happen. So too often, we see that different initiatives are either targeted to mothers or to babies and don’t make a good enough effort to bring them closer together,” shared Langer.Divisions in providing maternal and newborn health include separate pre-service training in maternal and newborn health for health care workers, rare HIV-testing and treatment of an infant if the HIV-positive mom dies in childbirth and separate global initiatives, among many others. These persistent separations have created a dearth of evidence of how best to implement integrated maternal and newborn care.Key areas that remain segregated are ministries of health and data collection systems. Joy Riggs-Perla shared that “there’s often a separation [of maternal and newborn health] organizationally in a Ministry of Health… That can cause problems with program coordination. It can cause problems where one or the other gets more or less emphasis. And so that can actually lead to problems in service delivery.” In addition, Riggs-Perla addressed the crucial need to collect data on both mothers and newborns so that programs and health systems recognize and synchronize their approaches to improve health outcomes along the continuum of care. “I think the bottom line in all of this is that if people think about care from a client-centered perspective, or a client-oriented perspective, you naturally come to the continuum of care. And that helps solve some of these problems. Too many of our health services are organized at the convenience of the providers,” concluded Riggs-Perla.An additional barrier to integration may be societal discrimination. “Ultimately maternal mortality is the culmination of layers of structural, and discrimination, and exclusion that women face in society. And often women and children face or experience their poverty and marginalization through their context with indifferent and dysfunctional health systems,” shared Yamin.How to break silosIn order to provide comprehensive care that benefits both the woman and her child, current silos in maternal and newborn health need to dissolve.MAMA is working to bring integrated information to pregnant women and mothers precisely when they need it. Through mobile technology, both text and voice messages are used to provide timed and targeted information during pregnancy through their child’s third birthday. These messages are specific to the local context and language and include a wide range of information from nutrition during pregnancy and breastfeeding to cognitive development and immunizations for their children.Another programmatic example is from the TSHIP project in Nigeria, where misoprostol and chlorhexidine are now distributed together by community health workers: misoprostol to prevent postpartum hemorrhage in women and chlorhexidine to prevent umbilical cord infection in newborns.The panel provided many potential solutions to the chasm in maternal and newborn health:Integrated national costed plans of action: “[Integration is] very, very difficult if it doesn’t start at the beginning: once budgets are separated, programs are designed, job descriptions are formed” and integration is nearly impossible – Yamin.Integrated pre-service training of health care providersIntegrated performance and health outcome indicatorsExcluding initiatives that are narrow, categorical and verticalInitiatives that strengthen health systemsPrograms that allow for flexibility and learning, both in activities and fundingDiverse partnerships: “We are increasingly finding ourselves needing to work in a partnership way: in public-private partnerships, bringing in UN agencies, bringing in the host country governments, bringing in bilateral funders, foundations and [the] corporate It takes a tremendous amount of aligning of agendas and understanding how each of these different sectors and entities works, and what their perspectives are. [But,] ultimately I think we get better results from it.” – GagnaireWhile these strategies are promising, there is still a lack of research on integration and so information exchange is key. In order to address this need, Dr. Langer shared news of the upcoming Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, which will “provide a space for information exchange, for productive debate and for discussion about maternal and newborn health and how to bring it closer together.”For more details from this event, continue to follow our blog this week to hear more details from Joy Riggs-Perla, Alicia Yamin, Kristen Gagnaire, and Ana Langer. Also, to learn more about integration, check out our MNH Integration Blog Series.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Celebrating One Year Since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference

