Online Fundraising Campaign in a Box

first_imgIn addition to your ongoing fundraising, advocacy and communication activities, there are times throughout the year when you need to lead your members through a series of actions. Whether it’s communication-list building, hitting a fundraising target to support a new program or structure, or gathering support for a community initiative (to name a few possibilities), you’ll get the most bang for your buck by conducting a targeted fundraising campaign. We’ve put together a step by step guide to the outreach,tracking, follow-up and other activities necessary to reach your goals. Download the free guide: Fundraising Campaign in a Boxlast_img

Reader question: What’s a good framework for a fundraising plan?

first_imgToday, I’m answering another reader question. Beth asks:Can you provide a basic (simple) framework to create a fundraising plan (or resources to do so) – for a brand new nonprofit and their completely new to fundraising staff? Thanks!Here’s what Network for Good recommends in our Fundraising Campaign in a Box. (You can get the whole free kit here. It has worksheets, templates, etc.)1. Figure out what you’re trying to accomplish.Any campaign worth its salt is about getting results. What results are you and your organization looking to achieve? When you’re planning your outreach, remember these three tips:There is no such thing as “the general public”…Instead, you need to segment your communications to be effective and targeted.Some audiences are more important than others. Think about your goals and who holds the key to your success. Lack of participation from primary groups can cause your campaign to falter or fail.2. Determine how you’re going to accomplish your goals (tell a great story).So – you have groups of people and actions you want them to take. How are you going to tell your story in a compelling manner? What themes, messages and ideas are you going to take from your arsenal of content to encourage action? Need inspiration? Read How to Tap into the Heart and Soul of Your Organization When You Write.3. Determine which communications channels you’ll use.There are a variety of online and offline channels that you can use to send the right message to the right audiences. Examples of online channels include your website, search marketing, email marketing and social networking. Offline channels include things like direct mail, paid advertising and public relations.4. Decide which resources you need to get the job done.Ensure that you have all of your tools and resources in place to make your job-and the jobs of your audience(s)-as easy, effective and cost-effective as possible.Is email an important part of your plan, but you’re still communicating with supporters via Outlook? (eek! Stop what you’re doing and read 5 Steps to Choosing the Ideal Email Service Provider)Is your website well-branded and easy to use, with a clear way to donate?Is your website set up to take safe, secure online donations? (I of course recommend Network for Good!)5. Determine who will execute your campaign steps.Accountability will make or break the success of a campaign. As much fun as it is to pass the buck, now is as good a time as any to decide which members of your organization, board or volunteers are responsible for the different portions of your campaign.6. Lay out how you will measure your success.In the case of holiday fundraising, this could be as simple as a dollar sign with a number after it. But take a moment to consider what other goals you may have. Wow your organization’s Board and leadership with conversation rates, list-building, website traffic and any other number results into which they can sink their teeth.7. Set your timeline and benchmarks.One of the defining features of a campaign is that it has a defined start and end. Now that you have planned out the ‘who, what and why’ questions of your campaigns, it’s time to determine the when. Continue to build your campaign plan by setting ownership and deadlines for the associated activities. Begin with the end in mind – if your campaign will run from 11/1 – 12/31, work backwards to be sure that all activities will happen in a smooth manner. Don’t use magical thinking to set deadlines! Run activities in parallel if you are worried about compression time-wise.Good luck!last_img read more

Great neighbors, but no casseroles.

first_imgMy peers and I are the Tweens of adulthood. We are old enough to remember the milkman delivering to the doorstep, and young enough to appreciate the poetry of rap music—at least some of it. We are the children of the baby boom, and the parents of Millennials.Growing up, we were defined by our neighborhoods. Our parents chose neighborhoods based on what today we call affinity groups: ethnicity, education, class, age of kids. Our social network was the neighborhood. Accomplishments were celebrated with neighbors, and challenges were tackled with neighbors, often accompanied by a casserole. Charity began at home.Networked NeighborhoodsBetween the 70s and today, neighborhoods ceased to be the centrifugal center of social networks. Yet the desire for connection remains. We 40- and 50-somethings watch our kids form “neighborhoods” on their Social Networks. Likes, status updates, and feedback have replaced the celebratory visit, but they reinforce the importance of celebration.And importantly, a neighbor in need can draw support from a city of virtual neighborhoods. In the Dragonfly Effect, Jennifer Aaker and Andy Smith tell an illustrative story: Sameer and Vinay, both afflicted with late-stage leukemia, used their networks to register 24,611 South Asian bone marrow donors in 11 weeks. There was an authentic need, clearly communicated, and “neighbors” around the country responded.Networks will increasingly power nonprofits.I recently re-read the Networked Nonprofit, by Beth Kanter and Allison Fine. It brings the networked nonprofit to life in this reflection.Networked Nonprofits don’t work harder or longer than other organizations, they work differently. They engage in conversations with people beyond their walls — lots of conversations — to build relationships that spread their work through the network. Incorporating relationship building as a core responsibility of all staffers fundamentally changes their to-do lists.”Strong networks also support cultivation of major donors and passionate evangelists who provide the backbone for nonprofits as they grow. And through social networks, charities and community organizations can become ’causes’, moving digital citizens to fuel their missions with energy, engagement and – yes – money.Millennials, in particular, say the charities they support are one way they express themselves, and 87% of Millennials in a 2011 survey said “my priority is to look after my family and community; charity begins at home.” And the home that Millennials are most closely tied to is the one they have chosen, in their networked neighborhood.If causes can become authentic institutions of these networked neighborhoods, they will find a new group of supporters who will celebrate their successes and help them tackle their challenges…without the casseroles.Follow Jamie on LinkedIn to get more insights on giving and mobilizing your community.Photo credit: David K., plasticrevolver on Flickrlast_img read more

