Dining halls seek to decrease waste

first_imgThe semi-annual Waste-Free Wednesdays campaign, which took place during April, aimed to decrease the food and liquid waste produced at Notre Dame. Campaign co-chair Anna Gorman said the project seeks to educate students about the number of Americans who struggles to put food on the table. “One in six Americans struggle with hunger, and the statistic is even higher for children,” she said. “We waste roughly enough food in our country to provide food for all those who are hungry.” Each Wednesday in April from 6 to 7 p.m., volunteers handed out raffle tickets to students who cleared their trays at the dining halls. The winner of the raffle is awarded 100 Flex Points. Gorman said the campaign, which is co-sponsored by the Office of Sustainability, Notre Dame Food Services, GreeND and the Hunger Coalition, had a total of about 1,200 participants in the past four weeks. Prior to the start of the Waste- Free Wednesdays campaign in 2008, the average student wasted about five ounces of food per meal, adding up to nearly two tons of food wasted each day. By the end of the fall 2012 semester, the waste dropped to 3.26 ounces per meal, Gorman said. This semester, Gorman said the waste is slightly higher, with an average of 3.5 ounces per student, but it has still drastically decreased compared to the 2008 statistics. The Office of Sustainability has also contributed to reducing waste by posting educational posters in the dining halls to encourage students and faculty to only take what they can finish. According to the office’ website, “Food scraps from the main Food Service facility are used for cattle feed, totaling about 37,000 pounds per year. Leftover cooked food is donated to two local homeless shelters.” Gorman is similarly concerned about the impact of food waste to the environment. “We are forcing our farms to produce more than we need, hurting our land. In addition, food waste produces methane, a potent greenhouse gas,” Gorman said. With the combined efforts of the co-sponsors of Waste-Free Wednesdays, Gorman said the University can provide more food to the needy, answer a social responsibility and avoid putting unnecessary strains on the environment. The challenge is letting people know they can easily have a large impact on hunger, Gorman said. “Waste-Free Wednesdays could be more effective if we were better able to educate students,” she said.last_img read more

Senate amends constitution and announces class council leaders

first_imgStudent senate passed 10 resolutions and two senatorial orders Wednesday night, making numerous changes to the constitution of the undergraduate student body and ordering the suspension of the rising junior and senior class council elections. Since the elections for both councils each had only one ticket, a senatorial order was proposed and passed for each class council to suspend the elections and declare the unopposed ticket the winner. For the rising senior class, the only ticket included Sara Dugan for president, Janet Stengle for vice president, Paul Stevenson for treasurer and Matthew Peters for secretary.The sole ticket for the class of 2019 listed Michael Conlon for president, Daniel Hopkinson for vice president, Eddie Griesedieck for treasurer and Jane Driano for secretary. (Editor’s Note: Eddie Griesedieck is a photographer for The Observer).All 10 of the resolutions were passed with strong support and included amending the responsibilities of the parliamentarian, off campus council and the departments of gender relations, University policy, student life, athletics, diversity and inclusion, faith and service, and health and wellness. A resolution indicating which members are required to attend the weekly executive cabinet meeting was also passed.Brian Fremeau, director of facilities for the Campus Crossroads project, gave a presentation to explain the plans for the addition of three new buildings surrounding the football stadium: Duncan Student Center, O’Neill Hall and Corbett Family Hall. He also discussed other enhancements to the stadium.Construction on Campus Crossroads, which began November 2014, is expected to conclude in August 2017. Fremeau’s presentation included images of the partially built rooms compared with artist’s representations of the finished interiors.Fremeau said the Duncan Student Center will not be open during the fall 2017 semester, as the various groups slated to occupy the space will be moving in. “We do expect in spring 2018, at the start of the semester, the doors will fly open and it will be open to everyone,” he said.Fremeau also said that while he cannot currently say which dining options will be available in the new student center, he expects this information to be publicly released soon.Notre Dame Day program director Pablo Martinez also delivered a presentation, discussing Notre Dame Day and the opportunities for club fundraising that it offers, as well as the opportunity to show alumni, parents and friends what students are doing.“It’s one way for us to really engage alumni, parents and friends when they’re not here on campus,” Martinez said. “A lot of people come back sometime during the fall for a football game or a tailgate or a reunion, but other than that people don’t know what’s going on — people don’t know the great work that students are doing. This is our way of showing them.”Julia Dunbar, director of health and wellness, announced that “Love Your Body Week” — hosted by the Gender Relation Center — will kick off Sunday with a talk on eating disorders. On Monday, a “Berry Brunch Break” will be provided in the LaFortune Student Center. The week will conclude with a yoga session, hosted by the McDonald Center for Student Well-Being.To conclude the meeting, student body vice president Becca Blais announced the Notre Dame Box Office is now selling $5 tickets for Show Some Skin, an event in which students anonymously submit stories to be performed by other students as monologues. The event, according to its website, “gives voice to unspoken stories about identity and difference.”Tags: Senate, Student Gov, Student governmentlast_img read more