first_imgWatch experts share their insights from GMNHC 2015 and ideas for next steps in maternal newborn health | Global Maternal Newborn Health: Current Progress and Future DirectionsNews stories from GMNHC 2015:UN set new targets to protect more moms, babiesCCTV America | June 2016Gates, Slim target maternal, newborn health in Central AmericaMichael O’Boyle, Reuters | October 2015Are we winning against maternal and infant mortality?Azad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Q&A: Mother-infant health progress requires no magicAzad Essa, Al Jazeera | October 2015Melinda Gates’ keys to leadership (Las claves de Melinda Gates para el liderazgo)CNN TV | October 2015Melinda Gates: Still work to do in maternal, newborn healthChristopher Sherman, Associated Press | October 2015For more information, please visit:GMNHC 2015 websiteMHTF blog seriesMHTF events pageCommentary on the PLOS blog—Watch other videos from the MHTF.Don’t miss out on special announcements about upcoming events! Subscribe to receive updates from the MHTF.Share this: Political leadership should act on strong scientific evidence and empower the public.Global and national health communities must integrate strategies, services and funding streams.Reaching the most vulnerable, including adolescents, is an urgent priority.Maternal newborn survival efforts should improve maternal morbidities, stillbirths and child development.Increasing investments to improve quality of maternal newborn health services is necessary.Providers have an obligation to treat women with compassion and respect.Universal access to integrated sexual and reproductive health care is essential.Addressing gaps in measurement, information and accountability is key for assessing progress.Sharing success in maternal newborn health is an opportunity to strengthen health programs.Supporting all providers, especially midwives, is imperative. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Did you miss the conference? Videos of many of the sessions are available for you to watch online:Welcome Event | Julio Frenk, Christopher Elias, Pablo Kuri Morales, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Geeta Rao GuptaOpening Ceremony | Ana Langer, Mercedes Juan López, Melinda Gates, Babatunde OsotimehinKeynote Address | Hans RoslingThe Next Frontier: Approaches to Advance the Quality of Maternal Newborn Health Care | Ana Langer, Richard Horton, Fernando Althabe, Address Malata, Mouzinho Saide, Vinod PaulBenefiting Mothers and Newborns through Integrated Care | Koki Agarwal, Zulfiqar Bhutta, Joy Lawn, Nosa Orobaton, Jane Otai, Pronita Rani Raha, José VillarAddressing Equity and Reaching the Most Vulnerable Mothers and Newborns | Joy Riggs-Perla, Alain Damiba, Carolyn Miles, Anuradha Gupta, Cesar Victora, Alicia Ely YaminFAIL: First Attempt in Learning – Learning from What Doesn’t Work in Maternal and Newborn Health | Katja Iversen, Priya Agarawal, Sharad Agarwal, France Donnay, Margaret Kruk, Richard HortonMeasurement and Accountability: Better Data for Better Decision Making | Robert Clay, Muhammad Baharuddin, Agbessi Amouzou, Shams El Arifeen, Peter WaiswaFunding for Impact: Global Financing for Maternal and Newborn Health | Katie Taylor, Ariel Pablos-Méndez, Roberto Tapia Conyer, Dinesh Nair, Mariam Claeson, Charles MwansamboClosing Ceremony | Mary Nell Wegner, Mary Kinney, Katja Iversen, Mary Mwanyika-Sando, Koki Agarwal, Joy Riggs-Perla, Ana Langer Posted on October 18, 2016January 6, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Exactly one year has passed since the 2015 Global Maternal Newborn Health Conference, an event organized by the Maternal Health Task Force (MHTF) in collaboration with USAID’s flagship Maternal and Child Survival Program, Saving Newborn Lives at Save the Children and other partners. Researchers, policymakers, funders, implementers and other stakeholders from around the world gathered in Mexico City to share new evidence, identify knowledge and implementation gaps, build inter-disciplinary consensus and discuss strategies for integrating and improving global maternal newborn health.Conference participants proposed ten critical actions necessary to create momentum for maternal newborn health:last_img read more

