“They just sedate them”: Coronavirus overwhelms Spain’s care homes

first_imgAs Spain struggles desperately to cope with more than 130,000 coronavirus infections, it barely has the strength to help its overwhelmed care homes and their elderly residents, singularly vulnerable to the respiratory disease.With hospitals stretched to breaking point, the elderly are being turned away, and the care homes, lacking staff and appropriate equipment, must do what they can for the sick and dying.”When they are very sick – not only here, in more than one place – … when they see there is no solution … they sedate them and see how long they last, because they’re leaving intensive care wards for younger people,” said Maria Jose Alvarez, whose 85-year-old mother is in a home near Barcelona. “It’s sad, it’s really sad. They don’t deserve this.”The home did not respond to requests for comment, but the local government in the area said half the home’s residents were in isolation. In addition, two-thirds of its workers had been sent home because of the virus, a picture that the UGT union says has been repeated across Spain.After Italy, Spain has the world’s second highest death toll, with over 12,000 fatalities as of Monday.Of a total of 3,000 deaths recorded at Madrid nursing homes in the past month, regional leader Isabel Diaz Ayuso said around 2,000 were likely to have been the result of coronavirus, though it was unclear how many of those appear in official figures due to a lack of testing. At one care home in the Madrid suburb of Leganes, 46 people have died since March 15.Like seven other private care homes in the area, it has been taken over by regional authorities.”Faced with an infection of this scale, we simply aren’t prepared,” said Antonio Morales, operations director with the owner, Vitalia Homes.He said at least 150 of the residents were likely to be infected – but that some hospitals had stopped admitting patients from care homes, forcing the residences to cope as best they could.A lack of testing kits was preventing staff confirming whether or not the patients had contracted the disease.And the few staff who are not ill or scared and still coming to work often have to contend with a lack of protective equipment such as masks and gloves, though supplies are beginning to filter through.”We’re a care home, not a hospital,” Morales said.Union leaders say many homes are failing to adhere to basic protocols such as separating healthy residents from those who have tested positive or have symptoms.Army units deployed to disinfect care homes across Spain have discovered unattended bodies, as staff lacked the resources to dispose of them properly.Official data released on Friday showed that care home residents accounted for around 40% of coronavirus deaths in the region of Castilla y Leon, and a quarter in neighboring Castilla La Mancha.In the northeasterly Catalonia region, authorities said on Thursday that 31% of care homes had residents with coronavirus symptoms, and that they had reported 511 deaths.center_img Topics :last_img read more