Students spend fall break in Appalachia for seminar

first_imgSophomore Diane Lee said she had not showered in a week.Her wrists cramped from spending one morning that week digging a ditch and spreading mulch around an orchard, Lee said, but she made her way across campus eagerly, her anticipation to shower propelling her forward.“It was a pretty shocking experience,” she said.Lee, along with about 240 other students, spent fall break in the Appalachia region as part of the Appalachia Seminar, a one-credit-hour course with an immersion experience offered through the Center for Social Concerns (CSC).Kyle Lantz, assistant program director of Social Concerns Seminars, directs the fall semester programs and said the course introduces students to the complexity of history and current realities in the Appalachian region.“We look at the current challenges facing the region [and] the vibrancy of the culture utilizing Catholic Social Tradition as a way to approach these communities with humility and openness to learning,” Lantz said in an email. “This seminar is about learning through experience and encounter so the immersion is an essential part of the course. Students take part in direct service as well as conversations and engagement with community members.”With 20 teams each assigned to a different community in the Appalachia region of the country, Lantz said each immersion program focused on certain themes such as housing repair, education, health, environment, energy, poverty, sustainability or cultural engagement.According to the CSC’s website, to prepare for the experience, the accepted applicants of the program take a weekly class where they discuss the seminar’s themes and form individual teams leading up to the immersion.“Our community partners continually tell us that our students come very prepared and they especially enjoy the Notre Dame groups,” Lantz said. “While students do encounter challenging situations at times, they come away ​with very positive things to say about the people they met and a realization that there is need for justice in all corners of our world.”Of the community partners, Lantz said one of them was new this semester while many were with people and organizations the CSC has worked with for years. Overall, he said the goal is for students to take away a better understanding of the layered complexities of social challenges.“We hope [students] see the resilience and hospitality in the communities who welcome them,” Lantz said. “We hope they consider ways to become more active citizens moving forward in light of what they learned on immersion and in light of what Catholic Social Tradition calls us toward.”Along with direct service-work, Lantz said certain programs also engaged students in a variety of activities, including religious services, local music events, community potlucks and high school sporting events.Lee, who explored food justice with the Grow Ohio Valley program in Wheeling, West Virginia, said she learned not just about food injustice in the area, but also about other issues residents are facing, such as homelessness and those brought about by mining and fracking practices.“Each day was different, but most days we were doing some sort of work around one of the different farm or garden sites,” Lee said. “Some days we would go weed through the orchard or spread mulch or do other manual labor like that. But we also had a lot of fun activities that they had planned for us, so we got to visit a beekeeper for example and hear from different people in the community.”According to the Appalachia Seminar website, the immersion maintains that students live “intentionally and simply,” with some sites allowing “fewer showers” or “simpler sleeping arrangements.” Lee said her group was the first in Wheeling to all accomplish the challenge of not showering throughout the entire week.Lee said her group also participated in the food stamp challenge, in which each member of the group was given the same amount of money — $1.25 — for lunch that each member of a similarly-sized family on food stamps would receive in reality.“[The immersion] was a very different experience from most people’s fall breaks,” Lee said. “I thought it was going to be a sobering and almost depressing experience, but all the people who were working with Grow Ohio Valley and all those different organizations had such true and pure joy for everything they were doing which was so inspiring to see.”Sophomore Tim Thompson said he and eight others visited McDowell County, one of the poorest areas in West Virginia, through the Sharing With Appalachian People program. There, he said the group split up and dedicated themselves to home repair for two different houses.“Before I started the seminar, I thought it was just going to be a service trip and I was just going to be doing service-work with Notre Dame people, but I felt like there was a lot of value going somewhere completely new,” Thompson said. “Now that I’ve seen different areas of the country and people in severe poverty there, it makes me want to be more involved in the community and escape the Notre Dame bubble to see other things.”Thompson said seeing how complicated one person’s situation could be and the number of struggles a family could go through by themselves was an eye-opening experience for him. He said the program exceeded his expectations despite some of the tedious work, such as redoing an entire kitchen and scraping off old paint, that they conducted.“Being a Notre Dame student, I always want to analyze situations and try to fix everything and come up with big solutions and change the world, but since I’ve been [to McDowell] I realize that there are so many different problems in the area and that’s just how life is,” Thompson said. “There isn’t a single solution to everything. Everything is more complicated than what it seems. It takes good people doing small things to make a big difference.”Tags: Appalachia, Center for Social Concerns, seminar, servicelast_img read more

