Journey through Rugby – Alex Corbisiero

first_imgOr perhaps you’d like a digital version of the magazine delivered direct to your PC, MAC or Ipad? If so click here.For Back Issues Contact John Denton Services at 01733-385-170 visit LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS The first thing my dad did on arriving in Kingston, Surrey, from America when I was five was settle me into a rugby club. I loved my time playing at KCS Old Boys. It was a great group of friends; we had a great vibe and a huge bond. I didn’t want to go out in the rain sometimes so my mum or dad had to drag me, but once there I loved it. Quick-Fire Profile…Name: Alexander CorbisieroPosition: PropAge: 22 (30 August 1988)Born: New York, USA BAGSHOT, ENGLAND – MARCH 15: Alex Corbisiero looks on during the England training session held at Pennyhill Park Hotel on March 15, 2011 in Bagshot, England. (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images) I never considered I had a chance of making a career out of rugby until that trial, but I’ve never looked back. I signed full-time with Irish after being selected for England’s U18 team.The USA played me in an U19 warm-up game, but I’d always wanted to play for England and once I had my chance in the U18 side it was confirmed.I owe a big debt to my family for the support from all of them – my mum, dad, brothers and sisters; for all they’ve done over the years, the sacrifices they’ve made for my rugby career.London Irish have been crucial to my progress; giving me chances to play but not putting too many demands on me. Guys like Neal Hatley and (England’s) Graham Rowntree have helped me massively.My story is of a player who just kept knocking on the door until it opened. People develop at different times. For me it came much later so I had to be patient.I was lucky to get my chance with England this season and to come into a side that has been playing so well. I’d been waiting for the opportunity for a while and I’d been keeping my head down, working hard and doing my analysis, until my chance came against Italy.It was daunting to play for England initially, but once I got that first scrum out of the way I was able to focus on what I had to do and settle in. With everyone around me doing their jobs so well, it made it easier for me to come into the team.I’ve thrived on the way England are playing this year. I feel privileged to have had the chance and to win the Six Nations in my first season. I have to keep pinching myself.DID YOU KNOW?Corbisiero’s great grandfather left Naples for America in the 1920s to open a restaurant called Riccardo’s. Alex’s rapping skills have seen him dubbed the ‘hip-hop prop’ and he’s studying history part-time at Birbeck College. Also, Corbisiero made his England debut against Italy, where his family originated.This article appeared in the May 2011 issue of Rugby World Magazine.Find a newsagent that sells Rugby World in the UK As a big lad I still loved touch rugby as it was a great way to pick up rugby skills. If it’d been contact at the start I might have been more inclined to try to run through people, rather than learn how to go round them. I hope it helped me avoid being a one-dimensional player. Some of the lessons I learnt all those years ago are with me today.I’ve always played at prop, though I started at tighthead so I’ve drifted between that and loosehead. At 12 we didn’t have the numbers to carry on at KCS so around eight of us moved to London Scottish, and I played two seasons of full contact.Don’t let anyone tell you that you won’t play international rugby if you don’t play age-group rugby for your country. I didn’t and still made it into the full England team.A late developer, when I was at Cobham, I didn’t even get past the first U16 trial at county level. I was also attending the International School in Cobham, which probably didn’t help as it wasn’t a big rugby school like some in the area.Those setbacks made me work harder. My dad is the sort of person who never wants to take no for an answer so he made me work harder. He’d never let me quit, and he and my mum were always there to drive me on.Sport is a great thing for a teenager to get involved in. Rugby taught me discipline, dedication and how to work with others in a team. Running around was also far better for me than sitting on my backside at home. Obviously I was quite a big kid so my parents were keen to ensure I did enough exercise!I worked hard in those late teenage years and got a lot bigger, a lot taller and started to do weights. I’d never lifted a weight until I was 16.I got noticed playing for Surrey U17 by London Welsh coach Alan Rise, so I played there up to U19, which was the first really competitive rugby I got.I moved to London Irish in my last year of school. A referee who officiated at some of my games had recommended me to them.I was lucky enough to move into their Junior Academy after a three-week summer trial. That really kicked things off for me.last_img read more