Diabetics Warned to Reduce Risk of Eye Disease

first_img Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals. Story Highlights Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults. Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease. Persons who have diabetes are being warned to control their blood sugar to reduce the risk of getting diabetic retinopathy (DR). DR is an eye condition that affects blood vessels in the retina, which is the structure that lines the back of the eye. It is the most common cause of vision loss among people with diabetes and the leading cause of vision impairment and blindness among working-age adults.Speaking at a JIS Think Tank on Wednesday (January 30), Consultant Ophthalmologist and Senior Lecturer at the University of the West Indies (UWI), Dr. Lizette Mowatt, explained that failure to control blood pressure and blood sugar causes a higher risk of progression of the disease.“If diabetics can control their blood sugar and their blood pressure, there’s a good chance that their eyes or their vision will not worsen. You are more likely to get eye disease if your blood sugar is out of control,” she pointed out.Dr. Mowatt, who is President of the Ophthalmological Society of Jamaica (OSJ), also shared some of the findings from research done to determine the burden of DR and to reduce the stress on hospitals.The study looked at the incidence of DR; the knowledge, beliefs and practices of diabetic patients; and the severity of visual problems among diabetics.One recommendation from the local study is for an annual dilated eye examination for all diabetic patients. Dr. Mowatt said that this should be standard practice, although that has not been the case in Jamaica. She noted that there is a significant presence of DR cases in the country.One key finding from the study, she said, was that male patients were more likely to have poor blood sugar and blood pressure control, resulting in more severe visual loss.Dr. Mowatt stressed that it is important for diabetics to be screened for DR as soon as they are diagnosed, so that medical care providers can pick up any disease process and start treatment early.She cited a major study in the United Kingdom that looked at over 500 Type Two diabetic patients and found that 39 per cent of them had eye disease at the time of diagnosis. “This means that when many people are diagnosed with diabetes they already had eye disease,” she noted.“DR is one of the leading causes of blindness in the young population, and it is not a disease of the elderly. It is a disease of the working-class people in their thirties, forties and fifties, and it is preventable,” she reiterated.Dr. Mowatt said that diabetics also need to be more vigilant about comorbidity, which is the presence of other chronic diseases.“We looked at blood sugar control (of diabetics) and it was significant that almost 87 per cent of the patients had uncontrolled hypertension where the blood pressure was greater than 130/80, which is the ideal blood pressure for a diabetic,” she pointed out. The research findings were presented at the seventh staging National Health Research Conference in 2016.last_img read more

Women’s Centre a Story of Triumph – Minister Grange

first_img The Minister’s remarks were delivered by Executive Director of the WCJF, Dr. Zoe Simpson, during a recent ceremony at the entity’s Trafalgar Road headquarters in St. Andrew to hand over 10 copies of a book titled ‘Triumphs’ to the girls. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the programme of the Women’s Centre of Jamaica Foundation (WCJF) is a story of “triumph”, enabling girls who drop out of school on account of pregnancy to continue their education.“Through the work of the WCJF, over 47,000 adolescent mothers have triumphed over their circumstances,” she said.The Minister’s remarks were delivered by Executive Director of the WCJF, Dr. Zoe Simpson, during a recent ceremony at the entity’s Trafalgar Road headquarters in St. Andrew to hand over 10 copies of a book titled ‘Triumphs’ to the girls.The book, written by journalist Garfield Angus, is a gift from law firm Lex Caribbean Jamaica. It is a collection of short stories about personal struggles and victories.Minister Grange said she is happy for the donation at a time when the Centre celebrates its 40th anniversary. The WCJF was established in 1978 as a response to the high rate of adolescent pregnancies in Jamaica.Dr. Simpson, in her own remarks, said that the inspirational stories contained in the book will help to foster a spirit of resilience and motivate the reader to push on to success.“The adolescent mothers are faced with challenges of their own. I am, therefore, delighted that the girls will be able to benefit from the publication that will motivate them to overcome their challenges,” she noted.She added that the stories are positive reminders that “just like Martin in the ‘Hard Road to Success’, Jamaicans do not succumb to adverse situations, but, instead, just like Antoinette in ‘Life without Dependency’, we work hard and remain determined to live out our dreams”.Dr. Simpson thanked the author of the book and Lex Caribbean for making the donation possible.“We all need inspiration in our lives to help us understand and maximise our full potential,” she said. “Through the work of the WCJF, over 47,000 adolescent mothers have triumphed over their circumstances,” she said. Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, Hon. Olivia Grange, says the programme of the Women’s Centre of Jamaica Foundation (WCJF) is a story of “triumph”, enabling girls who drop out of school on account of pregnancy to continue their education. Story Highlightslast_img read more