Uribe Inaugurates Hospital Vessel for the Pacific Coast with Italian Support

first_imgBy Dialogo June 16, 2009 Bogotá, June 15 (EFE).- Today the Colombian president Álvaro Uribe, together with Italian ambassador Gerolamo Schiavoni, inaugurated in Buenaventra (west) a hospital vessel that will provide medical assistance to the population of towns along the coastline of the Pacific Ocean and rivers that flow into that ocean. Initially, the San Raffaele will conduct two missions a month, 10 days each with the help of the institutions such as non-governmental organization called Italian Association for Solidarity between the People (Aispo) of San Raffaele Hospital from Milan (Italy), In Colombia, said initiative is led by the Italian-Colombian Foundation of Mount Tabor, and is also supported by several Italian enterprises, and the Colombian soccer player Iván Ramiro Córdoba, Inter Milán team’s defender. During the ship’s trip that will cover coastal areas and riversides of Cauca, Nariño, Valle, and Chocó departments, the crew will provide general and specialized medical consultations, dental care, gynaecology, minor surgeries and clinical laboratory analysis. After cutting the inaugural ribbon and naming the boat, the Colombian president announced that the ship will operate “as social enterprise of health,” and provide specialized medical attention. The ship’s mission is supported by the University of the Cauca, through an agreement for last year medical students to offer their services to society. The hospital ship is 26 metres long and 7 metres of beam (width) and it is laid out in four decks or levels: the upper deck, the main or social level, the physicians’ level, where the offices and labs are located, and another level, where the bedrooms are located. It also has a surgery and an X-Rays room.last_img read more