Discussions at GMHC2013 About Home Births and Traditional Birth Attendants

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 28, 2013March 21, 2017By: Girija Sankar, Director of Haiti Programs, Senior Program Manager, Global Health ActionClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Over 2000 abstracts were submitted to the Global Maternal Health Conference 2013. Eventually, around 800 delegates from all around the world presented papers and posters on maternal health topics under the theme of “Quality of Care”.While all the sessions and plenaries were thought-provoking, some of the sessions that I found especially interesting dealt with home birth attendance and the role of traditional birth attendants (TBAs).Speakers from Nigeria, Pakistan, Burkina Faso, Ethiopia and Uganda all highlighted the role that TBAs continue to play in home deliveries. Just because a country’s Ministry of Health dictates that women should deliver at facilities does not mean that women will indeed deliver at facilities. The reality in many of these countries, quite like Haiti, where I work, is that as long as there are significant barriers to safe, affordable and accessible obstetric care, women will continue to turn to other older women whom they know and trust: traditional birth attendants.Presenters from Bangladesh and Nigeria presented findings from promoting the use of clean delivery kits (CDKs) and the consequent impact on improving safe deliveries. The CDKs were promoted through social marketing to families who would then either take the kit to the facility or give it to the TBA for use in home births.We heard from a practitioner in Ethiopia whose organization works with pastoralists in the remote Afar region to improve health outcomes by training TBAs and encouraging women to visit the maternity waiting rooms built close to the referral centers. The group had identified 6 harmful practices that TBAs practiced, often leading to maternal and neonatal deaths. When trained on safe practices, the TBAs realized that what they had been doing in the past may have led to deaths.In Bangladesh, women, after child birth, are often allowed to bleed for a long time owing to the traditional belief that any blood that leaves the woman’s body after child birth is bad blood. The TBAs have since been trained on why that is dangerous for women.Discussions on task-shifting in HRH must acknowledge the role that TBAs continue to play in communities where women do not seek facility-based care for various reasons. If working with the community and women is important, then so is understanding and respecting decisions that women make in why and how they seek services from traditional birth attendants.Prof. Mahmoud Fathalla perhaps said it best when he said “more women have died from child birth than men have died fighting each other in battles.”Learn more about the conference and access the conference presentations at www.gmhc2013.com. Join the conference conversation on Twitter: #GMHC2013Share this:last_img read more

Code of Conduct for Research in Low-income Countries

first_imgI was fortunate to attend the plenary discussion in Arusha. Richard Horton provided a provocative performance as Chair, and the panelists were excellent in their responses.However, little mention was given to WHO’s WHO’s role and responsibilities in health research: Draft WHO strategy on research for health. That document states, “all the goals concern all Member States and all individuals, communities, institutions and organizations involved in the production and/or use of research, including WHO.”Paragraph 25 discusses the issue of standards:No country is self-sufficient in its research capacity, so Member States need to be able to share research outputs. Effective and equitable sharing requires internationally agreed norms and standards for research; with this in mind, the standards goal concerns the promotion of good practice in research by means of work to establish agreements on good practices, scientific benchmarks, ethical guidelines and accountability mechanisms. The achievement of this goal is essential for winning public support and confidence.The principles from Arusha are sound, and the debate will no doubt continue. But live, Q&A sessions in plenary will not always allow for panelists to critically think through the implications of their intuitive responses. Caution is needed, with consideration of the inadvertent effects that may arise.Several examples in relation to the points proposed:A PhD researcher (from the global north), applying for ethics approval at their host University for their independent, original research is immediately in breach of the first point.  Is it feasible that Harvard, Yale, Oxford, Cambridge, the LSE etc., etc. would change their academic standards of research to insist that all research in LMICs is a joint endeavor – unless you happen to be from the global south?The World Bank/IBRD is a funder of research (often at the country’s expense) but would they shift to this principle on all their publications? Including those that inform their financing decisions with a country? They are after all, a Bank.It is not just “medical” journals that need to heed the call. Aspirations for effective coverage and quality of care for all (i.e. Universal Health Coverage) require many types of health workers. Public health, midwifery, nursing, management, pharmacy and other journals should all be included.More reflection is needed, and perhaps the WHO is best placed to steer a future code. In the meantime, we should all continue to encourage “health” journals to ensure that health information is available for all.For more information on Integrare’s presentations on the High Burden Countries Initiative in Arusha please click here.To learn more about the H4+ High Burden Countries Initiative, click here and follow ICS Integrare on Twitter. Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on February 6, 2013March 21, 2017By: Jim Campbell, Director, Instituto de Cooperacion Social Integrare based in Barcelona, SpainClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The Global Maternal Health Conference in Arusha, Tanzania had many highlights, including the closing plenary presentation from Dr. Mahmoud Fathalla ( watch the presentation here and see Karen Beattie’s blog), and the GMHC2013 manifesto proposed by Richard Horton (see Ann Starrs’ blog for more).A recent article in The Lancet also reports on the plenary discussions on a proposed new Code of Conduct for health research in low-income countries. Lancet Editor Richard Horton  reports:The meeting in Arusha was opened by Agnes Binagwaho, Rwanda’s Minister of Health. She argued passionately that research and ethics must be more closely bound together. She spoke about the theft of data from Africa and the new enslavement of Africans. She called for a Code of Conduct for research in low-income countries.Here is a draft of a Code – a set of principles – assembled from a debate between Agnes Binagwaho, Wendy Graham, Rafael Lozano, and Marleen Temmerman: No ethics committee, funder of research, or medical journal should approve, support, or publish research about a low-income country without joint authorship from that country.In any research project in a low-income setting, local scientists must be included as co-principal investigators.Before starting research in a low-income country, western authors and institutions must define a clear plan for how they will transfer research skills back to that country. Medical journals and their publishers must ensure that all global health research is free at the point of use in countries.Western journals must facilitate language translation of research, either themselves or by enabling local journals to republish freely.last_img read more

New PMNCH Knowledge Summary Highlights Integration of Immunization and Maternal and Child Health

first_imgPosted on April 26, 2013March 13, 2017By: Sarah Blake, MHTF consultantClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The latest in the Partnership for Maternal, Newborn and Child Health Knowledge Summary series highlights the potential for integration of immunization services with other reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health. This summary, “Integrating Immunizations and Other Services for Women and Children,” was prepared by IDEAS. As with the series as a whole, it synthesizes scientific evidence into a brief, user-friendly format so that key findings can inform policy and practice.From the introduction to the “Integrating Immunizations” knowledge summary:The Expanded Program on Immunizations (EPI) has dramatically decreased childhood morbidity and mortality since its introduction in 1974, and now reaches over 85% of the world’s children. Some countries and regions are still working to achieve high coverage, however, and many non-vaccine programs have not gained the same traction needed for maximum impact. Integrating service delivery, for example, health service providers could use the opportunity of immunizing a child to provide nutrition and family planning services for the parents, can provide a program foundation through which broad services can be equitably provided as well as give a beneficial boost to EPI coverage. While integration requires thoughtful and measured planning, the potential impact for families and communities is great.For the full series, including summaries on child marriage, the economic benefits of investments in maternal and child health and midwifery, visit PMNCH’s RMNCH knowledge portal.Share this: ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

New MHTF Topics Page: Post-2015: What’s Next for Maternal Health?