Worst intersections in Fort St John

first_imgFORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – ICBC has released their numbers for the worst intersections in Fort St. John.Data posted by ICBC is as of March 31, 2018, and includes all crash types including casualty crashes resulting in injury or fatality and property damage accidents.#100 crashes – 100 St & Hwy 97N & Turning lane#91 crashes – 100 Ave & Hwy 97N & Old Fort Road & Turning lane#76 crashes – 100 Ave & 100 St#67 crashes – 93 Ave & 96 St & 96A St#63 crashes – 108 St & 109 St & Hwy 97 N & Turning lane#60 crashes – 100 St & 93 AveTo view the crash scale; CLICK HERElast_img

Rahul Priyankas UP rally cancelled over bad weather

first_imgSaharanpur (Uttar Radesh): Congress President Rahul Gandhi and party General Secretary Priyanka Gandhi’s rally in Saharanpur on Monday was cancelled due to bad weather. Both leaders were to address a gathering at the Gandhi Park here to seek support for Congress candidate Imran Masood, who has been fielded from the Saharanpur Lok Sabha seat. Congress office-bearers made the announcement after hours of waiting. The official reason given for the cancellation was bad weather. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM’ The rally was scheduled to start around 11.30 a.m. Campaigning in Saharanpur constituency is being considered significant because of its 42 per cent Muslim population. The Congress has repeated its candidate Masood, who had put up a strong fight in the 2014 Lok Sabha elections but had lost. The SP-BSP-RLD coalition has fielded Bahujan Samaj Party’s Fazlur Rahman from Saharanpur, which includes five Assembly segments — Behat, Saharanpur, Saharanpur Dehat, Rampur Maniharan and Deoband. Voting will take place in Saharanpur on April 11, in the first of the seven phase polling.last_img read more

Over 2 lakh seats to be added in varsities under EWS quota

first_imgNew Delhi: Over 2 lakh additional seats will be created in 158 Central Educational Institutions (CEIs) across the country to implement 10 per cent reservation for the Economically Weaker Section, with the Union Cabinet giving a go ahead on Monday, sources said.The Union Cabinet chaired by Prime Minister Narendra Modi on Monday approved the provisions of reservations in admission for EWS students in Central Educational Institutions. According to sources, the HRD Ministry had sought the permission of the Election Commission before moving the proposal in the Cabinet, as the Model Code of Conduct has been enforced ahead of Lok Sabha elections. Also Read – Uddhav bats for ‘Sena CM'”With the approval of the Cabinet, a total of 2,14,766 additional seats will be created. While 1,19,983 additional seats will be created during 2019-20 academic session, 95,783 seats will be added in 2020-21,” sources said. A sanction of Rs 4315.15 crore has been approved for the 158 CEIs for implementation of reservation in admission to students belonging to EWS. The Rajya Sabha on January 9 approved amending the Constitution to provide 10 per cent reservation to general category poor in jobs and education, with the government terming the landmark move as “slog over sixes”. Also Read – Farooq demands unconditional release of all detainees in J&KThe quota will be over and above the existing 50 per cent reservation to Scheduled Castes, Scheduled Tribes and Other Backward Classes (OBCs). In pursuance of 103rd Constitutional Amendment and guidelines of Ministry of Social Justice and Empowerment (MoSJE) to provide for 10 per cent reservations for EWS category, without adversely affecting the proportionate reservations for SC/ST an SEBC and also not reducing the seat availability in General category, the HRD Ministry had issued instructions in January this year to all CEIs to increase the intake of students in all branches of study. The interim budget for 2019-20 also provided for an increase of 25 per cent of all seats in CEIs.last_img read more