Pandemic no match for Indonesia’s door-to-door teachers

first_img“No one’s forcing me to do this — it’s something inside telling me to do it,” the 57-year-old told AFP.”I feel a bit guilty about breaking [orders] to hold online classes, but the reality is that it isn’t easy here.”The only solution is to be close to students with door-to-door teaching,” he added.Suroto is one of a small number of teachers taking on dangerous terrain, bad weather and the chance of contracting the novel coronavirus, to reach home-bound students across the world’s fourth-most populous nation, home to a quarter of billion people. Topics : Nearly 70 million children and young people have been affected by school shutdowns which started in mid-March.While the pandemic has sparked a boom in online learning, especially in wealthy nations, about one-third of Indonesia’s nearly 270 million people don’t have access to the Internet or even, in some cases, electricity. Call to teachAs Indonesian authorities consider reopening schools, critics warn it is too early as the nation’s virus curve has yet to flatten.Officially, the country has more than 35,000 cases of COVID-19 and 2,000 deaths. But with one of the world’s lowest testing rates, Indonesia’s real toll is widely believed to be much higher.And the country’s pediatric association has warned that malnutrition and mosquito-borne dengue fever may be putting children at a greater risk of dying from the respiratory illness. Nearly 18 percent of Indonesian children under five years old suffer from nutritional deficiencies, while kids aged five to 14 make up nearly 42 percent of dengue fever patients, according to health ministry data. The risk was highlighted in April when an 11-year-old girl with dengue fever, which itself can be fatal, died after contracting COVID-19. Health authorities said the pre-existing illness could have exacerbated the effect of the virus on her weakened immune system.Still, getting back to school can’t come fast enough for some students.”I’m bored at home. I miss the school and all my friends and teachers,” said Gratia Ratna Febriani, a pupil in Kenalan village.That feeling struck a chord with junior high school teacher Yunedi Sepdiana Sine who says she will keep answering the call to visit some 50 children a week.”Students really miss their teachers so I feel needed,” she said.”And that’s what makes me content.” ‘Can’t help them’ Meanwhile, many rural parents struggle to fill the gap as they juggle often low-paid jobs and child care.”I can only remind [the kids] to study because I can’t help them like a teacher can,” said Orlin Giri, a mother from East Nusa Tenggara, one of Indonesia’s poorest regions.”And we don’t have enough money for an Internet plan,” she added.That is a common story nationwide, said Fina, a teacher on Borneo island.”Many parents only graduated from elementary school or junior high school — or they didn’t even go to school,” she said.”Just being able to send their children to school is an extraordinary achievement.”Fina, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, opted not to visit students as she has a baby and lives in an area with a high infection rate.”But this pandemic has taught us that, while technology is good and very helpful, it so far cannot replace the presence of teachers,” she said. ‘Feet on the street’Suroto and other Indonesian teachers say they wear face masks, but the threats of becoming sick or infecting students are ever-present.Avan Fathurrahman, an elementary school instructor on East Java’s Madura island, visits up to 11 students a day, an experience he wrote about in now-viral Facebook posts.He admits to being scared of getting ill.”But my fears were overcome by the call to teach,” Fathurrahman said.”I would not be comfortable staying at home knowing that my students couldn’t study properly.”Aside from government calls for online learning, educational programs are being aired on a state-owned TV channel.Education minister Nadiem Makarim — a co-founder of local ride-hailing app GoJek — has acknowledged the challenges in remote learning, however, and even expressed shock at how many rural Indonesians lacked Internet service.”We have to rely on the feet on the street — the actual teachers that mobilize themselves to teach door to door,” he said last month.The pandemic has underscored huge challenges in updating creaky infrastructure across the nearly 5,000 kilometer Southeast Asian archipelago — a key priority for president Joko Widodo.”Infrastructure-wise, Indonesia is not fully ready for online learning,” said Christina Kristiyani, an education expert at Sanata Dharma University. “Even if it was possible to do real-time video conferencing, it costs too much in rural areas,” she added. Teacher Henrikus Suroto vowed his students wouldn’t be cheated out of their education when the global pandemic forced schools to be closed in Indonesia’s remote Kenalan village.So he braves windy mountain roads and sheer cliff drops to visit the poor farming community in Central Java, where online classes are out of the question due to a lack of Internet service — a luxury few parents could afford anyway.Not only is Suroto risking death or serious illness from COVID-19, he is violating government orders not to hold in-person classes to prevent the spread of the disease.last_img read more

Gov. Wolf at Process Tech Education Center Groundbreaking Vows to Build Strongest Workforce in the Nation

