John Mayer Calls Dead & Company The Best Thing That’s Happened To His Career

first_imgWith their recent tour announcement, fans can rest assured that Dead & Company will be returning triumphantly in 2017. The vivacious ensemble sees Grateful Dead members Bob Weir, Bill Kreutzmann and Mickey Hart team with Oteil Burbridge, Jeff Chimenti, and most surprisingly, John Mayer.Now set to embark on their third major tour (fall 2015 and summer 2016 being the other two), Mayer has had some time to reflect on the impact those shows have had on his career. In a new interview with CBS New York’s Fresh 102.7, Mayer talks about the different experiences as a solo artist versus a member of a band, and how that has helped him personally grow as a musician and as a person.You can watch this new interview in the video player below.last_img

‘Malcolm & Marie’ director reveals origins of buzzy film

first_imgNEW YORK (AP) — The global pandemic was not about to stop filmmaker Sam Levinson without a fight, literally. The creator of HBO’s “Euphoria” found his hit series shuttered so he pivoted to writing and directing “Malcolm & Marie,” a film about an epic lovers’ quarrel starring John David Washington and Zendaya. Set in a luxury California beach house, Washington’s Malcolm, an up-and-coming director, and Zendaya’s Marie, an out-of-work actress, have returned after a party where his film has premiered to rapturous applause. But he forgot to thank Marie and that leads to an outpouring of simmering grievances. “Malcolm & Marie” debuts on Netflix on Friday.last_img

Long Ireland Brews Up Good ‘Craic’ in Riverhead’s Polish Town

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York West of downtown Riverhead is historic Polish Town, which pays tribute to the traditions of Poland’s welcoming spirit demonstrated at the Polish Town Fair that attracts thousands every August.Since 2011, another proud European heritage of fun entertainment, called ‘craic’— pronounced “crack,” it means fun in Gaelic — has been celebrated in Polish Town at the Long Ireland Beer Company brewery and tasting room. It was founded nearly a decade ago by longtime friends Dan Burke and Greg Martin, who, like many home brewers, dreamed of their own brewery. They apprenticed and contract brewed their favorite recipe at Connecticut’s New England Brewing Company. They set up shop after getting a positive response to this beer, which they named Celtic Ale.“We must have home brewed this beer 60 to 70 times in our garage,” says Martin, “until we got the recipe to where we wanted it.”They settled on a 9,000-square-foot Pulaski Street building that formerly housed an Agway store. Long Ireland became such an integral part of the neighborhood that in 2014 it brewed the special Polish Town Pilsner for the Polish Town Fair’s 40th anniversary. The Polish-style lager, made with pilsner malt and traditional Saaz, Czech and Tettnang hops, is so popular that it is now available all year.Year-round offerings are still led by the flagship Celtic Ale, a malty red ale similar to Irish Reds like Smithwick’s but with richer malt flavor and lower carbonation. The recipe uses four malts: two-row pale malt, caramel, Vienna and chocolate. Flaked oats and honey give it a sweet flavor with hints of toffee, one hop, Willamette, provides just mild bitterness for a smooth finish.Other popular beers include a refreshing Raspberry Wheat and seasonal brews such as Summer Ale, Pumpkin Ale, Winter Ale, NoFo Farmhouse Saison Ale, Chocolate Porter, and the delicious Black Friday Imperial Stout, released on the day after Thanksgiving. One of Long Ireland’s original offerings, Breakfast Stout, was retired but replaced by a dry Irish-style stout, Hooligan Irish Stout, which may soon join the year-round offerings.Long Ireland also recognized growing demand for hoppy pale ales and IPAs by brewing special beers including single hopped beers like Mos Def Mosaic IPA and Balor IPA, made with Citra hops and named after a one-eyed giant from Irish mythology. The brewery also uses hops from local farms, such as the Fresh Hop Co-Op Session IPA brewed last fall with a blend of Centennial and Chinook hops picked from L.I. Hops in Jamesport and Wesnofske Farms and North Fork Hops in Southold.The brewery kept up with the canned-beer trend and last year shifted production from bottles to cans. A recently installed canning line will produce 50 cases per hour of both 12-ounce and 16-ounce cans.“The new line will give us more flexibility to do short runs of innovative beers that we can put out to local beer stores that have really supported us,” says Martin.Long Ireland has been distributed across LI and New York City by Clare Rose since 2012 and hopes to expand distribution later this year.“We’re currently producing around 4,000 barrels a year,” adds Martin. “But we’ve got plenty of room to expand at this location.”Long Ireland is also well known for the popular events it hosts at the brewery. The Long Ireland Pintwood Derby is a take-off on the old Boy Scout car races, and draws sellout crowds to the brewery. Its Halfway to St. Patrick’s Party in mid-September and 5K running races are held in summer and fall.Long Ireland also hosts fun events during the week in its tasting room, including Retro Video Game Night in collaboration with East End Gaming and Vinyl Night with Riverhead’s Sunday Records. Local business Brew Crew Cycles, just relocated next door and the brewery will continue to be a popular stop on the group bike tours offered  beginning in April.“We love to do cross-promotions with other local businesses and help our community grow and thrive,” says Martin.Long Ireland Beer Company is located at 817 Pulaski St. in Riverhead. They can be reached at 631-403-4303 or longirelandbeer.com.last_img read more