Ohio State field hockey set for Big Ten tournament quarterfinal vs Northwestern

OSU sophomore forward Maddy Humphrey (23) during a game against California on Oct. 25 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU won 6-3. Credit: Robert Scarpinito | Copy ChiefOhio State field hockey is set to face fourth-seeded and No. 17 Northwestern in the opening game of the Big Ten Tournament, where the winner will move on to compete against top-seeded Maryland or eighth-seeded Michigan State.Northwestern (12-7, 4-4) and OSU last met less than a month ago when they squared off at Buckeye Varsity Field in a game in which the Wildcats scored once in each half. Those two goals were enough to defeat OSU in shutout fashion, 2-0. OSU hopes to increase offensive pressure this time around, coach Anne Wilkinson said.“We can’t give up the amount of shots we’ve given up in the past,” Wilkinson said. “We haven’t generated enough attacks and been able to sustain them so we need to take more shots and challenge more of these goalkeepers.”Sophomore forward Morgan Kile said one of the main components going into the tournament is putting all of the pieces together one last time. “I think the key thing for our team going into the tournament is to put all the skills and things we’ve worked on throughout the season together,” Kile said. “We need to really show Northwestern what we can do out there.”The Buckeyes will enter the tournament with three players being awarded All-Big Ten honors. Senior co-captains Peanut Johnson and Emma Royce, along with sophomore forward/midfielder Maddy Humphrey, were bestowed the awards after their efforts this season. Johnson, Humphrey, Royce and Kile have all registered double-digit points, with Johnson and Humphrey being the fourth-highest scoring duo in the Big Ten this year with 53 total points. This year will be the Buckeyes’ 20th all-time appearance in the Big Ten tournament. Thrice they have taken home the Big Ten title. In 2001 and 2010, OSU was a co-champion, while it captured the outright crown in 2006. The last time OSU and Northwestern squared off against each other in the tournament was in 2013. In that game, Johnson registered a goal and an assist, pushing the Buckeyes to a 3-2 victory against the then-No. 13 Wildcats.In order to post another win this time around, Wilkinson said teamwork will be critical.“The most important thing is we have to play together,” Wilkinson said. “Sometimes they take too much on themselves and put too much weight on their individual ability. We just need to rely on each other and play as a team, and the results will take care of themselves. We have to work hard, which they have.”OSU and Northwestern are set face off at 10 a.m. on Thursday in Bloomington, Indiana. Defensive gainsOSU has given up 18 fewer goals this year — 56 last season compared to 38 in 2015 — as well as allowing 21 fewer shots (280 in 2014, 259 in 2015) and 10 fewer penalty corners (124 in 2014, 114 in 2015). Sophomore goalie Liz Tamburro finished the season with 124 total saves. She ranks second in the conference with 6.88 saves per game.Game results when OSU…Scores first: 7-0Leads at the half: 5-0Trails at the half: 2-9Is tied at the half: 2-0Outshoots its opponent: 4-3Is outshot: 5-6Is in a one-goal game: 4-2Is in a two-goal game: 5-7Heads to overtime: 1-1 read more