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on January 23, 2014August 10, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is pleased to announce the launch of our latest topic page: “Post-2014: What’s next for maternal health?” Along with our ongoing guest blog series on the proposed maternal health goal for the post-2015 development agenda, the topics page will compile key findings and debates on the position of maternal health in ongoing global and national discussions of health and development goals and challenges. The page includes resources on progress and lessons learned under the MDG framework, as well as on the position of maternal health in the ongoing process for developing the next global development framework. As with all of our topics pages, the post-2015 topics page will serve as a hub, featuring the latest in research, news and debates. To recommend a resource, please contact us.  If you would like to submit a blog post for our ongoing guest blog series on proposed maternal health targets, please email Andrea Goetschius: goetschi@hsph.harvard.eduShare this:last_img read more

3 Reasons Your Grantmaking Strategy May Not Be Working

first_imgPictured Here: Central Alabama Community Foundation – what they’re doing is working.It’s understandable. Programs, not payroll nor paperclips, create excitement and enthusiasm among your board, grant committee, and community when it comes to awarding grants. However, if you are in the philanthropy business, you are in the capacity-building business. We can’t create the type of long-term, lasting change we seek without strong organizations. As grantmakers, we’re dependent on nonprofit leaders that can sustain and scale their impact without applying for more grant dollars.To borrow an example from our for-profit friends, have you ever seen the show “Shark Tank” on ABC?If so, you know that the first questions asked after the entrepreneur’s pitch will be, “What are your sales for the last year?” and “How much do you plan to sell this year?”The sharks dig into the company’s ability to effectively market, sell and scale their product, before digging into its competitive advantages or how it’s manufactured.The sharks know that investing in sales and marketing isn’t a separate strategy. It’s an integral part of their investment strategy. More precisely, it’s the path to their return.I have never met an investor that restricts their funds from sales and marketing. That would be foolish. Investors (funders) depend on a company’s revenue growth, increased profits and sales multipliers to create a return on their investment (impact).In the same way, nonprofit capacity and sustainability are not separate or standalone strategies. They are critical components of all grants and to ensuring our philanthropy creates long-term, lasting impact.Yet, we reverse this order all the time. We ask the nonprofit about its programs, outcomes, and impact, and then maybe (not always) we’ll dive into a sustainability plan.Now, you may be thinking, why don’t we just fund sustainable nonprofits and stop this article here? We can just reject nonprofits that need to build their capacity, right?Well, we wouldn’t have many eligible applicants. According to Network for Good’s 2017 research across 10,000 nonprofits, the overwhelming majority heavily relied on single‐source funding.A startling 78 percent of nonprofits applying for grants have no written or specific fundraising plan to sustain their program, after the grant period (on the other hand, 85 percent view their funders as credible, go-to sources for technical fundraising assistance). Further, according to a new report released by GuideStar, approximately 50 percent of U.S. nonprofits are operating with less than one month’s cash reserves.Therefore, if we want to create long-term change and lasting good, we must stop referring to the capacity building as a standalone strategy. We must view it as part of a comprehensive, holistic strategy – as being implemented by the Central Alabama Community Foundation.[CLICK TO WATCH VIDEO]Nonprofits Must Respond to Emerging Needs, Not Live by ContractsDo you believe the environmental challenges we face today are the same as 50 years ago? Do you believe child development and education is unaffected by the growth in social media?As our communities’ complex challenges evolve, we must ensure that the nonprofits we fund have the resources they need to stay nimble and responsive.Nonprofit leaders operating with razor-thin margins, no process to measure success or retain talent will be caught flat-footed during times of emerging needs or a shifting landscape.So, practically speaking, what can you do?As part of The Walton Family Foundation’s Environment Grant reports, nonprofits are asked, “What notable obstacles did you face during this grant period?” as well as, “What changes to the project were made?”The program staff is interested in knowing how work plans, staffing, and timelines may shift throughout the grant period. This enables them to coach the grantee on navigating unforeseen challenges, re-allocating funds from the original proposal or calling in additional support, instead of using the report to rigidly enforce grant contracts.What would happen if you asked your grantees these questions in your reports?Short-Term Strategies Don’t Fix Long-Term ChallengesDo you believe that racism has been wholly eradicated? Do you feel all Americans have affordable health care? No, of course not. These issues are multifaceted and will, undoubtedly, continue to evolve in the foreseeable future.If we wish to confront longstanding issues plaguing our communities, grant strategies must be designed with the long-term in mind. However, grant funding is inherently short-term in nature (do you know any funders that make 10-year commitments through an annual grant cycle?).Yet, how often do we measure outcomes created 10 years after the grant period ends? Do we know if those dollars are creating the same impact today? Has the program declined?Hopefully not.Shifting to multi-year commitments is not sufficient. We must ensure with greater certainty that our grantees have the capacity to self-fund their programs, long after the grant period.So, practically speaking, what can you do?The YouthBridge Community Foundation is an emergent, three-staff member foundation in St. Louis, Mo. The foundation’s CEO, Michael Howard, regularly educates YouthBridge donors and donor-advised fundholders on how to make gift decisions with the long-term in mind.“You’ve proven your commitment to lasting good and meaningful change,” was the headline phrase from a recent newsletter, educating stakeholders on why the foundation is building the capacity of local nonprofits. This education is enabling YouthBridge to increase their investment in the fundraising capacity of nonprofits serving children and youth in the St. Louis area.Do your board members and donors understand the importance of nonprofit sustainability? How might you educate them in your next communication?Community Needs Outweigh Grantmaking BudgetsWill you be able to fund 100 percent of the letters of inquiry or grant applications you receive this year?Most likely not.This is where we derive the phrase, “competitive grantmaking.” Grantmaking is competitive because needs (generally) always outweigh grant dollars available.Because grantmaking is a zero-sum game (a dollar here can’t be invested there) we need to measure the “impact-per-dollar” of each grant. We must ask ourselves, “Will we create more outcomes if we invest a dollar into this program or that one?”To expand this metric with confidence, grantmakers should pair grant dollars with an investment in an organization’s fundraising capacity. Network for Good has found that, on average, every $1 invested into a nonprofit’s fundraising capacity produces $10 in the program or general operating funding. These are dollars that can be used to amplify and expand the nonprofit’s impact—without tying up additional grant dollars from the funder.So, practically speaking, what can you do?The Tahoe Truckee Community Foundation recently revamped its annual grants process to provide community impact staff with greater depth and insight into the applicant’s strengths and weaknesses.During this process, nonprofits are asked to express any concerns about their ability to financially sustain their programs, and some even take a comprehensive assessment. For a group that identifies fundraising as a core challenge, a micro-grant for fundraising services is bundled into their award, ensuring that the organization not only diversifies revenue but also increases the impact of each grant dollar over time.Have you considered bundling a micro-grant for fundraising capacity alongside a restricted or program grant? Could you pilot this concept with a handful of your grantees?Please comment.  We would like to hear from you.last_img read more