Christmas Bazaar coming this weekend

first_img LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here TAGSChristmas BazaarFirst United Methodist Church Previous articleApopka Police Department Arrest ReportNext articleThe challenge of authenticating real humans in a digital world Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom  From the First United Methodist Church of ApopkaThe First United Methodist Church Apopka Ladies are busy putting the final touches to all the creative handmade items to be sold at the annual Christmas Bazaar in the fellowship hall at the church , 201 S. Park Avenue, Apopka, FL on November 11th from 8:30 am to 3:00 p.m.  The ladies meet every Monday in the Bazaar room all day long, all year long.Some ladies work at home and bring in exquisite, one of a kind items.  Members of the church keep supplies of fabrics, ribbons, buttons, unused craft kits, etc. coming to the room.On Monday, some of the ladies were randomly asked “how they felt about the bazaar”.  Here are some of the comments: “most fun classroom I’ve been in”, “it is a mood elevator”, “I enjoy the smell and the people”, “it is better therapy than tranquilizers, you get lost in the learning”, flabbergasted that such a small group of women can put on such a show year after year”, “during the last few days, it gets very busy and people can get cranky but the Lord always pulls us through”.You can start the day off with hot apple fritters and coffee.  Lunch will be served.  This year’s theme is “The Christmas Marketplace”.  What will you find in this special store-Christmas ornaments, scarves, blankets, tree skirts, jewelry, Blue Jean aprons, Santa’s shotgun shell angels, table arrangements and wreaths to fit all your Christmas needs.The Silent Auction area will have a variety of items to bid on.  An upscale Rummage area will have everything from furniture to children’s books.  A handmade Queen/King Quilt, pillow shams and three decorative pillows, a dish garden, gift basket and gift cards will be raffled.  Tickets are $1.00 each.  All monies from raffle will go to the Methodist children’s home.Stop by and find items to get your Christmas shopping off to a good start.  For further information, call 407-889-2628 or 407-331-6972. Please enter your comment! Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Please enter your name here Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.last_img read more

Ecominds offers mental health and environment grants

first_img  67 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Funded by Big Lottery Fund’s Changing Spaces programme, Ecominds is offering grants of up to £20,000 to projects that involve people with mental health problems in benefiting their local environment. These could involve graffiti removal projects, creating or renovating urban green areas, setting up a recycling scheme, or creating a community garden.The is £1 million of funding still available, and it will be allocated by mental health charity Mind. Research by the charity has found that being outdoors and being active can be highly beneficial to everyone’s mental wellbeing.The closing date for small bids (£0 to £20,000) is 30 April 2010. Any group or organisation based in England and working on a not-for-profit basis can apply.www.ecominds.org.uk Howard Lake | 20 March 2010 | News AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Ecominds offers mental health and environment grants Tagged with: England Funding About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving.last_img read more

How small charities can apply the techniques of big campaigns

first_img  21 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9 How small charities can apply the techniques of big campaigns Presented by Madeleine Sugden and Damien Clarkson at the Third Communications Digital Communications and Social Media Convention (#nfpsm) in London on 13 June 2011. Tagged with: Digital About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Howard Lake | 18 June 2011 | Newslast_img read more

Protest murder of Palestinian baby

first_imgLocal activists held an afternoon rally across from the regional U.S. federal building in Cleveland on Aug. 7. Called by the Cleveland chapter of Al-Awda-The Palestine Right to Return Coalition, the protest called attention to the murder of 18-month-old Ali Dawabsha, whose West Bank home was firebombed by Israeli right-wing vigilantes in the middle of the night on July 31. Ali’s father, Sa’ad Dawabsheh, died on Aug. 8 from his burns.Without the huge amount of financial support from the U.S., Israel would not be able to continue the criminal occupation of Palestine.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img