Ohio State field hockey loses 2nd straight game

Sophomore forward Brooke Hiltz (6) marks an opposing player during a game against Penn State on Sept. 28 at Buckeye Varsity Field. OSU lost, 4-3.Credit: Grant Miller / Copy chiefBehind two goals from senior forward Jenna Chrismer, Penn State field hockey outlasted Ohio State, 4-3, Sunday afternoon at Buckeye Varsity Field.OSU senior co-captain and midfielder Kaitlyn Wagner made the game interesting late when she converted on a penalty stroke with 7:50 left to play in regulation to cut Penn State’s lead to one.The Buckeyes (3-6, 0-2) couldn’t climb the ladder, however, and were unable to break through in the game’s final minutes.Freshman midfielder Maddy Humphrey created the penalty stroke after she dribbled down the field and was tackled inside the scoring circle. She subsequently had to leave the game due to a right leg injury, but returned with less than four minutes to play.OSU had one final gasp when junior back and co-captain Emma Royce fired on goal off a penalty corner with a little more than five minutes left, but redshirt-senior goalie Kylie Licata made a diving stop to preserve the game for Penn State (8-2, 2-1).Despite the valiant effort toward the finish, OSU coach Anne Wilkinson said Sunday the game was lost in the opening minutes against the two-time defending Big Ten champions.“We could have (done) a lot better job in the first 15-20 minutes of setting the tone and playing strong defense,” Wilkinson said. “We need to be able to take charge in the (defending) circle.”Royce said the team’s mindset must change in order to dictate the pace from the start of each game.“I think the best way we can stay focused for the first 15 (minutes) is instead of ball watching, focusing on our tempo and keeping possession of the ball,” she said. “The reason why we get turned over in our back third in the early 15 is because we give away the ball too easily. So it’s more attention to detail, which I think is the key.”It took Penn State just 2:41 to get on the board when Chrismer scored off an assist from senior forward Taylor Herold from three yards out.Less than eight minutes later, with the score 2-1, Chrismer connected again off a pass from sophomore midfielder Carly Celkos.“I think we need to mentally prepare beforehand, have good warm-ups,” OSU junior forward Peanut Johnson said. “It starts there because I think it’s taking us a little bit of time to be on our game, which can’t happen.”In the second half, OSU struggled with Penn State’s size and the pressure they put on the ball. The Buckeyes found it hard to get into scoring position, recording five shots in the second period.Penn State had a 4-2 advantage in penalty corners in the second half. Penn State sophomore back Emilee Ehret converted off one a little more than 10 minutes into the frame with assists from Herold and senior forward Laura Gebhart. And Ehret’s goal proved to be the difference maker in the end.Herold’s three assists Sunday put her one point away from 100 in her Penn State career.The Buckeyes are set to go on the road for three consecutive games to start October against Maryland, Virginia and Rutgers. OSU is set to face Maryland on Friday in College Park, Md., at 3:30 p.m. read more

Chris May sparks Ohio State mens lacrosse from the faceoff X

Senior midfielder Chris May (left) is widely considered the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterWhile snow continues to fall as March begins on Ohio State’s campus, in the lacrosse world, all signs point to May.Chris May, that is, who is now the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.The Buckeyes fell just short of a win against Marquette on Sunday, losing 10-9, and while the team went 1-1 on the weekend in Louisville, Ky., May went 32 of 39 on the weekend in faceoffs, earning the Big Ten Specialist of the Week for the third time this season. And though he is more successful than ever, the graduate transfer has a “pretty crazy story” about his journey from Georgetown University to his first season with OSU.“My senior year, I was only in pads for a few practices,” he said. “I was coming off a shoulder injury when I tore my Achilles tendon … Once I got hurt, I started focusing on my future and graduate school. I’ve been a Buckeye fan my whole life … I realized I only had one shot to do this, so I really worked hard.”At Georgetown, he only stepped onto the field for 22 games, but now after just six with the Buckeyes, May has won 75 percent of his faceoffs and snagged 60 ground balls, thriving in a position named aptly for the precise skill set it requires.“It’s a unique position,” OSU assistant coach Jamison Koesterer said. “It’s mental, just hearing the whistle, finding a rhythm between what he hears and what he needs to execute physically … It definitely takes athleticism, but it also takes savvy, a little bit of poise and IQ to understand and anticipate where the ball might come out.”May’s success at the midfield X results not only from a consistent process, but also an unwavering support from his team, enabling him to aid the offense in taking the ball to the net.“A lot goes into it, but I just try to get a good reaction off the whistle and fight for the ball,” May said. “We’ve got a lot of great offensive players. A lot of guys who can score, but they can’t score if they don’t have the ball … But it’s a group effort, we have a great unit. It’s a great dynamic.”Although May is the new kid on the block with the Buckeyes, former high school teammate and OSU senior captain David Planning said he enjoys feeding off May’s familiar energy.“He’s such an easy guy to play with,” Planning said. “He knows what his job is. It makes it a lot easier on the offense and the defense.”With a lacrosse resume stronger than most of his younger OSU teammates, May assimilated quickly. He assumed a leadership role, but admitted his teammates teach him a few things too.“Being older than a lot of the guys, I feel like I have more experience,” May said. “I’m trying to be a role model for the younger guys, but I’m still learning a lot from the older guys too.”And while May continues to fine-tune his craft at the X, the rest of the Buckeyes look to learn from the loss at Marquette, revisiting the drawing board but “hungry” to return to the field.“We’re getting back to the basics on both sides of the ball,” coach Nick Myers said. “There’s always a desire coming off a loss wanting to look at what went wrong and how to fix it. Tuesday, we practiced in the pouring rain for two hours and these guys didn’t blink an eye … It’s a long wait till Saturday whenever you lose, so they’re excited.”The Buckeyes stand at the threshold of an uphill climb, facing three top 20 opponents before heading into conference play, but Planning said the team isn’t focusing on the opposition.“Our focus is on us,” Planning said. “We want to dictate the tempo and the style of play, and that starts with us.”With that goal in mind, Planning, May and the rest of the Buckeyes are set to move to Ohio Stadium on March 7 to take on Hofstra at 1 p.m. read more