Happy Valentine’s Day: Donor Love Infographic

first_imgLooking for a new way to show your donors some love this Valentine’s Day? Look no further! Let our Donor Love infographic show you the way. We’re here to help you with all your nonprofit fundraising and marketing needs, including:Campaigns & AppealsThank YousResults & ReportsDonor RelationsCommunicationsCheck out our donor love infographic today. Plus, hover over each image for a special surprise!Donor Love InfographicRead more on The Nonprofit Bloglast_img

New Topic Page on Family Planning Now Available

first_imgPhoto: “Fenchuganj Upazila, Sylhet, Bangladesh” © 2011 Shafiqul Alam Kiron/Save the Children, used under a Creative Commons Attribution license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/Share this: Posted on January 26, 2016August 4, 2016Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)The MHTF is proud to bring you a new repository of information on family planning. Our newest topic page, “Integrating Family Planning into Maternal Health,” features an in-depth look at the relationship between family planning and maternal mortality:From 1990 to 2015, the global maternal mortality ratio (MMR) decreased by 44 percent. A drop in the total fertility rate worldwide, due primarily to an increase in contraceptive use, resulted in 1.2 million fewer maternal deaths from 1990 to 2005. However, to reach the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) target of reducing the global MMR to less than 70 per 100,000 live births by 2030, major challenges remain.Use the topic page to learn more about this relationship and to also access the most up-to-date reports, publications, news, and highlights of our work in family planning. ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read:last_img read more

Respectful Maternity Care: A Basic Human Right

first_img ShareEmailPrint To learn more, read: Posted on April 11, 2017May 8, 2017By: Sarah Hodin, Project Coordinator II, Women and Health Initiative, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public HealthClick to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Every woman around the world has a right to receive respectful maternity care. The concept of “respectful maternity care” has evolved and expanded over the past few decades to include diverse perspectives and frameworks. In November 2000, the International Conference on the Humanization of Childbirth was held in Brazil, largely as a response to the trend of medicalized birth, exemplified by the global cesarean section epidemic, as well as growing concerns over obstetric violence. Advocates emphasized the need to humanize birth, taking a woman-centered approach.The concept of “obstetric violence” gained momentum in the global maternal health community during the childbirth activism movement in Latin America in the 1990s. The Network for the Humanization of Labour and Birth (ReHuNa) was founded in Brazil in 1993, followed by the Latin American and Caribbean Network for the Humanization of Childbirth (RELACAHUPAN) during the 2000 conference. In 2007, Venezuela formally defined “obstetric violence” as the appropriation of women’s body and reproductive processes by health personnel, which is expressed by a dehumanizing treatment, an abuse of medicalization and pathologization of natural processes, resulting in a loss of autonomy and ability to decide freely about their bodies and sexuality, negatively impacting their quality of life.Disrespect and abuse (D&A), a concept closely related to obstetric violence, has been documented in many different countries across the globe. In a 2010 landscape analysis, Bowser and Hill described 7 categories of disrespectful and abusive care during childbirth: physical abuse, non-consented clinical care, non-confidential care, non-dignified care, discrimination, abandonment and detention in health facilities. A 2015 systematic review updated this framework to include:Physical abuseSexual abuseVerbal abuseStigma and discriminationFailure to meet professional standards of carePoor rapport between women and providersHealth system conditions and constraintsSome evidence suggests that ethnic minorities are at greater risk of experiencing D&A during facility-based childbirth. Other factors that might influence a woman’s risk include parity, age and marital status. Women who have experienced or expect mistreatment from health workers may be less likely to deliver in a facility and to seek care in the future.Respectful maternity care (RMC) is not only a crucial component of quality of care; it is a human right. In 2014, WHO released a statement calling for the prevention and elimination of disrespect and abuse during childbirth, stating that “every woman has the right to the highest attainable standard of health, including the right to dignified, respectful care during pregnancy and childbirth.” WHO also called for the mobilization of governments, programmers, researchers, advocates and communities to support RMC. In 2016, WHO published new guidelines for improving quality of care for mothers and newborns in health facilities, which included an increased focus on respect and preservation of dignity.While a number of interventions have aimed to address this issue, many women around the world, including those living in high-income countries, continue to experience aspects of disrespectful and abusive care during childbirth. As facility-based birth and the use of skilled birth attendants continue to rise, a focus on quality and RMC remains critical for improving global maternal health.Access resources related to respectful maternity care >>Share this:last_img read more

Province launches catchup immunization program to protect against measles

first_img“With this catch-up campaign, we can really work to reach herd immunity where at least 95% of the population is vaccinated. It will also help better prepare parents to be aware of vaccination status, for when we introduce the next step of mandatory reporting of school-age children’s vaccination status this fall.”Without a record of immunization (or proof of immunity to a disease), a person is considered unimmunized and unprotected and should generally be immunized or re-immunized to ensure protection. It is safe to repeat immunizations.Parents should check their children’s immunization records to be sure they are up-to-date. If they are unsure or do not have the records handy, they can check with their primary care provider or public-health unit. Parents can provide their child’s records to their local public-health unit for entry into the provincial immunization registry. If a child’s current immunization record is already on file with the local health unit, parents do not need to provide it again.Health authorities will be working with schools to notify parents of upcoming measles immunization catch-up clinics, information about measles and what to expect if your child needs a measles immunization. Health authorities will contact families with under or unimmunized children through a variety of actions, including direct-calling families, sending emails and letters, and working with schools on newsletters. “With outbreaks of measles occurring globally and here in B.C., we know we will see threats of further outbreaks and can be doing more to raise immunization rates,” said Adrian Dix, Minister of Health. “That is why we are launching a catch-up program to immunize children from kindergarten to Grade 12 who have not previously been immunized against measles and to provide a dose for those who may not have received both doses.“Our goal is to immunize as many people as possible before the end of the school year. The purpose, ultimately, is to reach an immunization rate of 95% as recommended.”“Safeguarding the health and well-being of children, staff and teachers who come into our classrooms and their family members at home is one of our highest priorities,” said Rob Fleming, Minister of Education. “The K-12 education system plays a critical role in raising awareness of the importance of childhood vaccines and increasing immunization rates. We are continuing to work across government, and with our education and health community partners, to help curb preventable outbreaks and increase student safety.”For this catch-up campaign, the Province is initially purchasing $3 million in the vaccine – the equivalent of a one year supply of vaccine.The catch-up program is the first step in the government’s two-phase plan to educate people about the importance of immunization and help them become aware of their immunization status. Offering the measles immunization catch-up program now will also help prepare parents for the mandatory reporting of vaccination status, which is planned for the fall of 2019.“Very few people in B.C. are against all vaccinations,” said Dr. Brian Emerson, deputy provincial health officer. “Due to a variety of other factors, measles immunization rates in B.C. are lower than they should be to ensure herd immunity. VICTORIA, B.C. – The Province shares they are launching a measles immunization catch-up program to help B.C. families ensure their children are protected from measles.The program will run from April through June 2019 will be delivered by Health authorities. According to the Government, the program will be made available in schools to children (from kindergarten to Grade 12), public health units, community health centres and mobile community clinics in select regions.The program will be delivered similarly with some regional variations. By offering it in schools, public-health units and community health centres, the catch-up program is designed to make it simpler and stress-free for parents to ensure their children are adequately protected from measles. Pharmacists will also be part of the efforts to increase immunization rates shared by the Government.last_img read more