Military and Police Cooperate to Improve Public Safety in Guatemala

first_img“We have received support from friendly nations, cooperation that includes non-lethal equipment and special training for Military operations other than war. The plan we have followed for the last few years, on the orders of President Otto Pérez Molina, has been to recover capabilities in security, use those capabilities to complement law enforcement efforts, and to support the safety of civilians,” Minister of Defense Manuel López Ambrocio said on June 30, 2014. And their joint cooperative efforts are having a positive impact. For example, as of December 15, there were 4,748 killings in the country in 2014, compared to 5,155 in 2013. The security force was launched in 2000, and its 4,500 Military service members and 3,000 PNC officers concentrate their efforts in Guatemala City as well as the Departments of Zacapa, Escuintla and Huehuetenango. Ongoing cooperation The Army will continue to cooperate with the PNC to improve public safety while the police force trains the number of officers it needs to ensure security throughout the country, according to Defense Minister Ambrocio. Army Soldiers are supporting police efforts to improve security in a variety of ways. In 2014, the Army participated in 115,154 civilian security operations, which included more than 42,600 foot patrols; 26,620 security and search checkpoints; 20,040 vehicle patrols; 5,700 searches and seizures; and more than 2,000 security operations at bus stops. In addition to their Military training, Soldiers who are assigned to the Joint Security Force receive additional education on how to protect human rights and the best ways to deal with the civilian population, according to Army Colonel Manuel Pineda, Chief of the Army’s Sixth Squad. Army Soldiers are supporting police efforts to improve security in a variety of ways. In 2014, the Army participated in 115,154 civilian security operations, which included more than 42,600 foot patrols; 26,620 security and search checkpoints; 20,040 vehicle patrols; 5,700 searches and seizures; and more than 2,000 security operations at bus stops. The security force was launched in 2000, and its 4,500 Military service members and 3,000 PNC officers concentrate their efforts in Guatemala City as well as the Departments of Zacapa, Escuintla and Huehuetenango. And their joint cooperative efforts are having a positive impact. For example, as of December 15, there were 4,748 killings in the country in 2014, compared to 5,155 in 2013. But by the end of 2015, the PNC will have 35,000 officers, and the Joint Security Force might be disbanded, according to Minister of Internal Affairs Mauricio López Bonilla. “We have received support from friendly nations, cooperation that includes non-lethal equipment and special training for Military operations other than war. The plan we have followed for the last few years, on the orders of President Otto Pérez Molina, has been to recover capabilities in security, use those capabilities to complement law enforcement efforts, and to support the safety of civilians,” Minister of Defense Manuel López Ambrocio said on June 30, 2014. In 2013, law enforcement authorities recorded 4,226 homicides that were committed with firearms. That number was reduced to 3,932 in 2014. In 2013, there were 566 killings committed with knives and other bladed weapons. The number of such homicides went down to 484 in 2014. The goal is not to replace the civilian law enforcement forces, but to support them until those forces reach the quantitative and qualitative levels set forth in the government’s plan, Ambrocio said. International cooperation is an important component of the initiative. In addition to their Military training, Soldiers who are assigned to the Joint Security Force receive additional education on how to protect human rights and the best ways to deal with the civilian population, according to Army Colonel Manuel Pineda, Chief of the Army’s Sixth Squad. Soldiers trained to work with civilian population In 2013, law enforcement authorities recorded 4,226 homicides that were committed with firearms. That number was reduced to 3,932 in 2014. In 2013, there were 566 killings committed with knives and other bladed weapons. The number of such homicides went down to 484 in 2014. The goal is not to replace the civilian law enforcement forces, but to support them until those forces reach the quantitative and qualitative levels set forth in the government’s plan, Ambrocio said. Military service members who work alongside police officers are divided into nine squads; six of these are assigned to Guatemala City, with the other three conducting operations in various departments. There are 10 task forces within the squads, each of which combats a particular type of crime, such as robbery or extortion. Soldiers trained to work with civilian population Military service members who work alongside police officers are divided into nine squads; six of these are assigned to Guatemala City, with the other three conducting operations in various departments. There are 10 task forces within the squads, each of which combats a particular type of crime, such as robbery or extortion. “Once we arrive at that point, we are prepared to withdraw from the scene and focus on increasing our abilities in our own areas, and therefore we are beginning modernization processes within the military’s scope, for example, recovery of mobility; special, individual equipment; tactical communications; and weaponry,” he explained. Guatemala’s Joint Security Force, which consists of Army Soldiers and National Civil Police (PNC) officers, improves public safety by conducting patrols and vehicle searches and capturing dangerous suspects. The Army will continue to cooperate with the PNC to improve public safety while the police force trains the number of officers it needs to ensure security throughout the country, according to Defense Minister Ambrocio. By Dialogo February 05, 2015 Guatemala’s Joint Security Force, which consists of Army Soldiers and National Civil Police (PNC) officers, improves public safety by conducting patrols and vehicle searches and capturing dangerous suspects. When conducting patrols, Troops and police officers typically work in teams which consist of two Soldiers and one police officer. Checkpoints, where Troops and police officers verify that vehicles have not been stolen and are not transporting contraband, such as illegal weapons, ammunition, or drugs, are comprised of two Military members and two police officers. International cooperation is an important component of the initiative. When conducting patrols, Troops and police officers typically work in teams which consist of two Soldiers and one police officer. Checkpoints, where Troops and police officers verify that vehicles have not been stolen and are not transporting contraband, such as illegal weapons, ammunition, or drugs, are comprised of two Military members and two police officers. But by the end of 2015, the PNC will have 35,000 officers, and the Joint Security Force might be disbanded, according to Minister of Internal Affairs Mauricio López Bonilla. Ongoing cooperation “Once we arrive at that point, we are prepared to withdraw from the scene and focus on increasing our abilities in our own areas, and therefore we are beginning modernization processes within the military’s scope, for example, recovery of mobility; special, individual equipment; tactical communications; and weaponry,” he explained.last_img read more