5 ways to make your MSR’s more productive

first_imgMember Service Representatives are not only the face of your credit union, but they are the lifeline to smooth front-end operations. If your CU is trying to evolve and grow, then it’s imperative to consider ways to increase the productivity of your employees, without wearing them out with more responsibility than they can handle. Here are 5 ideas you can implement at your CU to make your MSR’s more productive in their daily work:Create an environment that makes work enjoyable. You want your team to treat members with friendly attitudes, patience and understanding. You also expect staff to inform members of additional services that can improve their experience at the CU. To create that environment, you need to extend your MSRs the same courtesies and development opportunities. If MSRs feel that work is rewarding, and enjoy serving and solving member problems, the better they will be at it. Happy employees mean happy members.Encourage proper etiquette. In our article 6 Things MSR’s Should Remind Themselves of Daily we discuss how language and posture earn trust.  Scientific studies confirm that body language is all-important when it comes to making first impressions, forming new relationships, and maintaining existing relationships. The 7%-38%-55% rule, postulated by psychologist Albert Mehrabian, points to three elements that inform first impressions and earn trust: Words are 7% of the message, tone of voice is 38%, and body language is 55%. Remind MSRs that, while what they say is important, 93% of their interactions are perceived by tone, attitude, and nonverbal cues. Their attitude can make or break the member/CU bond. If the members come out with a positive feeling about their interaction, they’re more likely to encourage others to join. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Long Island Covid-19 Hospitalizations More Than Triple in Three Weeks

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York There are 538 people hospitalized for Covid-19 on Long Island, more than triple from three weeks ago, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said at a press briefing today.Long Island had 172 Covid-19 hospitalizations three weeks ago. The upward trend in hospitalizations is occurring statewide as cases have been rising in all regions since last month.“First time around, we had a New York City, downstate, Long Island, Westchester problem,” Cuomo said. “That was actually beneficial in a way because we could bring resources from upstate to help downstate. We don’t have that option here.”Today, County Executive Laura Curran said there are 274 Covid-19 patients in the county’s 11 hospitals — 36 in ICU and 25 on ventilators. Yesterday, Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said there were 238 Covid-19 patients in its hospitals, with 46 in ICU.Earlier this week, Curran and Bellone joined Cuomo’s press briefing via Zoom as he spoke about a statewide plan for managing hospital loads. The state’s cluster zone system, which determines the yellow, orange, and red areas, will now be based on hospitalization rate, death rate, case rate, available hospital beds, available ICU beds, available staff, PPE, and equipment availability.All hospitals must identify retired nurses and doctors who they could call back should they need to combat staff shortages, Cuomo said. Emergency field hospitals, including the ones at SUNY Old Westbury and Stony Brook, must secure staffing and prepare for Covid-19 patients in the event of a surge, and all hospitals must plan to add 50 percent capacity. Individual hospital systems, such as Northwell Health, must balance patients among its hospitals. In addition, all hospitals should be prepared to implement statewide “surge and flex,” which distributes the load of patients among all hospitals.“We lived this nightmare, we learned from this nightmare,” Cuomo said, “and we’re going to correct for the lessons we learned during this nightmare.”last_img read more