Five takeaways from Bowling Green Samuel shines defense stands tall

The Ohio State football team prepares to run onto the field prior to the first game of the 2016 season against Bowling Green on Sept. 3 at Ohio Stadium. The Buckeyes won 77-10. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAfter a 77-10 rout of the Bowling Green Falcons on Saturday, the Ohio State football team appears to be ready for the challenges ahead in 2016. Here are five takeaways from the game.Samuel the workhorse for OSUEarlier in the spring, Ohio State coach Urban Meyer named junior H-back Curtis Samuel as his No. 1 playmaker. Known for his speed and agility, Buckeye fans got a glimpse Saturday as to why Meyer had faith in Samuel. Touching the ball 22 times, the junior picked up 261 all-purpose yards and three total touchdowns. Although the day was a chance to see how redshirt sophomore Noah Brown and redshirt senior Corey Smith would perform at wide receiver after season-ending injuries last season, Samuel was the leading pass catcher on Saturday.Redshirt freshman Mike Weber was the leading rusher on the day, receiving 19 carries. Samuel was the second leading rusher on the day, handling the ball on the ground 13 times. Weber will be facing stiff competition with Samuel playing at such a high level.“It’s a great feeling to be one of the first people out there to touch the ball. I have to keep my mind right,” Samuel said. “I just want to ball out and make opportunities for my team.”One thing is certain after OSU faced Bowling Green; Samuel really is a playmaker. The Silver Bullets are fast and have depthRedshirt junior defensive tackle Tracy Sprinkle sustained what appeared to be a serious right knee injury in the first quarter. OSU fans’ worst fears were confirmed by Meyer at the press conference following the game, as it was announced that the early indication is a patellar tendon injury, most likely requiring surgery. “Tracy’s been my roommate since we first got here. Me and Tracy, we were real close during recruiting,” junior defensive end Tyquan Lewis said. “I love Tracy to death. That’s my brother. When he went down, it was the worst thing. He’s family to me.”Although the loss of Sprinkle might hurt in the long run, the Buckeyes regrouped quickly and had little drop off without their primary defensive tackle on the field. Much of the reason for the success can be credited to the depth Meyer and the rest of the OSU coaching staff has talked about all spring.As for the speed of the defense, the ability of Buckeye defenders to chase down ball carriers and undercut routes to prevent receptions was showcased throughout all four characters. On two occasions, redshirt sophomore safety Malik Hooker used his speed to track down the ball and come up with an interception.“Greg Schiano, who has coached at the highest level in football in the pros, and his comments to me about the things Malik can do,” Meyer said. “He can do whatever he trains to do.”Holes filled up quickly by linebackers and secondary defenders, preventing long carries by Bowling Green. Although a few players showcased potential weakness in coverage and pass rushing, the speed of OSU’s defense quickly made up for the miscues. The Buckeyes’ coaching staff definitely were right in saying this team is faster than last year’s. The secondary can depend on more than Gareon ConleyAlthough the only returning starter for the OSU secondary was redshirt junior Gareon Conley, the Buckeyes looked sharp throughout the afternoon. Bowling Green struggled to create any offense through the air, and Hooker came up with two big interceptions. True freshman cornerback Rodjay Burns took full advantage of his time on the field, picking off Bowling Green backup quarterback James Morgan and returning the ball 75 yards for a touchdown. The Buckeyes surrendered just 175 yards through the air.“We have a lot of talent,” junior cornerback Damon Webb said. “We’re just trying to get guys as much experience as we can and get guys on the field because we have a lot of talent, and we want to show it.”The longest pass the Falcons could muster all day was 17 yards, a testament to the swarming secondary play OSU enjoyed. They may not have the likes of Eli Apple, Tyvis Powell or Vonn Bell. But the Scarlet and Gray may just have a dominant group of cornerbacks and safeties for 2016. J.T. Barrett has maturedWhen redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett first appeared for the Buckeyes in 2014 to replace the injured Braxton Miller, Barrett helped lead the team to the College Football Playoff. Although the offense succeeded under the then-freshman, the workload of former running back Ezekiel Elliott was thought to have carried the team through most of the season. Barrett was considered immature as a player and needed time to develop. The game against Bowling Green Saturday is a testament to just how far he has come as a player. Misreading a route early in the first quarter, Barrett gave up a pick-six to Falcons linebacker Brandon Harris.“Throwing an interception for a touchdown we don’t like that,” Meyer said. “But rebound, let’s go, and he went right back and said that’s on me.”Barrett went on to complete 21 passes on 31 attempts and toss six touchdowns on 349 yards, adding another score on the ground. The seven touchdowns he was responsible for set a new record for OSU. All of this was accomplished with more than six minutes left in the third quarter.After finishing fifth in Heisman voting in 2014, Barrett makes for a compelling player who just may find himself on voters ballots this year if he can continue with this kind of production. Mike Weber has the potential to succeed at OSUAfter the recruiting saga that went with Weber, the debut of the Detroit native was delayed after a meniscus tear in his knee resulted in a redshirt season in his freshman campaign. In the spring of 2016, Weber had many expectations to meet from his coaches, and that’s exactly what he did.OSU running backs coach Tony Alford called Weber’s parents on Wednesday to share the news that their son was going to be the starting running back for the Scarlet and Gray.In his first game as a Buckeye, Weber rushed for 136 yards on 19 carries. Although he failed to score, Weber showcased a punishing running style, especially on his first carry. After being tripped a few yards from the line of scrimmage, Weber barreled into the defender in front of him, flattening the would-be tackler. The crowd erupted in cheers.Meyer spoke highly of his tailback, but extended the challenge to Weber of running a bit more like departed Ezekiel Elliott. Lofty standards for a guy appearing in his first game, but a good showing for the redshirt freshman nonetheless. read more