Donnelly Honored by Indiana Corn and Soybean Policy Groups

first_img Donnelly Friend of FarmersJust prior to the start of the annual Purdue Ag Alumni Fish Fry at the Indiana State Fairgrounds Saturday a special award was presented for the first time.“It’s our great honor today to give our first Friend of Farmers award to Senator Joe Donnelly,” said Jane Ade Stevens, CEO of the Indiana Soybean Alliance and Indiana Corn Growers Association. Those organizations created the Friend of Farmers Award to recognize a local, state or federal public official who advocates for agriculture.Kevin Wilson of Cass County, a past president of the soybean group, said it was an honor to present the first award to the “warrior” who has stuck up for farmers in recent years. Wilson cited the Waters of the U.S. specifically.“When we have those type of issues pop up you’re supposed to be able to turn to your legislative allies and see if they can give you some help,” Wilson said. “And we turned to Senator Donnelly and he stepped right in. He stepped against his own party lines and he authored a bill to try to get that taken away for us. He was very successful and there is a lot of credit due to him because of all this.”Ronnie Mohr welcomed the senator who has supported the Indiana corn growers who grow the corn that allows for over a billion gallons of ethanol to be produced each year.“He has worked hard on the ethanol issues and that is very, very critical for rural economies all the way around, not just the ag, but jobs and everything else. I just can’t say enough about how he stands up. I got to know him a few years ago and think a lot of him. He is truly a friend of agriculture all across the United States.”Wilson also told the story of the promise Donnelly made to him to keep crop insurance secure last year.“He told us that he would go and lay down in front of President Obama’s car! He would go that far to make sure that those cuts do not take place.”Donnelly interjected that had he indeed laid down “the President would keep going!”The senator thanked the presenting farmers for the award and for providing him the wisdom he needs while serving on the Senate Ag Committee. Minor Changes in June WASDE Report Wheat ZWN21 (JUL 21) 680.75 -3.00 Live Cattle LEM21 (JUN 21) 118.70 1.13 Corn ZCN21 (JUL 21) 684.50 -14.50 Lean Hogs HEM21 (JUN 21) 122.68 0.22 SHARE Facebook Twitter All quotes are delayed snapshots How Indiana Crops are Faring Versus Other States STAY CONNECTED5,545FansLike3,961FollowersFollow187SubscribersSubscribe By Andy Eubank – Feb 8, 2016 Donnelly Honored by Indiana Corn and Soybean Policy Groups Feeder Cattle GFQ21 (AUG 21) 151.18 2.78 Facebook Twitter Name Sym Last Change Home Indiana Agriculture News Donnelly Honored by Indiana Corn and Soybean Policy Groups Previous articleDonnelly Optimistic on Ag Issues in SenateNext articleMorning Outlook Andy Eubank RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Soybean ZSN21 (JUL 21) 1508.50 -35.50 SHARE Battle Resistance With the Soy Checkoff ‘Take Action’ Program last_img read more

