Janelle Monáe Releases Bob Marley Cover For ‘Spotify Singles’ Series [Listen]

first_imgJanelle Monáe is the latest pop artist to stop by the Spotify studios to perform some music for the streaming platform’s Spotify Singles series. The well-known singer and songwriter has kept a busy schedule full of similar appearances over the past year in promotion of her 2018 Dirty Computer studio album. For her turn on the audio streaming series, Monáe performed “I Like That” from her album, in addition to providing a spin on Bob Marley & The Wailer‘s “High Tide or Low Tide” from the reggae band’s 1973 album, Catch A Fire.Monáe’s new version of the reggae classic sticks pretty close to the original, although hers does shine a little clearer thanks to the modern recording technology used to capture what is a flawless performance. Her voice can be heard standing firmly above the held-out chords of an organ while she sings Marley’s love-soaked lyrics, “In high seas or in low seas/I’m gonna be your friend/In high tide or in low tide/I’ll be by your side.” Fans can have fun comparing her sparkling new version of the Bob Marley deep cut with his original recording heard below.Bob Marley & The Wailers – “High Tide or Low Tide”[Video: TheBognekRasta]Janelle Monáe wrapped up her busy world tour schedule in support of Dirty Computer back in September, following notable performances at big events including New York’s philanthropic Global Citizen Festival, Philadelphia’s Made in America Fest, Florida’s Suwanee Hulaween, and Austin City Limits Festival. Monáe had also shared a 46-minute sci-fi/fantasy narrative film to go with her album upon its release back in late April, which has also be lauded as nothing short of a “masterpiece,” according to Rolling Stone.The acting side of Monáe’s career also continues to thrive, as the next feature film she’s set to appear in titled Welcome to Marwen is scheduled to arrive on December 21st, and co-stars Steve Carell, Leslie Mann and Diane Kruger. Monáe will also appear in Disney’s live-action remake of its 1955 classic animated film, Lady and the Tramp.<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>[H/T Consequence of Sound]last_img read more

Prof. travels to Iraq to teach

first_imgA Notre Dame political science professor had the unique opportunity last month to teach students about “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness” in a place where such terms are foreign and difficult to grasp.Professor Vincent Muñoz traveled to the American University of Iraq-Sulaimani (AUI-S) to teach students about the principles behind the United States Constitution and Declaration of Independence.“The ideas were new and not familiar. They really wanted to know what it means to have the right to life, the right to liberty,” Muñoz said. AUI-S, a private university, opened in 2007 and offers an American-style liberal arts education. All classes are taught in English.Muñoz met AUI-S Provost John Agresto last November after the Notre Dame professor gave a lecture about the Constitution in Philadelphia. Agresto later invited Muñoz to teach students about American democracy in a workshop setting at AUI-S.Muñoz left for Iraq on March 25 and returned on April 5, traveling 30 hours each way. Notre Dame’s Institute for Scholarship in the Liberal Arts (ISLA) funded the trip.“I definitely want to thank Agustin Fuentes, director of the ISLA,” Muñoz said.On a typical day, Muñoz did some of his own work in the morning, ate lunch with faculty in the afternoon, met with his class and held informal conversations with students after class.“I taught for five days, but the total trip was 10 days,” Muñoz said. “I taught a 75 minute class which tended to go to 90 minutes. Anyone could come, and more students came every day.”Muñoz said the students arrived at each seminar class well prepared and with many questions.“The first day we did the Declaration of Independence and [discussed] what the purpose of government is. The second day we did the Federalist Number 10. [We then] spent two days on religious freedom and one day on constitutional design,” Muñoz said. “Students were so engaged because Iraq just wrote a constitution.”Muñoz said most students looked to America as the ideal democratic society.“[We discussed that] liberal democracy has its advantages and disadvantages,” he said. “They are so enamored with the idea of democracy, to have someone talk about the disadvantages of democracy was new to them.”Muñoz said some female students worried about the abuses of freedom. These students were concerned too much freedom could lead to an increased prevalence of abortions and pornography.Toward the end of his stay in Iraq, Muñoz gave a lecture open to the entire university titled “Constitutional Democracy and Religious Freedom.”“In the lecture I did a comparison between the Iraqi and American constitutions,” Muñoz said. “Islam is the established religion in the Iraqi constitution. I compared that to how we don’t have an official religion in America. Students thought it would be impossible not to have an established religion [In Iraq].”Muñoz said students were surprised a separation of church and state is not considered anti-religious. They also struggled to comprehend the idea of a limited government.“They had not seen the arguments for these ideas before,” Muñoz said.Muñoz said his class felt “in many ways, just like a seminar at Notre Dame.”But he said teaching students who are so unfamiliar with concepts like freedom of speech and freedom of religion — concepts most Americans do not think twice about — was refreshing.“[The trip] reminded me why I love to teach these things, because the students were so hungry to learn and the ideas were so new to them,” Muñoz said. “The eagerness of the students was infectious — they desire so much to live as a stable democracy like America.”last_img read more

Broward Board Wants All Students on Campus at Least Twice Weekly

first_imgMorris hopes the district re-open schools “and scrap distance learning. You failed my children.”Several board members agreed with the need for better online offerings.“I don’t think it can be a free-for-all where in many cases, kids were on their own,” Board member Laurie Rich Levinson said. “It’s important our kids be educated every single day.”School district officials offered several options for reducing the number of students and promoting social distancing.However, board members now believe the best option is for all students to attend at least two days a week.One option would have some students attend Mondays and Tuesdays, and others on Thursday and Friday, with cleaning and disinfecting occurring on Wednesday.Other School Board members believe schools should be open to students every day, with cleaning and disinfecting taking place on nights and weekends.On the other hand, board member Donna Korn suggests a compromise in which schools could be open a half-day to students Wednesday, with the other half to be used for cleaning and teacher planning and professional development.School district officials plan to further discuss the options throughout the summer. The plans could also depend on how severe the coronavirus is in Broward County at the beginning of the school year.UPDATED: School Systems Consider Twice-a-Week School, Other Options for Fall Students in Broward would return to campus two to three days a week this fall, with improved at-home education offered on the remaining days, according to a proposal that School Board members outlined this week.The plan, is under development, attempts to balance the preferences of parents and students.All of the board members said they wanted students on campus as much, and as safely as possible, when the school year starts Aug. 19.However, parents and students are divided on the matter. A recent survey found that a third of parents and students prefer a full-time return to school, while another third want a hybrid online and in-person experience. A quarter of them want education to stay online, and the rest were unsure.Many parents and students have criticized the online instruction that was offered during the spring, as lockdowns went into effect due to the pandemic.They said teachers put course materials and assignments online and often did not cover the material or have contact with students.“Your lack of assigning appropriate teachers to provide online instruction is negligence,” Parkland parent Tammy Morris told the School Board. “I am now spending the summer teaching my children the appropriate math and English lessons they did not receive. I am not a teacher; I am a mother.”last_img read more