A second Troy is the burning ambition for film industry

first_imgIs Aer Lingus taking flight from Shannon? WhatsApp TAGSfilmLimerick City and CountyNewsTroyTroy Studios Shannon Airport braced for a devastating blow Local backlash over Aer Lingus threat RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TechPost | Episode 9 | Pay with Google, WAZE – the new Google Maps? and Speak don’t Type! Facebook Limerick on Covid watch list Previous articleWATCH: John Kiely on the importance of improving year on yearNext articleHigh flying Munsters welcome leaders Con to Greenfields Bernie Englishhttp://www.limerickpost.ieBernie English has been working as a journalist in national and local media for more than thirty years. She worked as a staff journalist with the Irish Press and Evening Press before moving to Clare. She has worked as a freelance for all of the national newspaper titles and a staff journalist in Limerick, helping to launch the Limerick edition of The Evening Echo. Bernie was involved in the launch of The Clare People where she was responsible for business and industry news. center_img Advertisement Email Linkedin Twitter Housing 37 Compulsory Purchase Orders issued as council takes action on derelict sites Print A SECOND Troy studio is on the cards for Limerick, such is the success of the film production site at the former Dell computer factory in Castletroy.Members of Limerick City and County Council’s Economic Development Enterprise and Planning Committee have been told that the success achieved by Troy has sparked the search for another premises to start a second studio.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up Innovate Limerick chief executive David Cantwell said that an important part of his organisation’s work is to make the Mid West a more attractive location for film production.“Troy is a success story and we have been working with Screen Ireland and Screen Training Ireland to develop the sector. There’s up to €500 million in film project funding floating around looking for somewhere to get started.”Mr Cantwell said they are currently seeking suitable premises and while Limerick is a likely location it could also go to the county or other big Mid West towns.Either way, he said there would be Limerick jobs created, and “well-paid jobs” at that.“It doesn’t have to have as a big a floor space as Troy but it does need height and that is very important. It could well be a smaller concern able to accommodate some of the lower budget productions.“Troy is aimed at the big-ticket productions for Netflix and the like but they tend to stay a few months and then leave, taking their skills with them.“If we had smaller productions rolling over the whole time, it would be an enormous advantage in training people in the skill sets they need for the industry.Other projects that Innovate is currently involved in include developing an ehub in Abbeyfeale and helping to develop the Kilmallock business park.The company has also acquired the former social welfare building in Limerick City and Theatre Royal to facilitate expansion and establishment of the Digital Collaboration Centre.Responding to Cllr Stephan Kearey (FG), who asked whether Limerick has the necessary skill sets to fill those additional jobs, Mr Cantwell said it is a “new industry and we are somewhat reliant on attracting outside skills.“But there is a lot of work being done on films in particular and at third level. We are now establishing the Mid West Film Eduction and Training group.”“There are 450 people working n Troy right now and there’s a good representation of local people working there, particularly on sets.”Mr Cantwell added that it was the industry itself which was saying that there is a requirement for another facility.Cllr Bridie Collins (FF) said the further growth of a film industry in the Mid West “could be used as an argument for support for Shannon airport.“If Limerick is becoming a hub for film investment – they seem to tie up,” she said. NewsBusinessLocal NewsPoliticsA second Troy is the burning ambition for film industryBy Bernie English – December 12, 2019 256 last_img read more

Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth

first_img default Economy Equity HOUSING Underwater 2019-07-18 Seth Welborn  Print This Post Tagged with: default Economy Equity HOUSING Underwater Share Save Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Sign up for DS News Daily Home / Daily Dose / Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago Previous: Homeownership Rates Missing the Mark Next: Reforming Fannie and Freddie The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago A new report from CoreLogic examines how housing has played a part in what is now the longest economic expansion on record. According to a CoreLogic special report, titled “The Role of Housing in the Longest Economic Expansion,” in July 2019,  the United States’ economic expansion reached 121 months. The economy has continued to grow since the recession ended in 2009, and with housing comprising approximately 15% of GDP since 2010, the real estate market is an important indicator of economic health.“During the last nine years, the expansion has created more than 20 million jobs, raised family incomes and rebuilt consumer confidence,” said CoreLogic Chief Economist Frank Nothaft. “The longest stretch of mortgage rates below 5% in more than 60 years has supplemented these factors. These economic forces have driven a recovery in home sales, construction, prices and home equity wealth.”In Q1 2019, the total percent of homes underwater went from 25.9% in the first quarter of 2010 to 4.1% in the first quarter of 2019. Meanwhile, home equity reached $15.8 trillion up from $6.1 trillion in 2019. Additionally, CoreLogic notes that home flipping has increased significantly since the recession, reaching its highest point 11.4% in 2018. The number of homes underwater dropped by over 21 percentage points to 4.1% in the first quarter of 2019, while the biggest drop (6.2%) occurred between 2012 and 2013 when the share of homes with negative equity went from 22.4% to 15.5%, driven in part by  a 10.2% rise in home prices. “Home prices have increased steadily since 2011, creating record amountsof home equity and putting homeowners in a good position to weather future downturns,” said Molly Boesel, Principal Economist, CoreLogic.According to CoreLogic, concerns over an imminent recession have been rising as the economy continues to progress. In the housing economy, while home prices are still growing, they aredoing so at a slower pace. Home prices increased just 3.6% year over year in May 2019, down from 4.1% in January. Additionally, housing starts in May 2019 underperformed, dropping 0.9% below the revised April estimate. “We expect the housing market to enter a normalcy phase over the next 24 months,” said Ralph McLaughlin, Deputy Chief Economist. “With prices neither rising too fast nor too slow, and with a growing stream of young households looking to buy homes over the next two decades, the long-term view looks healthy.” in Daily Dose, Featured, Government, Market Studies, News Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days agocenter_img The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago July 18, 2019 1,260 Views About Author: Seth Welborn Related Articles Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Housing’s Impact on Economic Growth Subscribelast_img read more