Booker’s rant reveals Democrats’ Trump obsession

first_imgYou may be there awhile. And, when pressed for a response, be ready with an appropriate line, such as, “I’m sorry. Was there a question in there?”Learn to swat imaginary flies and squint as if you notice a spider on the head of the inquisitor.Anyway, Booker may have been the most wincingly awful to watch, but he is by no means the only Democratic White House hopeful jockeying to position himself or herself as the most liberal, the most outraged, the most synthetically sincere of 2020 contenders.Booker’s pinwheel-eyed fulmination takes its place alongside similarly shameful rants from Sens. Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren, Democratic National Committee Chairman Tom Perez and other liberal one-uppers stumbling over themselves to prove their anti-Trump bona fides.They may think they’re feeding their Democratic base — after all, social media has turned anti-Trump outrage into an industry — but there are two problems with this assumption.First, even the most rabid anti-Trumpists want substance from their Democratic candidates, and Booker and others have produced none.Second, in their lemming-like scramble to the fringe, Democrats are abandoning the sensible center, where most Americans live and the position from which they wish their lawmakers to govern. The pain and drama of it all was just too much.And it’s only January. The first presidential primary is more than two years away.Booker’s rant is only an early taste of many more to come from an increasingly clamorous field of Democratic presidential hopefuls.The Democratic Party is lurching irreparably to the left and has nothing to offer voters in 2020 other than outrage over Trump’s latest tweet and the resuscitation of tired policies that would return a booming U.S. economy to the stagnant Obama years.It’s too bad Nielsen couldn’t have punctuated Booker’s rant with a well-played stage yawn, giving his self-serving jeremiad the treatment it deserved.Over the next two years, more Cabinet officials will be testifying before Congress and the Democratic Outrage Machine will pounce with their rehearsed lines and faux outrage.Pro tip to the unlucky witnesses: Bring reading material.  For months, I have written about the Democratic Party’s dangerous lurch to the left.Beginning with support for the Sanders-backed promise of universal health care, Democrats are now in the position where the only way they can distinguish themselves and prevent an onslaught of attacks from their progressive base is to take on and embrace increasingly polarized leftist positions and a continuing stream of anti-Trump venom.Even the liberal New York Times has taken note with the recent headline on an article by Sheryl Gay Stolberg, “Senate Democrats Make Hard Turn Left in Warming Up for 2020 Race.”The fact that Democrats are abandoning any notion of compromise and refusing to appeal to independent and moderate voters should come as no surprise.The party has been hijacked by radical voices from within, and what we are seeing now is only the beginning of what is to come.Ed Rogers is a political consultant and a veteran of the Ronald Reagan and George H.W. Bush White Houses and several national campaigns. More from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationEDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Thruway tax unfair to working motoristsFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?center_img Categories: Editorial, OpinionAnybody who watched the clumsy histrionics of Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J., at last week’s Senate grilling of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen had to feel a little sorry for him.His overacting was on full display before the Senate Judiciary Committee and TV cameras.Booker posed, pretended, preened and generally made a fool of himself shouting at Nielsen about President Donald Trump’s latest inexplicable comments regarding immigrants from certain parts of the world.In releasing his almost-comical wrath, Booker’s performance was so awful and cringe-worthy that I actually felt embarrassed for him.He even copped to weeping “tears of rage.”last_img read more

