#BREAKING River searches to resume for man in his 30s

first_imgLinkedin Print Email WhatsApp Facebook Twittercenter_img Fireswift, The Limerick City Fire and Rescue boatAndrew [email protected] up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up SEARCHES are to resume for a male who was seen entering the water at the River Shannon during the early hours of this Monday morning.The alarm was raised shortly after 01:45 when Limerick City and County Fire and Rescue Service were alerted to a report of a male in his early 30’s seen entering the water at Thomond Bridge.Theee units of the service attended the scene.Within 4 minutes of receiving the call, The Fire Service launched their Rescue Boat – “FireSwift” with 3 Swiftwater Rescue Technicans on board.Limerick Marine Search and Rescue members were also on scene to carry out searches.An extensive search was launched involving all responders including Fire Service SRT ground crews, Gardai, Paramedics and Coast Guard including the Shannon based R115 Helicopter and Limerick Marine Search and Rescue which lasted over two hours, however the person was not located.Searches will recommence this Monday morning. Advertisement NewsBreaking news#BREAKING River searches to resume for man in his 30sBy Staff Reporter – January 25, 2016 632 Previous articleChallenging times for international class Limerick Jazz SocNext articleGAA – CLUB Limerick Draw 2016 is up and running Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ielast_img read more

Corpus warns students of mumps outbreak

first_imgCorpus Christi has issued an email warning students of a mumps outbreak amongst the student population. It also notes that “Mumps is usually a self-limitingcondition. It will usually resolve over 1–2 weeks, with no long-termconsequences and antibiotic treatment is not required.” The email quotes the diagnosis of mumps from the NHS website as follows: “Mumps is a contagious viral infection.  It is most recognisable by the painful swellings at the side of the face under the ears (the parotid glands), giving a person with mumps a distinctive “hamster face” appearance.  “Rest, drink adequate fluids, and takeparacetamol or ibuprofen for symptomatic relief. “Other symptomsof mumps include headaches, joint pain and a high temperature, which maydevelop a few days before the swelling of the parotid glands.” “Apply warm or cold packs to the parotid gland asit may ease discomfort.  In an email addressed to “all students and tutors”, Corpus Christi’s Welfare Dean and College Nurse wrote that: “A number of students have been diagnosed with mumps so we thought it important to send out a message advising students what they need to look out for and what to do if they think they have mumps and advising tutors that mumps is circulating amongst the student body.”center_img “Do not attend tutorials, lectures or interact with other students for 5 days after the initial development of parotitis (inflammation of a parotid gland).  If you are able to go home it would be advisable to do so.” Oxford was previously affected by a mumps outbreak at University College in October 2018. Corpus Christi College has been contacted forcomment. The email further advisesstudents to “See the College Doctor (but informthe receptionist that you think you have mumps so they are aware prior to yourarrival at the surgery) or contact the College Nurse. If you are worried that you might have contracted mumps contact your GP for advice.last_img read more

Avian flu could cost Asia $130 billion

first_imgDec 3, 2004 (CIDRAP News) – Avian influenza is expected to cost Asia $130 billion by 2005, according to Hur Young-joo of the South Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare, as reported in the Dec 2 online edition of The Korea Times.Of that $130 billion, $60 billion has been spent in China since 2003, Hur said. The estimate was attributed to Oxford Economic Forecasting Ltd., a United Kingdom firm that provides economic analysis, forecasting, and models for businesses. Information about which Asian countries were included and how the figure was developed was not available.Hur’s remarks came in advance of an international conference on zoonoses, which began today in Seoul, South Korea.About 170 experts were expected to participate, including representatives from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, the World Health Organization, and the World Organization for Animal Health, the newspaper reported.An official from South Korea’s Ministry of Health and Welfare was quoted as saying, “We seek to prepare a global network for efficient cooperation against epidemics in order to minimize damages from the diseases.”Zoonotic diseases are an area of growing concern for a number of reasons, but avian influenza in Asia has been dominating the news. Experts increasingly worry that the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian flu, which has killed 32 people in Vietnam and Thailand this year, could trigger a human flu pandemic.South Korea hasn’t had avian flu since March, but officials have strengthened quarantine measures in the country and designated the November-to-February period as a time to be on special alert for the disease, the paper reported.last_img read more