Chris May sparks Ohio State mens lacrosse from the faceoff X

Senior midfielder Chris May (left) is widely considered the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.Credit: Molly Tavoletti / Lantern reporterWhile snow continues to fall as March begins on Ohio State’s campus, in the lacrosse world, all signs point to May.Chris May, that is, who is now the No. 1 faceoff specialist in the country as a member of the OSU men’s lacrosse team.The Buckeyes fell just short of a win against Marquette on Sunday, losing 10-9, and while the team went 1-1 on the weekend in Louisville, Ky., May went 32 of 39 on the weekend in faceoffs, earning the Big Ten Specialist of the Week for the third time this season. And though he is more successful than ever, the graduate transfer has a “pretty crazy story” about his journey from Georgetown University to his first season with OSU.“My senior year, I was only in pads for a few practices,” he said. “I was coming off a shoulder injury when I tore my Achilles tendon … Once I got hurt, I started focusing on my future and graduate school. I’ve been a Buckeye fan my whole life … I realized I only had one shot to do this, so I really worked hard.”At Georgetown, he only stepped onto the field for 22 games, but now after just six with the Buckeyes, May has won 75 percent of his faceoffs and snagged 60 ground balls, thriving in a position named aptly for the precise skill set it requires.“It’s a unique position,” OSU assistant coach Jamison Koesterer said. “It’s mental, just hearing the whistle, finding a rhythm between what he hears and what he needs to execute physically … It definitely takes athleticism, but it also takes savvy, a little bit of poise and IQ to understand and anticipate where the ball might come out.”May’s success at the midfield X results not only from a consistent process, but also an unwavering support from his team, enabling him to aid the offense in taking the ball to the net.“A lot goes into it, but I just try to get a good reaction off the whistle and fight for the ball,” May said. “We’ve got a lot of great offensive players. A lot of guys who can score, but they can’t score if they don’t have the ball … But it’s a group effort, we have a great unit. It’s a great dynamic.”Although May is the new kid on the block with the Buckeyes, former high school teammate and OSU senior captain David Planning said he enjoys feeding off May’s familiar energy.“He’s such an easy guy to play with,” Planning said. “He knows what his job is. It makes it a lot easier on the offense and the defense.”With a lacrosse resume stronger than most of his younger OSU teammates, May assimilated quickly. He assumed a leadership role, but admitted his teammates teach him a few things too.“Being older than a lot of the guys, I feel like I have more experience,” May said. “I’m trying to be a role model for the younger guys, but I’m still learning a lot from the older guys too.”And while May continues to fine-tune his craft at the X, the rest of the Buckeyes look to learn from the loss at Marquette, revisiting the drawing board but “hungry” to return to the field.“We’re getting back to the basics on both sides of the ball,” coach Nick Myers said. “There’s always a desire coming off a loss wanting to look at what went wrong and how to fix it. Tuesday, we practiced in the pouring rain for two hours and these guys didn’t blink an eye … It’s a long wait till Saturday whenever you lose, so they’re excited.”The Buckeyes stand at the threshold of an uphill climb, facing three top 20 opponents before heading into conference play, but Planning said the team isn’t focusing on the opposition.“Our focus is on us,” Planning said. “We want to dictate the tempo and the style of play, and that starts with us.”With that goal in mind, Planning, May and the rest of the Buckeyes are set to move to Ohio Stadium on March 7 to take on Hofstra at 1 p.m. read more

Wes Morgan declared fit for Newport game

first_imgLeicester City manager Claude Puel has confirmed that defender Wes Morgan has recovered from illness in time to face Newport County in the third round of the FA Cup.Morgan was sidelined for Leicester’s last two games against Cardiff City and Everton, but Puel has confirmed he’s now available for selection when they visit Newport County on Saturday.“Wes came back in training this week with good fitness and he’s available for the game,” the Frenchman told the national media on Friday afternoon,” Puel told the club’s website.“We will see. I don’t want to give all the players who are available for this game! It will be a good team, 18 strong players, with some rotation.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“The players have played a lot [over the festive period] and it’s important to maintain freshness in the team.“We have a squad with players who are close and we need to use all the possibilities of the squad to maintain a good freshness and to compete at a high level in our games.“It’s important to find a good balance between quality, freshness and to maintain this level.”last_img read more

RBC will refinance TCI UK Bail Out loan

first_img RBC Team off to Grand Turk with EZ Pay Related Items:royal bank of canada, uk tci bail out Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppProvidenciales, 06 Jan 2015 – Royal Bank of Canada, RBC is the bank the Government will go with to refinance that UK-backed bail-out loan of 2009. The Loan Refinancing Ordinance passed on December 17th and took effect the next day. The new law lays out the who, the how, the how much and the how long among other things of the bridge loan refinancing which will do away with the UK guaranteed loan of $170 million dollars. It is outlined in the ordinance that the loan with RBC cannot exceed $28 million dollars, must be repaid at the end of three and a half years, at a rate initially of 1.2% and that it will be repaid in fourteen equal installments of two million dollars every ninety days. It is explained that in order to keep that borrowing rate, the Turks and Caicos will have to maintain a BBB+ rating for at least the duration of the loan; if we lose ground there, it will cause a hike in the borrowing rate. This also means that if the TCI secures a better credit rating, then the rate of the loan will decrease. Included in that ordinance is that the TCI can repay the RBC Loan early without penalty and that the first payment would be due ninety days after disbursement of the money. Recommended for you Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Roll Out of EZ Pay in TCI today 16 Graduate from Save The Bays International YEA Leadership Training Programlast_img read more

Two Arrested In Connection With Burglary At Kenai Central High School

first_imgLangham: “The total value of the stolen property by Brower and Gordon was greater than $750 and less than $25,000.” Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享The Kenai Police Department have arrested two individuals in connection with a break in and burglary at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop that occured on December 20. As part of the ongoing investigation into the burglary, Byron G. Gordon, age 40, of Kenai was arrested for Burglary 2nd Degree and Theft 2nd Degree. Also arrested was Kevin W. Brower, age 51, of Kenai. KPD Luitenent Ben Langham: “Byron Gordon entered and remained at the Kenai Central High School wood and metal shop interior building fenced in area and property while commiting the crime of theft in the 2nd degree. Kevin Brower arrived shortly after shortly after in his vehicle and collected Byron Gordon along with a stolen welder, power tools, and other stolen property.” Brower was arrested on January 22 in connection with a burglary at the Kenai Wash and Dry according to Langham he was released and then a warrant was served for his and Gordons arrest in connection with the burglary at Kenai Central High School. Brower told investigators that he returned days later on his own, and took another welder from the school. According to Langham, Brower was found in possession of the second stolen welder during a consent search by KPD. Story as aired: Audio PlayerJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp3VmJennifer-on-two-arrested-for-KCH-break-in.mp300:00RPdlast_img read more