Commentary: Governor Holcomb and Indiana Corn Farmers Face a Kobayashi Maru

first_imgHome Commentary Commentary: Governor Holcomb and Indiana Corn Farmers Face a Kobayashi Maru SHARE Facebook Twitter Facebook Twitter Commentary: Governor Holcomb and Indiana Corn Farmers Face a Kobayashi Maru The Kobayashi Maru is a training exercise in the fictional Star Trek universe designed to test the character of Starfleet Academy cadets in a no-win scenario. Indiana Senate Bill 303 puts Indiana corn farmers in such a no-win scenario. The bill, passed this session by the Indiana General Assembly, would require a new label on all pumps that dispense e-15. That could potentially confuse motorists with a bunch of unnecessary warnings.  The bill now sits on the Governor’s desk waiting for him to sign or veto. For Holcomb, what makes this a no-win is that the ethanol industry wants him to veto the bill while some fuel retailers and the powerful ag lobby, including Indiana Farm Bureau, are urging him to sign it.Indiana’s ethanol laws need to be updated. We still have laws on the books that referred to the fuel as “gasohol”.  The legislation started out to make the changes needed to bring Indiana up to the modern era and increase the sale of the renewable fuel with 15% blend of corn-based ethanol.  Along the way, amendments were added by lawmakers to protect consumers.  These uninformed legislators failed to understand that ethanol does not pose a danger to motorists and is not a source of concern by most drivers.Motorists have been filling up with fuel made up of 10% ethanol for over a decade. The increase to a 15% blend, approved by the EPA, requires no change in their fueling habits and has been proven to pose no problem for nearly all cars on the road today.  Thus, the ethanol industry argues that a warning label is unnecessary since the EPA has already approved a label for use with the sale of e-15 fuel. Yet, the Indiana General Assembly, which often places politics above sense, refused to pass the bill without the new label requirement.The Indiana ag lobby wants to see the bill signed into law, even though it is not to their liking.  The ethanol producers want the bill trashed and, perhaps, to try again next session. Meanwhile, Indiana corn farmers, heading to the field to plant another crop, are stuck in the middle.Whatever the Governor decides, corn farmers will see an impact on the demand for corn in Indiana. Ethanol accounts for over 40% of the corn demand in our state.  Ethanol refiners say, if the bill becomes law, less ethanol will be needed. Fuel retailers say, without the bill, they will not be able to sell e-15, thus reducing the demand for ethanol.Politically, the Governor is facing a Kobayashi Maru. Either way he alienates a key agricultural constituency. Signing the bill may be the politically expedient move. Yet, signing a bill you know is bad policy is never the right thing to do.Lawmakers need to wake up to the fact that motorists are not worried about ethanol. Price is on their minds when they pull up to the pump; and e-15 will cost less. Consumers are also worried about the environment; and increasing the level of ethanol in our fuel supply will reduce greenhouse gasses and help combat climate change. Research has shown that, when these facts are presented to the public, they quickly become ethanol supporters.In the Star Trek series, the only person to beat the Kobayashi Maru test was James T. Kirk. He did this by reprograming the computer to give him a third choice that was a win. Unfortunately, Governor Holcomb does not have this option and neither do Indiana corn famers. Both sides claim that, whether Senate Bill 303 is signed or vetoed, ethanol use in Indiana will be impacted. Indiana corn farmers will have to wait and see what happens and figure out how to “live long and prosper.” SHARE By Gary Truitt – Apr 19, 2021 Previous articleFCC App Helps Find Rural Broadband Coverage GapsNext articleFarm Bureau Encouraging Farmers to Get Involved in Their Community Gary Truittlast_img read more

U.S. Rep. Duffy Says Financial Reform Attempts Have Failed America

first_img Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Sean DuffyA U.S. Congressman said on Wednesday that the government’s attempts at financial reform, namely the Dodd-Frank Act passed in 2010, have missed the mark as the “unintended consequences” and “collateral damage” have outweighed the positives of reform attempts.In an editorial for the Marshfield (Wisconsin) News Herald, U.S. Rep. Sean Duffy (R-Wisconsin) on Wednesday, Chairman of the House Committee on Financial Services’ Subcommittee on Financial Services Oversight and Investigations, stated that as Dodd-Frank has been implemented over the last five years, “clearly, older does not mean wiser.”Duffy said in Wednesday’s editorial at the time Dodd-Frank was passed in July 2010, President Obama promised it would “lift the economy,” stabilize markets, protect Americans’ hard-earned money, and end “too big to fail” to ensure that the failure of any one financial institution would threaten the stability of the global economy.”Instead, for most Americans, the costs of doing business went up, while benefits went down,” Duffy said. “Mortgages were harder to qualify for. Gone were the days of free checking, and when it game to getting that loan to open the small business of your American dream, your word was no longer as good as your bond.”The 2008 financial crisis occurred largely because of a combination of federal financial regulators failed to do their jobs and failure to anticipate problems in the subprime mortgages market, Duffy said.”Instead, for most Americans, the costs of doing business went up, while benefits went down.””It rewarded regulators’ incompetence with more responsibility, and it built a moat around ‘too big to fail institutions,’ while making it difficult for small banks to stay afloat—to say nothing of the untold damage it has done to our economy,” Duffy said. “The law of unintended consequences has never been more apparent than when we look at Dodd-Frank.”Duffy said that while Dodd-Frank’s goal may be worthy, “we must look at the collateral damage along the way and ask ourselves if we are going down the right path.” In particular, the new regulatory environment has placed heavy burdens on community banks and smaller financial institutions; and while banks may be better capitalized, they are pulling out of market-making activities. For example, in July, Wells Fargo and Prospect Mortgage announced their departure from marketing activities that depend on mortgage servicing agreements due to regulatory uncertainty and Real Estate Settlement Procedures Act (RESPA) interpretations. With banks holding onto more capital and withdrawing from market-making activities, “these markets are left withering in the wake of Dodd-Frank and other internal regulations,” Duffy said.The controversial Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), which was created by Dodd-Frank, was tasked with protecting consumers of financial products from predatory practices, according to Duffy, yet ironically the Bureau has come under heavy scrutiny for allegations that it discriminated against employees and subsequently retaliated against the whistleblowers.In March, Duffy introduced a comprehensive package to reform the CFPB. In April, a Duffy-sponsored bill (H.R. 1265, or the Bureau Advisory Commission Transparency Act) calling for more transparency from the Bureau passed in the House by a 401 to 2 vote.”This ‘government-knows-best’ mentality has gone too far,” Duffy said. “Americans are capable of making financial decisions that they know to be in their best interests. The CFPB is putting its political ideology over your consumer freedom.” About Author: Brian Honea Previous: Prominent Economists Contend Now Is Not the Time for a Fed Lift-Off Next: Comptroller of the Currency Discusses Progress Made Toward Rehabilitating Urban Communities Sign up for DS News Daily  Print This Post Share Save U.S. Rep. Duffy Says Financial Reform Attempts Have Failed America Brian Honea’s writing and editing career spans nearly two decades across many forms of media. He served as sports editor for two suburban newspaper chains in the DFW area and has freelanced for such publications as the Yahoo! Contributor Network, Dallas Home Improvement magazine, and the Dallas Morning News. He has written four non-fiction sports books, the latest of which, The Life of Coach Chuck Curtis, was published by the TCU Press in December 2014. A lifelong Texan, Brian received his master’s degree from Amberton University in Garland. The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days agocenter_img in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, News Subscribe Home / Daily Dose / U.S. Rep. Duffy Says Financial Reform Attempts Have Failed America Tagged with: CFPB Congressman Sean Duffy Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Related Articles The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago CFPB Congressman Sean Duffy Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform 2015-09-09 Brian Honea September 9, 2015 1,023 Views Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days agolast_img read more

Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth

first_img default Economy Equity HOUSING Underwater 2019-07-18 Seth Welborn  Print This Post Tagged with: default Economy Equity HOUSING Underwater Share Save Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Sign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Homeownership Rates Missing the Mark Next: Reforming Fannie and Freddie The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago A new report from CoreLogic examines how housing has played a part in what is now the longest economic expansion on record. According to a CoreLogic special report, titled “The Role of Housing in the Longest Economic Expansion,” in July 2019,  the United States’ economic expansion reached 121 months. The economy has continued to grow since the recession ended in 2009, and with housing comprising approximately 15% of GDP since 2010, the real estate market is an important indicator of economic health.“During the last nine years, the expansion has created more than 20 million jobs, raised family incomes and rebuilt consumer confidence,” said CoreLogic Chief Economist Frank Nothaft. “The longest stretch of mortgage rates below 5% in more than 60 years has supplemented these factors. These economic forces have driven a recovery in home sales, construction, prices and home equity wealth.”In Q1 2019, the total percent of homes underwater went from 25.9% in the first quarter of 2010 to 4.1% in the first quarter of 2019. Meanwhile, home equity reached $15.8 trillion up from $6.1 trillion in 2019. Additionally, CoreLogic notes that home flipping has increased significantly since the recession, reaching its highest point 11.4% in 2018. The number of homes underwater dropped by over 21 percentage points to 4.1% in the first quarter of 2019, while the biggest drop (6.2%) occurred between 2012 and 2013 when the share of homes with negative equity went from 22.4% to 15.5%, driven in part by  a 10.2% rise in home prices. “Home prices have increased steadily since 2011, creating record amountsof home equity and putting homeowners in a good position to weather future downturns,” said Molly Boesel, Principal Economist, CoreLogic.According to CoreLogic, concerns over an imminent recession have been rising as the economy continues to progress. In the housing economy, while home prices are still growing, they aredoing so at a slower pace. Home prices increased just 3.6% year over year in May 2019, down from 4.1% in January. Additionally, housing starts in May 2019 underperformed, dropping 0.9% below the revised April estimate. “We expect the housing market to enter a normalcy phase over the next 24 months,” said Ralph McLaughlin, Deputy Chief Economist. “With prices neither rising too fast nor too slow, and with a growing stream of young households looking to buy homes over the next two decades, the long-term view looks healthy.” in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agocenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago July 18, 2019 1,260 Views About Author: Seth Welborn Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth Subscribelast_img read more