Majority of US firms in Hong Kong concerned about security law: Amcham

first_imgThe Amcham survey, published on Monday and to which 183 or 15 percent of its members responded on July 6-9, showed 36.6 percent of respondents were “somewhat” concerned and 51 percent were “extremely concerned” about the legislation.More than two-thirds of the respondents were more concerned than a month ago, when the full details of the law, which came into force just before the anniversary of the former British colony’s return to Chinese rule on July 1, 1997, were unveiled.The legislation, which sees a Chinese intelligence agency openly operating in the city for the first time and gives police and mainland agents broad powers beyond the scrutiny of courts, raises a broad spectrum of worries for US companies.Some 65 percent were concerned about the “ambiguity in its scope and enforcement” and roughly 61 percent were concerned about the independence of Hong Kong’s judicial system. A majority of United States companies in Hong Kong surveyed by the American Chamber of Commerce (Amcham) are concerned about the sweeping new national security law in the global financial hub, with a third looking to move assets or business longer-term.The legislation, which punishes secession subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison, has further strained relations between the United States and China.Read also: Over 600,000 Hong Kongers cast ‘protest’ vote against new security laws About half were concerned about the city’s status as a global finance centre and the erosion of the high degree of autonomy it was promised 23 years ago.Read also: ‘We’re next’: Hong Kong security law sends chills through TaiwanOther major concerns cited were data security, talent drain and retaliatory measures by other governments. The prospect of extraditions to mainland China, where courts are controlled by the Communist Party, was considered a “game changer” by about 46 percent, with 17 percent saying it wasn’t.About 49 percent said the law would have a negative impact on their business, while some 13 percent said it would have a positive impact. Some 30 percent considered moving capital, assets or business out of Hong Kong in the medium-to-long term, while 5 percent said they consider doing so in the short-term.More than half of the respondents said they felt less safe about living and working in Hong Kong. Also about half said they personally considered leaving the city.Topics :last_img read more

Governor Wolf Orders Commonwealth Flags at Half-Staff to Honor Firefighter Matt LeTourneau

first_img Flag Order,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Governor Tom Wolf has ordered all commonwealth flags on the Capitol Complex and at all commonwealth facilities in the City of Philadelphia to fly at half-staff starting tomorrow to honor fallen City of Philadelphia firefighter Lieutenant Matt LeTourneau.“We are mourning the tragic death of Lt. Matthew LeTourneau from injuries received battling a significant fire over the weekend,” Governor Wolf said. “I urge all Pennsylvanians to join me in keeping his family, his colleagues and all our first responders in your thoughts. His sacrifice for his fellow citizens will not be forgotten.”Lieutenant Matt LeTourneau passed away on January 6th from injuries sustained while working in the line of duty.The Commonwealth Flag shall be lowered from sunrise on Tuesday, January 9, 2018 through sunset Saturday, January 13, 2018. Pennsylvanians are encouraged to participate in this tribute.The United States Flag should remain at full-staff during this tribute. January 08, 2018 Governor Wolf Orders Commonwealth Flags at Half-Staff to Honor Firefighter Matt LeTourneaucenter_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

Buyers tickled pink at their investment in Shailer Park

first_img10 Yeeda Court, Shailer ParkA BRIGHT pink architecturally designed home at Shailer Park has sold for $712,500.LJ Hooker Kenmore principal Julie Crittenden said the family that bought the contemporary home at 10 Yeeda Court knew from the moment they walked in that it would be theirs.“The people who bought it are a nice young family and they just loved it straight away – they just loved the style and the character,” Mrs Crittenden said. “A property like that is such a character home.”The two-storey house, which sits on a 1120sq m block, has a bright pink driveway and pink and white walls on the outside. More from newsCrowd expected as mega estate goes under the hammer7 Aug 2020Hard work, resourcefulness and $17k bring old Ipswich home back to life20 Apr 202010 Yeeda Court, Shailer ParkInside, it is a modern marvel with splashes of colour.Mrs Crittenden said the design was unlike any other she has seen in the area.“It’s an interesting floorplan – it’s like two houses stuck together,” Mrs Crittenden said.“The home was designed specifically for that block.”Mrs Crittenden added that it generated a lot of interest but some people couldn’t move past the pink driveway.She said they managed to find the perfect buyers who were happy to call it theirs.last_img read more

Clean Energy Fuels names new board member

first_imgClean Energy Fuels, the California-based liquefied natural gas (LNG) supplier for North American transport industry named Philippe Charleux, senior vice president of Total Marketing Services to its board. Charleux will replace Total executive Momar Nguer, president of TMS, who is stepping down, and join Philippe Montantême, senior vice president, strategy marketing research at TMS, who already serves on Clean Energy’s board.Charleux is senior vice president Lubricants and Specialties at TMS and is also a member of Total’s Group Performance Management Committee.He joined Total in 1986 as a research engineer and has held many positions, including engineering, product quality, sales, strategy, and executive leadership roles such as general manager, before being appointed vice president.Clean Energy also said that its longtime director and former chairman, Warren Mitchell, notified the board that he will retire effective February 26, 2020. Mitchell, a former chairman and president of Southern Gas Company, was one of the company’s first board members.last_img read more