first_img Jobs That Pay,  Press Release Monaca, PA – Governor Tom Wolf today vowed to build the strongest workforce in the nation, citing an example set by the continued expansion of the Shell Center for Process Technology Education at the Community College of Beaver County. While at the center’s Phase II groundbreaking ceremony, the governor congratulated the college for its efforts to train skilled professionals for careers at the Shell Ethylene Cracker Plant and related industry facilities.“When you have a project like the Shell Ethylene Cracker Plant that has the potential to create more than 100,000 direct and indirect jobs, you need to find ways to train the workforce, and collaborative efforts like this between education providers and employers are one of the best ways to do that,” Gov. Wolf said.Last year the college secured a $1 million gift from Shell and a $1 million grant from the Richard King Mellon Foundation to help fund the Phase II addition to the Shell Center for Process Technology Education. The Pennsylvania Department of Education provided a matching $2 million grant to move forward with the construction for which the groundbreaking took place today.CCBC’s four-semester associate in applied science program in Process Technology, or PTEC, trains students to be process technicians. These professionals are responsible for the set-up, operation, monitoring, and control of today’s advanced manufacturing facilities and processes. Graduates are equipped to fill critical roles for high-demand, high-earning careers in industries that include chemical, petrochemical, nuclear power, and steel manufacturing among others.One of Gov. Wolf’s initiatives to strengthen Pennsylvania’s workforce is the new Keystone Economic Development and Workforce Command Center, which is led by a team of three private sector industry leaders and three of Wolf Administration cabinet secretaries working together to identify and quickly react to roadblocks faced by businesses in Pennsylvania.The Command Center is constantly seeking creative solutions to address the state’s education and workforce needs through employer engagement, and sharing these promising practices so workers can easily find the next steps to move out of a low-wage job and into a family-sustaining career and existing businesses can find skilled workers to fill openings so potential businesses see that Pennsylvania has the workforce it needs.In addition to the Command Center, Gov. Wolf’s plan to create the strongest 21st workforce includes:• Expanding PAsmart, a new innovative $30 million investment in STEM and computer science education, apprenticeships and job training that prioritizes partnerships among schools, employers and communities. The governor is proposing an additional $10 million for PAsmart to expand job training to more adult workers.• Proposing the Statewide Workforce, Education, and Accountability Program (SWEAP) in the 2019-20 budget. SWEAP builds on the success of PAsmart to provide opportunities for Pennsylvanians from birth to retirement. The plan expands access to early childhood education, increases investments in schools, and partners with the private sector.• Launching the Apprenticeship and Training Office resulting in 138 new sponsors and 193 new apprenticeship programs or occupations, increasing the total number of registered apprentices to 16,866 statewide.• Starting the Manufacturing PA Initiative to support critical training in the important sector of that economy.• Joining the Skillful State Network, a nonprofit initiative of the Markle Foundation to emphasize the importance of skills so workers, particularly those without four-year college degrees, can get good jobs in the changing economy.“As a business owner, I recognize the importance of workforce development,” Gov. Wolf said. “So, I’ve set an ambitious goal of making Pennsylvania’s workforce the strongest in the nation. We want to be ready to heed the call when a company, like Shell, decides to call Pennsylvania home.” Gov. Wolf at Process Tech Education Center Groundbreaking Vows to Build Strongest Workforce in the Nation May 02, 2019center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Industriens hails role of active management in 2015 results

first_imgThe pension fund said 2015 had been a very unsettled year with many economic and political factors at play, and that this had increased risk on financial markets.While equities produced high returns in the first quarter, the picture then changed markedly over the course of April, and the turbulence continued for the rest of the year, it said.Industriens said it had made good returns in its DKK38.6bn portfolio of equities, with Danish shares producing 33.3% – 2.5 percentage points higher than the market as a whole – and foreign shares generating 6.4%, which beat the market by 3.4 percentage points.Mortensen said: “We invested in the right shares, and at the same time our external managers did well, which also shows the value creation of our active management for members’ pension savings.”Unlisted investments ended the year with an overall return of 15.7%, with private equity alone returning 21.9%.Its portfolio of unlisted investments in Denmark and abroad now totals DKK31.8bn, having been built up to this level over many years.Mortensen said unlisted investments contributed significantly to the total return, making a decisive difference at a time of low interest rates and instability on the financial markets, and that the assets had added stability to the whole portfolio.Fixed interest assets, however, produced low or negative returns.Nominal Gilt-edged bonds returned 0.5% in 2015, index-linked Gilts gave 1%, and corporate bonds – which make up 30.8% of the overall portfolio – made a 1.8% loss. Industriens Pension in Denmark has reported a 6.7% overall return for 2015 in preliminary annual results and said its active management produced a good level of outperformance.In absolute terms, the pension fund’s investments returned DKK8.6bn (€1.1bn).Back in November, the DKK147bn (€19.7bn) labour-market pension fund reported it had produced a pre-tax return of 3.8% for the first nine months of 2015.Laila Mortensen, Industriens Pension’s chief executive, said: “Both the active management of equities and bonds and unlisted asset classes delivered good results, which has ensured all members a significant return on their pension savings.”last_img read more