Mama Scott’s abolitionist teaching lives on at Juneteenth Festival

first_img Devon Magliozzi is a reporter for the Ithaca Voice. Questions? Story tips? Contact her at [email protected] or 607-391-0328. More by Devon Magliozzi Your Arts & Culture news is made possible with support from: Devon Magliozzi Tagged: abolitionism, festival, jacqueline melton scott, juneteenth, southside community center ITHACA, N.Y. — “Mama Scott said live simply, Mama Scott said care deeply, Mama Scott said speak kindly, and live out loud,” a chorus of Southside Community Center youth performers sang at the 2019 Southside Juneteenth Festival, which was dedicated to longtime Ithaca teacher and activist Jacqueline Elizabeth Melton Scott.Scott, who passed away at the age of 82 in March, spent her life teaching about the historical and present conditions that create race, class and gender injustice, while uplifting the contributions of black people in Ithaca and beyond. She was remembered at Saturday’s celebration as someone who struggled tirelessly to make Ithaca a more inclusive and equitable community.“The best way we can celebrate her is to keep up the struggle,” said Margaret Washington, professor of history at Cornell University and a close friend of Scott’s.Washington said Scott was distressed by some recent changes in the Southside neighborhood where she was born and raised and returned as an adult in the 1990s, after a period in Cambridge during which she established a Montessori school. She was distressed, Washington said, by gentrification – by longtime residents priced out of their homes and replaced by newcomers who, in some cases, tried to change the neighborhood rather than becoming part of it.“She would raise her voice tremendously about that,” Washington said, because she believed in the neighborhood and the city.Courtesy of Southside Community Center.Over her years in Ithaca, Scott went from being a youngster at the Southside Community Center to a teen supervising kids there to the adult at its helm, serving as director during the ’90s. She was a fixture at the center right until the end of her life. A photo featured on the 2019 Juneteenth program shows Scott seated in what Nia Nunn, president of the Southside board and assistant professor of education at Ithaca College, called the “Black Panther” chair from which she read stories to kids. Preaching black girl empowerment until the end, at her last Southside story time Scott read “I Am Enough”: “I know that we don’t look the same, our skin our eyes our hair our frame. But that does not dictate our worth. We both have places here on Earth. And in the end we are right here, to live a life of love, not fear.”Related: Southside Community Center celebrates 85 years of empowering black girlsThe theme of the 2019 Juneteenth Festival was abolitionist teaching, which Nunn said Scott embodied not only as a teacher at Beverly J. Martin and program leader at Southside but in everything she did.“It’s the type of learning experiences that liberate you,” Nunn said, “that’s what Mama Scott did.”Juneteenth is a celebration of the abolition of slavery in the United States, commemorating the day slaves in Texas learned they were free: June 19, 1865. That date is more than two years after abolition became the law of the land. “The truth is that two and a half years earlier, the Emancipation Proclamation had already been issued (January 1, 1863), but this information was withheld. It’s a celebration to honor the celebratory response from many Black people after discovering the truth about their freedom,” the event program reads.Recounting trips with Scott to historic sites along the Underground Railroad, Washington honored the history of black people who fought to end slavery and secure their freedom. But Scott, she said, never treated abolition as a historical fact. Scott saw abolition as a long process, one that meant abolishing prisons and ICE and anything meant to suppress groups in our society.“Abolishing privilege,” Washington said, was Scott’s life work.Phoebe Brown, regional coordinator of the Alliance of Families for Justice, stepped into the role Scott long played by opening Saturday’s festivities with a libation, a ritual meant to awaken ancestors and bless those gathered, and then with the audience called out the names of ancestors: her mother, Harriet Tubman, Nat Turner, Malcolm X, Billie Holiday, Nina Simone, and Jacqueline Elizabeth Melton Scott.Featured image: Youth performers from the Southside Community Center sing a tribute to Jackie Melton Scott. (Devon Magliozzi/Ithaca Voice) last_img read more