Borough Introduces Resolution Opposing Soldotna Annexation Proposal

first_imgIn a memo to the assembly, while we recognize that the City of Soldotna has devoted a lot of time, funds, and effort into considering and developing its plan to annex adjacent property, we oppose implementing the plan without seeking voter approval. The affected property owners are not all voters, but all voters in the existing limits of the City of Soldotna and who reside in the proposed areas for annexation will be impacted by the annexation if it is approved. These are all borough residents and in our view the assembly has a duty to consider this issue and convey to the city its support of these residents’ concerns, wrote Pierce and Blakeley. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Peninsula Borough Assembly will be looking at a resolution opposing the City of Soldotna’s plan to annex adjacent properties without voter approval. The Soldotna City Council recently approved a resolution which directs the City Administration to prepare a draft petition for annexation of seven areas according to the policies and procedures of the Local Boundary Commission for Annexation by Legislative Review, which would not allow the residents to vote on this issue The resolution will be introduced by Kenai Peninsula Borough Mayor Charlie Pierce, and Assemblymember Norm Blakeley, at the meeting on September 4.last_img read more

Fermilab documenting construction of NOvA—next generation neutrino experiment w video

first_imgThe NOvA experiment uses two detectors: a 222 metric-ton near detector at Fermilab and a much larger 15 metric-kiloton far detector (pictured here) in Minnesota just south of the U.S.-Canada border. Scientists will detect a small fraction of the neutrinos in a near-detector at Fermilab and in a larger far-detector in Minnesota looking for signals that the neutrinos are changing from one type to another on their trip. Citation: Fermilab documenting construction of NOvA—next generation neutrino experiment (w/ video) (2014, February 3) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-02-fermilab-documenting-novanext-neutrino-video.html More information: www-nova.fnal.gov/ Fermilab sends first neutrino beam to NOvA experiment Explore further Neutrinos are subatomic particles, electrically neutral and still rather mysterious. Scientists believe that studying them may help lead to fully understanding what everything in the universe is ultimately made of—may physicists believe that unlike other particles, neutrinos don’t get their mass from the famous Higgs boson . Another unique thing about neutrinos is that they don’t interact much with other regular matter, instead they tend to pass right through it—billions of them are passing through each of us every second.To better understand neutrinos, researchers would like to know what happens to them as they travel, that’s what’s behind NOvA—a project that has an international team of physicists, engineers, technicians and even students building a massive two part experiment. The first part is essentially a neutrino gun—located in Batavia, Illinois—it will create neutrinos and fire them at the second site located in Ash River, Minnesota—it’s over 500 miles away which means the neutrino beam will have to travel through portions of the Earth to get there. Upon arrival, the neutrinos will be captured by a very large (14,000 ton) piece of plastic that has been fashioned into liquid filled chambers, each with neutrino detecting gear.By all measures it’s a massive project, and Fermilab clearly wants the public to know where its tax dollars are being spent. They’ve hired video professionals to not only document the construction of the two facilities, but to interview many of the people involved in the effort, from physicists, to site managers to students volunteering to help. (Phys.org) —Fermilab, run by the U.S. Department of Energy is going to great lengths to document and make known the work that is being done to build the country’s next generation neutrino experiment—a twin campus endeavor known as NOvA that will shoot neutrino’s from one site to another located over 500 miles apart. In documenting the project, Fermilab is opening a window into the vast network of people and processes that are needed to undertake building a modern physics research facility. It also helps explain why it’s so expensive, even when there is a lot of free labor provided by students.The basic equipment at both sites is expected to be completed and installed sometime this spring—the electronics will be put in later this summer. © 2014 Phys.org This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