2019 Lexus LC Inspiration heads to Chicago looking like a Coldplay song

first_img See All Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate can open like French doors Share your voice • Chicago Auto Show 2019 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value 2019 Lexus LC Inspiration is all about that yellow Tags Coupes Luxury cars Feb 8 • 2019 Chicago Auto Show recap: Big debuts from Mazda, Toyota, Subaru and more Feb 9 • 2019 Ram 2500 HD gets accessorized with Mopar goodies reading • 2019 Lexus LC Inspiration heads to Chicago looking like a Coldplay songcenter_img Post a comment 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better 0 28 Photos Enlarge ImageAnd it was all yellow. Andrew Krok/Roadshow Lexus first introduced its Inspiration Series cars with a Black Panther tie-in, and it followed that with a big, fancy SUV at the LA Auto Show. Now, for the Chicago Auto Show, it has something sportier in the works.Lexus on Wednesday introduced the 2019 LC 500 Inspiration Series, which will make its official debut at the 2019 Chicago Auto Show next week. Like previous Inspiration Series vehicles, the LC 500 version is all about beefing up the style — but this one sports just a bit more flair than the others.The LC 500 Inspiration Series rocks a very bright shade of yellow paint with a metallic finish. 21-inch wheels, a carbon fiber roof and a carbon fiber lower grille insert complement the Flare Yellow paint job. Inside, there are yellow door inserts made from Alcantara suede, and the leather seats sport yellow stitching that extends to the instrument panel, glove box and center console. There’s also a set of carbon fiber door sill inserts.But that’s not all. The 100 buyers lucky enough to scoop this car up will also receive a leather garment bag that can fold into a travel bag. Flare Yellow lining matches the car’s paint, and there’s double yellow stitching on the top hem. Everything else about the car is the same as usual, though. Under the hood is a 5.0-liter naturally aspirated V8 putting out 471 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque, all of which is sent to the rear wheels through a 10-speed automatic transmission. When it goes on sale in April, the 2019 Lexus LC 500 Inspiration Series will set you back a cool $106,210, about $14,000 more than a base model. Review • 2018 Lexus LC 500: Flagship coupe packs stunning style and performance More about 2018 Lexus LC Feb 8 • Ram’s Multifunction Tailgate adds a 60-40 split Chicago Auto Show 2019 Lexus More From Roadshow Lexuslast_img read more