South Ripley High School senior named “2018 Lilly Endowment Community Scholar’

first_imgFrom left: Rod Hite, SRHS Principal, Trace Tucker, Toria Tucker, Denise Tucker and Joe Ralston, SRHS Guidance Counselor.Ripley County, In. — The Ripley County Community Foundation, Inc. is pleased to announce that Toria Tucker has been named Ripley County’s 2018 Lilly Endowment Community Scholar.  Toria will receive full tuition to the Indiana College or University of her choice and a $900 yearly stipend for required books and equipment.Toria is the daughter of Trace and Denise Tucker of Versailles and is a senior at South Ripley High School.  Toria is a class officer, a Senior Mentor, is the Feature and Social Media Editor of the school newspaper, and a four year member of the varsity volleyball and basketball teams.  She was the County Vice Chairman at Hoosier Girls State, is a Board Member of Champions Together, and is a Special Olympics Summer Games volunteer.“I’ve known the Tucker family for a number of years and witnessed Toria progress from elementary school through Junior High and now as a senior. She is a very special young lady who displays the intangibles in life that make a person successful. She is a soft spoken leader in our building, someone who displays compassion, dedication, and zeal in every opportunity that she pursues. I have no doubt she is a student who will represent the Lilly Foundation with honor throughout her college years. All of the South Ripley family is very proud of Toria and very happy for her family and we wish her the best in her future endeavors” stated Rod Hite, South Ripley Principal.Toria stated, “Thank you so much for selecting me as the recipient of the Lilly Endowment Community Scholarship for Ripley County. Being able to go to college without the burden of large student loan debt is a dream come true! I am extremely grateful to my school and family who prepared me since preschool, and especially during the selection process. This scholarship has already opened many doors to my future; I promise to use this generous gift to the best of my abilities in order to make a difference in the world. Thank you again for this tremendous opportunity!”The four finalists are Olivia Allen of Sunman, a senior at East Central and the daughter of Stephen and Debra Allen; Jordan Healy of Milan, a senior at Milan High School and daughter of Richard and Gayle Healy; Quinten Hylton-Gowdy of Batesville, a senior at Batesville High School and son of Jamie and Janet Hon; and Madeline Pierson of Batesville, a senior at Batesville High School and daughter of Ben and Molly Pierson.  Each of these finalists will receive a $2,000 Ripley County Community Foundation Scholarship in their freshman year and will receive a Grateful Family Scholarship in their sophomore year.The Ripley County Community Foundation Scholarship Committee is composed of individuals representing all areas of Ripley County.  The selection process is rigorous and designed to avoid bias for person or school.  The Ripley County Community Foundation strives to select a well-rounded student who represents all the best of what it means to be a Hoosier and a Ripley County resident, and forwards the names of finalists to Independent Colleges of Indiana for final selection of the scholarship recipient.  The Board of Directors is proud of Toria and the finalists and is excited to follow them through college and into adulthood.last_img read more

Lambert hails Benteke

first_img Benteke made an £8million move from Genk to Villa last summer and has so far scored 15 goals, forming an effective partnership with 10-goal Andreas Weimann. The Belgian has inevitably been the subject of speculation linking him with potential moves away from Villa this summer. Lambert said: “Will Benteke be coveted by a lot of clubs? It’s a hard one to say because he has only been here for a few months, less than a year. “I don’t know whether people will say ‘Let’s see how he does next year’, or do they go, ‘We’ll take a chance’. “I don’t think you can stop clubs from trying to make a bid for him. “I can’t stop that, but the fact is that the big lad has three years left (of his contract), he’s only 22, and he has been playing well. “They might take a punt. He has a few years left here. It’s not something I worry about. I know he has been playing well.” Lambert admits the winner of the prestigious award is likely to be one from Robin van Persie, Gareth Bale and Luis Suarez after their feats with Manchester United, Tottenham and Liverpool. But the Villa manager named Benteke when asked for his list of potential candidates for the final list from which the winner will be decided, saying: “Has Benteke an outside chance? I don’t know. He’s had a great season, Christian, but I also think the lad at Swansea (Michu) has had a great season. I think people will look at the big three, Van Persie, Bale and Suarez, to maybe get it.” Paul Lambert has pinpointed Aston Villa striker Christian Benteke as a candidate for the PFA Player of The Year award shortlist.center_img Press Associationlast_img read more