Recreating shades and moods

first_imgAfter presenting a series of inspiring and astonishing artworks at various exhibitions in India and across the world, Indian contemporary artist Swaraj Das is bringing his current series of work to the Capital. Titled, Light and Life, a solo painting exhibition will showcase various shades of life in colours.The abstracts in Das’s paintings, are the images of his life experiences, through melting and overlapping colours to make his paintings more defining and exuberant. His work aims at capturing various colours, phases and moods, from streets narrowed by building-blocks, morning light, monsoon, afternoon, midday and more to do with various aspects of life and nature. In a nut shell, Das has de-constructed images in order to create them anew. His paintings are recreational in nature encompassing experiences manifesting themselves in melting and overlapping colours, water colours, street scapes and figure work.last_img read more

Festive season style tips for kids

first_imgDressing up children for a festive occasion can be a tedious task for many parents. So how about dressing them differently this time? Experts list down some options in festive dressing for children so that you don’t spend time breaking your head over dressing of your children this festive season: Get playful with colours: There is no second thought about guessing the fact that most children love vibrant colours. Let your children be a reminder of the gaiety and fun of the festivals. Dress them up in outfits that are cheerful and vibrant while being tastefully matched. Monochromatic suits and dresses may look classy but stylish outfits that pop out are the best match for little ones. Also Read – Add new books to your shelfComfort is the key: Festivals are about having fun, run about and playful pranks. Children on the occasion of festivals are particularly happier when they see their cousins and families together and lift the spirits of the house with their indulgence. So stick to dressing them up in comfortable festive outfits rather than heavy ornamental ones which limit their movements and cause exhaustion before they even start their play.Let it be formal: Nehru jacket paired with simple shirt-trousers and dresses or gowns for the little ladies may ooze class while still keeping it festive. Also Read – Over 2 hours screen time daily will make your kids impulsiveAccessorise: Festive outfits are no fun without the accessories that go with it. Spend some time to accessorize your child’s outfit and give attention to detail. Girls have numerous combinations of peripherals according to the occasion while boys can jazz it up with suitable traditional headgear, watches and even matching footwear.Do not hesitate: The number one rule for dressing your loved ones is not to hesitate to try out a few things. If budget is not a constraint, be bold enough to look for festive inspirations from designers or a little Do it Yourself (DIY) will do wonders. Tastefully mixing and matching different aspects of fashion may result in a stand-out outfit for your next occasion and makes your kid the star of the show. Let them express themselves: If your child is used to picking their own outfits regularly, let them taste sensible festive fashion by asking them what they feel like wearing in the next festival. If your little one is above 8-9 years of age, it is great if you let your little one choose his or her next outfit, let them make mistakes and teach them a tip or two about dressing while making it a great occasion for bonding over festive fashion.last_img read more