The truth about mortgage disclosures: No signature required

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » With mortgage rates at historic lows, many credit unions are seeing an increase in mortgage application volume and credit unions are looking for ways to speed up their processing times. Some credit unions attempt to decrease their mortgage turn times by going digital, as discussed in a blogs regarding online applications and electronic signatures. Other credit unions try to make the process easier by determining which of the many disclosures must be signed, and if those signatures must be obtained upfront or can be done throughout the process or at the signing table.Many of the mortgage disclosures provided to the member do not have a federal regulatory requirement for a signature. Rather, the regulations require that the credit union provide the disclosure, so in many cases it may be sufficient for the credit union to have procedures and documentation showing that the disclosure was sent. Even if there is no regulatory requirement for a signature, there could be secondary market considerations (such as if the credit union sells loans to Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac or other purchasers) as well as possible state law requirements.Borrower’s Verification Authorization None, because this is not a federally required disclosure. However, this disclosure may fulfill a third-party’s requirement to have signed consent to share information with the credit union.last_img read more

China pledges $30 million more for WHO’s coronavirus fight

first_imgThe donation aimed to support the global fight against COVID-19, in particular strengthening health systems in developing countries, she said, adding that China had already donated $20 million to the WHO on March 11.On Wednesday, WHO Director-General Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said he hoped the Trump administration would reconsider its decision.”I hope the US believes that this an important investment, not just to help others, but for the US to stay safe also,” Tedros said during a virtual briefing.The United States contributed more than $400 million to the WHO in 2019, or roughly 15% of the organization’s budget. Topics : China said on Thursday it would donate a further $30 million to the World Health Organization (WHO), which is seeking more than $1 billion to fund its battle against the coronavirus pandemic that has killed more than 180,000 people worldwide.The pledge comes about a week after US President Donald Trump suspended funding to the WHO and accused the Geneva-based organization of promoting Chinese “disinformation” about the virus, which emerged in the central city of Wuhan last year.”At this crucial moment, supporting WHO is supporting multilateralism and global solidarity,” Hua Chunying, a spokeswoman of China’s foreign ministry, said on Twitter.last_img read more

Million-dollar beach home for $10

first_img63 Mudjimba Esplanade, Mudjimba, Sunshine CoastAmong the dream home’s features was a large plunge pool with rock face water feature. It overlooks a covered gazebo for outdoor dining and luxury barbecue kitchen with drinks fridge.The home also has a courtyard lounge complete with fire pit and fish pond. Endeavour Foundation’s next prize home on the Sunshine CoastTHIS million dollar home at Mudjimba on the Sunshine Coast is up for grabs for $10 as the next prize home to come out of Queensland.The resort-style home on millionaire’s row was bought by the Endeavour Foundation for its Beachfront Lifestyle Lottery, with funds going towards helping people with a disability. Endeavour Foundation’s next prize home on the Sunshine Coast“Ultimately, this beautiful home will help someone with a disability create a home of their own, pursuing the real possibilities within their own lives”.The prize home opened for viewing Friday February 3 with tickets available until March 22. 63 Mudjimba Esplanade, Mudjimba, Sunshine Coast.Now valued at over $1.1 million, the home at 63 Mudjimba Esplanade, Mudjimba, has three bedrooms, one study, two full baths and is less than 100 metres from the beach.More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home3 hours agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor9 hours ago“The prize home personifies relaxed coastal living,” according to the foundation, with the property suitable for both a holiday retreat or a permanent beachside home. Endeavour Foundation’s next prize home on the Sunshine CoastEndeavour Foundation executive general manager of supporter enterprises, Andrew Thomas, said the lotteries helped fund the At Home With Choices program, which builds modern, accessible houses to give people with a disability more choices about where they live.last_img read more