971 players register for Indian Premier League 2020 auction

first_imgNew Delhi: 971 players have registered for the upcoming auction for the 2020 season of the Indian Premier League (IPL), the league said in a release on Monday. 73 spots are up for grabs and the franchises have until 5 p.m., December 9 to submit their shortlist of players that will make the final auction list.”The VIVO IPL Player Registration closed on 30th November with 971 players (713 Indian and 258 overseas players) signing up to be a part of the VIVO IPL 2020 Player Auction set to take place in Kolkata on 19th December 2019.”The league provided a breakdown of the registered players. 634 of the 971 are uncapped Indian players while 60 are uncapped Indian players who have played at least one IPL match. 60 more players are uncapped international players while there are 196 capped international players in the fray. 19 capped Indian players are in the list while two players are from associate nations. Hugh Edmeades will once again be the auctioneer.Among the foreign players, the most have come from Australia (55) while South Africa (54) comes a close second. There are 39 Sri Lankan players, 34 West Indies players, 24 players from New Zealand, 22 England players and 19 players from Afghanistan. There are only six players from Bangladesh, three from Zimbabwe and one from the USA. IANSAlso Read: BCCI Plans Game-Changer ‘Power Player’ in Indian Premier LeagueAlso Watch: Deer Calf Rescued by Local people at Laharighat in Morigaonlast_img read more

Beat writers unanimously pick Syracuse to take care of St. Bonaventure

first_img Facebook Twitter Google+ A season ago, St. Bonaventure (4-8) came to the Carrier Dome and upset Syracuse (8-4) in overtime. But this isn’t the same Bonnies, and they enter on a three-game losing streak before Saturday’s game in the Dome. SU comes off a bounceback win over Arkansas State after two-straight losses before that.Here’s what our beat writers think will happen after Saturday’s 2 p.m. tip-off.Billy Heyen (10-2)Night and daySyracuse 77, St. Bonaventure 61Syracuse’s loss to St. Bonaventure a year ago was legitimate, but the Bonnies are a vastly different team this year. They lost their two senior guards to graduation, and instead rely heavily on some freshmen to make plays that they aren’t quite ready to make consistently. The Orange shouldn’t have any trouble in going into ACC play with two-straight wins. The biggest key for SU, beyond just a win, will be continuing to “scratch the surface,” as Jim Boeheim said, on the offense it’ll need to be successful in conference play.Charlie DiSturco (9-3)What’s a Bonnie?Syracuse 68, St. Bonaventure 55AdvertisementThis is placeholder textThis is Syracuse’s last nonconference game, and one that’s a must win. With Frank Howard nearing 100 percent and the Orange trying to reconfigure its offense, Saturday is a perfect opportunity to gain some momentum entering ACC play. The Bonnies enter this matchup off a loss to Northeastern, a team SU beat by 23. The Orange should have no problem walking away with its second straight win.Matthew Gutierrez (8-4)Bonnie & ClydeSyracuse 70, St. Bonaventure 62All of this time off provides Syracuse a buffer. A buffer before the rigors of conference play, time to rest and reload and practices to maybe develop some scoring tactics. Senior point guard Frank Howard could use the days to continue to progress and get back to his former self. The Orange will win its final game of 2018 and get another week off before conference play starts Jan. 5 in South Bend, Indiana. Comments Published on December 28, 2018 at 10:44 amlast_img read more

Local GAA action

first_imgCarrick Swans have beaten Ballingarry in the South Tipp Under 21 ‘A’ hurling semi-final replay.The final score in Monroe was Carrick Swans 6-4 Ballingarry 1-10.Swans will play Kilsheelan in the final. Elsewhere, Newport Gaels came up against Cappawhite/Treacys in the County Under 21 ‘B’ Hurling semi-final in Lattin. After fighting back impressively the game finished Cappawhite/Treacys 1-10 Newport Gaels 1-9.last_img

Maher calls for early end to college competitions

first_imgWilliam Maher believes finishing both the Sigerson and Fitzgibbon Cups before Christmas would ease the demands on talented young players during the early months of the year.This year the finals of the football and hurling competitions will be played on February 18th and 25th respectively.The Tipp boss argues that moving them forward could, if combined with other measures, contribute to making things easier for local fixture planners…last_img