BNP resumes nomination letters distribution

first_imgLogo of BNPBNP resumed the distribution of its nomination letters among its selected candidates on the second day today (Tuesday) for contesting the upcoming national election, reports UNB.The distribution for the second day started at the party chairperson’s Gulshan office around 12:45pm with handing over a party ticket to Shahria Islam Shaila for Faridpur-4 seat.Later, Mohammad Shahidul Islam and Emaran Saleh Prince received the party’s nomination letters for Faridpur-2 and Mymensingh-1 constituencies respectively.Like the previous day, a large number of supporters of party nomination hopefuls started gathering in front of the BNP chairperson’s office since 10am.On Monday, BNP secretary general Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir started the process by handing over the nomination letters of its chairperson Khaleda Zia to Bogura BNP president Saiful Islam for Bagura-6 and to her adviser Helaluzzaman Lalu for Bogura-7 at 3:15pm.Fakhrul said they have nominated two candidates in most seats while single ones only in the constituencies of party senior leaders.He said they keep additional runners to replace in case of any candidate’s nomination is annulled during scrutiny.The party, however, still did not disclose how many candidates received nomination letters on Monday.Two popular singers — Rumana Islam Kanak Chapa and Baby Naznin – received BNP’s nomination letters on Monday to contest the election from Sirajganj-1 and Nilphamari-4 seats respectively.Besides, Awami League’s ex-MP Golam Maula Rony joined BNP and collected the its nomination letter on Monday evening.The BNP leaders who got party tickets from Dhaka division include Aman Ullah Aman (Dhaka-2), Gayeshwar Chandra Roy (Dhaka-3), Salahuddin Ahmed (Dhaka-4) Nabiullah Nabi (Dhaka-5), Abul Basahr ((Dhaka-6), Mirza Abbas (Dhaka-8), Habib-un-Nabi Sohel (Dhaka-9) and Abdus Salam (Dhaka-13), Khairul Kabir Khokan (Narsingd-1), Sanaullah Miiah (Narsingd-3, Fakir Mahubub Anam Swapan and Sarker Shaheed (Tangail-1), Sultan Saluddin Tuku and his elder brother Shamsul Alam Tofa (Tangail-2), Mainul Islam and Lutfur Rahman Khan Azad (Tangail-3), Lutfur Rahman Matin and Abdul Halim (Tangail-4), Maj Gen (retd) Mahmudul Hasan and Saidul Haque (Tangail-5), Gautam Chakraborty and Nurmohammad Khan (Tangail-6) and Abdul Kalam Azad and Saidul Islam Khan (Tangail-7), Those who got nomination letters from Khulna division are Joyanta Kumar Kunda and Asaduzzaman (Jhenaidah-1), Abdul Mazid and M Moshiur Rahman (Jhenaidah-2), singer Monir Khan and Mehdi Hasan Rony (Jhenaidah-3), Saiful Islam Firoz and Shahiduzzaman Beltu (Jhenaidah-4), Masud Arun (Meherpur-1) and Jabed Masud Milton and Amjad Hossain (Meherpur-2).Missing BNP leader M Ilias Ali’s wife Tahsina Rushdir Luna (Sylhet-2) also collected the party’s nomination letter.Those BNP leaders received nomination letters under Barishal division are Jahir Uddin Swapan and Abdus Sobhan (Barishal-1),Syed Moazzem Hossain Alal, Sharfuddin Ahmed Santu and Shahidul Haque Jamal (Barishal-2), Advocate Zainul Abedin and Selima Rahman (Barishal-3), Mejbah Uddin Farhad and Rajib Ahsan (Barishal-4), Mujibur Rahman Sarwar and Ebadul Haque Chand (Barishal-5), Abul Hossain Khan and Prof Abdur Rashid Khan (Barishal-6),Shahjahan Omar and Rafiqul Islam Jamal (Jhalakati-1),Ishrat Jahan Elen Bhutto and Jeba Rahman (Jhalakati-2), Ruhul Amin Dulal and Shahjahan Mia (Pirojpur-3), Matiur Rahman Talukdar and Nazrul Islam Mollah (Barguna-1),Nurul Islam Moni (Barguna-2), Altaf Hossain Chowdhury and Suraiya Akhter Chowdhury (Patuakhali-1), Shahidul Alam Chowdhury and Salma Alam (Patuakhali-2), Golam Maula Rony, Hasan Mamun and Md Shahjahan (Patuakhali-3), ABM Mosharaf Hossain and Moniruzzaman (Patuakhali-4), Hafiz Ibrahim and Rafiqul Islam (Bhola-2), Hafiz Uddin Ahmed and Kamal Hossain (Bhola-3) and Nazimuddin Alam and Nurul Islam Nayan (Bhola- 4).BNP announced no candidate for the Bhola-1 constituency as the party will share it with Bangladesh Jatiya Party (BJP) Party chairman Andaleeve Rahman Partho.The nomination hopefuls under Rangpur division include Naushad Zamir and Towhidul Islam (Panchagarch-1), Barrister Tasmia Prodhan and Farhad Hossain Azad (Panchagrach-2), Mirza Fakhrul Islam Alamgir (Thakurgaon-1), M Abdus Salam and Julfikar Mortuza Chowdhury, (Thakurgaon-2), Jahedul Islam Jahid and Ziaul Islam Zia (Thakurgaon-3), Manjurul Islam and Mamunur Rashid Chowdhury (Dinagpur-1), Sadik Reaz and Bazlur Rashid (Dinagpur-2), Syed Jahangir Alam and Dr Mazharul Islam Dolan (Dinagpur-3), Hafizur Rahman Sarker and Akhtaruzzaman Miah ((Dinagpur-4), Rjwanul Haque and Jakaria Bachchu (Dinagpur-5), Lutfur Rahman and Sohidul Islam Shahin (Dinagpur-6.), Khandaker Ziaul Islam and Mozharul Islam (Gaibandha-1), Mhmudunabi Tutul and Ahad Ahmed (Gaibandha-2), Dr Moinul Hasan Sadik (Gaibandha-3), Obaidul Haque and Faruk Alam (Gaibandha-4), Hasan Ali and Faruk Kabir (Gaibandha-5), Mosharraf Hossain Sujan (Rangpur-1), Wahiduzzaman Mamun and Mozaffar Ali (Rangpur -2), Rita Rahman (PPB) and Mozaffar Ahmad (Rangpur-3), Emdadul Haque Bharsa (Rangpur-4), Solaiman Alam and Dr Momtaz (Rangpur-5), Saiful Islam (Rangpur-6).Rafiqul Islam, Nancy Rahman Kabir (Nilphamari-1), Shamsuzzaman Jamal and Kazi Akhtaruzzam (Kabir (Nilphamari-2), Fahmida Foysal (Kabir (Nilphamari-3), Salahuddin Helal (Lalmonirhat 2) abd Asadul Habib Dulu (Lalmonirhat 3), Abul Hasnat Kaikobad (Kurigram -1), Abu Bakar Siddique (Kurigram-2), Tajvirul Islam and Abdul Khaleque (Kurigram-3), Azizur Rahman and Mokhlesur Rahman (Kurigram-4) are among the aspirants.Those who got BNP tickets from Rajshahi division are Faisal Amin and Fazlur Rahman (Joypurhat-1), Golam Mostafa and Abu Yusuf Khalilur Rahman ((Joypurhat-2), Kazi Rafiqul Islam and Mohammad Shokrana (Bagura-1), Abdul Muhith Talukder and Masuda Momen (Bagura-3), Golam Mohammad Siraj and Jane-e-Alam (Bagura-5), Kamrun Nahar Shirin and Taiful Islam Tipu (Natore-1), Sabina Yasmin and Ruhul Kuddus Talukder Dulu (Natore-2), Daud Mahmud and Anwar Hossain Anu (Natore-3), and Abdul Aziz(Natore-4), Md Shahjahan Miah and Belal Baki (Chapainawabganj-1), Anwarul Islam (Chapainawabganj-2), Abdul Wahed and Harunur Rashid (Chapainawabganj-3), Salek Chowdhury, Mustafizur Rahman and Masud Rana (Naogaon-1), Shamsuzzaman Khan, Khaja Nazibullah Chowdhury (Naogaon-2), Rabiul Alam Bullet and Parvez Arefin Siddique Jony (Naogaon -3), Shamsul Alam Pramanik and Ekramul Bari Tito (Naogaon -4), Zahidul Islam and Nazmul Haque Soni (Naogaon-5), Alamgir Kabir and Sheikh Rezaul Islam (Naogaon-6) Aminul Haque (Rajshahi-1), Mizanur Rahman Minu and Sayed Hasan (Rajshahi-2), Matiur Rahman Montu and Shafiqul Haque Milon (Rajshahi-3), Abu Hena and Md Abdul Gafur (Rajshahi-4), Nadim Mustafa and Nazrul Mondol (Rajshahi-5), Abu Sayeed Chan and Nuruzzaman Khan Manik (Rajshahi-6) and Asadul Habib Dulu (Lalmonirhat-3).Kanak Chapa and Nazmul Hasan Rana (Sirajganj-1), Romana Mahmud and Iqbal Hasan Mahmud Tuku from (Sirajganj-2) Ainul Haque and Abdul Mannan Talukder (Sirajganj-3), Amirul Islam Alim and Rakibul Karim Khan Pappu (Sirajganj-5), Kamruddin Yahia Khan Majlish and Dr AM a Muhith (Sirajganj-6), AKM Selim Reza Habib and Hasan Jafir Tuhin (Pabna-2), AKM Anwarul Islam and Fakhrul Azam (Pabna-3), Habibur Rahman Habib and Sirajul Islam Khan (Pabna-4) and Shamsur Rahman Shimul Biswas (Pabna-5), are also among the BNP leaders who got party nomination letters under Rajshahi division.BNP leaders who received nomination letters under Chattogram division include Barrister Mahbubuddin Khokon and Mamunur Rashid (Noakhali-1), Zainul Abedin Farroque and Kazi Mofizur Rahman (Noakhali-2), Barkatullah Bulu and Mazharul Islam Dolan (Noakhali-3), Mohammad Shahjahan (Noakhali-4), Moudud Ahmed (Noakhali-5) and Fazlul Azim (Noakhali-6), Abul Khaier Bhiyan (Laxmipur-2), Shahiduddin Chowdhury Anee (Laxmipur-3), and Ashrafuddin Nizan (Laxmipur-4), Abdul Awal Mintoo (Feni-3) and VP Zainal (Feni-3), and Dipen Dewan and Moni Swapan (Rangamati).END/UNB/ARJ/SAMlast_img read more