ISP to increase patrols in March

first_imgStatewide—The Indiana State Police is joining with other law-enforcement agencies across Indiana this March to increase dangerous and impaired driving patrols for the NCAA Tournament and St. Patrick’s Day. Drive Sober or Get Pulled Over is the important reminder coming from law enforcement agencies as the two heaviest drinking events of the year, St. Patrick’s Day and the NCAA Tournament, occur in March. All throughout March officers will be conducting federally funded overtime patrols and sobriety checkpoints in an effort to prevent dangerous and impaired driving.According to the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute, or ICJI, in March of 2019, there were 433 alcohol-related crashes across Indiana, resulting in 205 injuries and five fatalities. Of those, 65 crashes and one fatality occurred during the St. Patrick’s Day holiday weekend alone.“St. Patrick’s Day is one of, if not the biggest drinking days of the year,” said Robert Duckworth, ICJI Traffic Safety Director. “If you’re out celebrating, make the right choice and find a sober driver to get you, and your friends, home safely. Luck won’t keep you out of jail if you’re caught driving under the influence.”Impaired driving isn’t the only risk on the road in March, according to ICJI. Dangerous driving, which includes speed too fast for existing conditions and aggressive driving are also a concern and something officers will be watching for throughout the mobilization. Franklin, Ripley, and Decatur Counties have announced they will have extra officers on the roadways during March.Tips for staying safe include: Before the celebration begins, plan a safe way home.Never drive impaired.Remember: Buzzed Driving Is Drunk Driving.If you do drink, use a taxi, public transportation, ridesharing service or designate a sober friend or family member, and give them your keys.If you see a drunk driver on the road, call 911.If you know someone who is about to drive or ride impaired, take their keys and help make arrangements to get them home safely.last_img read more

Newcastle sever ties with Ben Arfa

first_img A Newcastle statement said: ” Newcastle United can today confirm that Hatem Ben Arfa and the club have reached an agreement to terminate the contract between both parties with immediate effect by mutual consent. Newcastle United wishes Hatem all the best for his future.” Ben Arfa joined Newcastle from Marseille in 2010, initially on loan before signing permanently the following summer despite an injury-ruined first season in England. He became a fans’ favourite after a string of spectacular goals and inspirational performances in 2012 and continued to show flashes of his best form. But his attitude and fitness came under question and he joined Hull on loan in September of this season. He made only a handful of appearances for the East Yorkshire club, failing to score and missing a glorious chance in their defeat to Tottenham, and he was substituted in the first half of the defeat to Manchester United. He returns to Ligue 1, a competition he won four times as a young player with Lyon and once more with Marseille in 2010, when he also helped the club win the Coupe de la Ligue. Nice are 11th in the table but only three points clear of the relegation zone, and will look to their new signing to spark an attack which has mustered 21 goals in 19 games this season. Ben Arfa has won 13 caps for France since his goalscoring debut against the Faroe Islands in 2007. Newcastle have released French forward Hatem Ben Arfa ahead of his move to Nice. The Ligue 1 club announced on Saturday they had reached a deal in principle with the 27-year-old, who failed to make an impact on loan at Hull this season before returning to Tyneside. Ben Arfa is due to have a medical in France on Monday before joining Nice on undisclosed terms, but will make the move as a free agent. center_img Press Associationlast_img read more