Shannon Chamber launches new Lean Network

first_imgAdvertisement Enterprise Ireland CEO Julie Sinnamon to join Shannon Chamber Webinar to share advice for companies as they embrace the recovery Email BusinessNewsShannon Chamber launches new Lean NetworkBy Staff Reporter – November 9, 2016 1991 Facebook Shannon Companies Sharing Data on their Preparedness for COVID-19 Shannon training programmes go virtual Quality, Reliability and Cost Rank High in Assessment of Sup-Suppliers by Multinational and Larger Indigenous Companies WhatsApp Twittercenter_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Print Chamber members hoping for good news on jobs front Launching the new Mid-West Lean Network (from left): Gene Leonard, managing director, LBSPartners; Helen Downes, chief executive, Shannon Chamber; Alan Keogh, plant manager and Neil Enright, GLSS site development leader, Molex Shannon. Photo: Eamon Ward.A NEW business network, aimed at encouraging companies to adopt Lean practices, has been set up for the Mid West region.The brainchild of Shannon Chamber, the Mid-West Lean Network, will be managed by Shannon Chamber, chaired in the first instance by Molex Shannon and directed by LBS Partners. The network is open to businesses across all sectors who wish to learn about and introduce Lean into their organisations.Inaugural network chairman, Neil Enright, GLSS site development leader with Molex stated: “The purpose of the new network is to strengthen and increase an existing culture of Lean within the Shannon and the wider Mid-West region to enable each industry to broaden and strengthen their competitiveness through knowledge sharing and benchmarking against each other and different industries.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “We see this as a key enabler to attract new investment and job growth within the region by making each member more cost effective and better service providers by creating long-term value for their customers.“Through collaboration with our academic partner, the University of Limerick, we will work to ensure that a pipeline of relevant programmes is available to help strengthen the requisite skill sets. We will also work with government agencies like IDA and Enterprise Ireland to ensure that our members are aware of and can avail of the funding and support available through these agencies’ Lean programmes.”Speaking at the launch, Shannon Chamber’s chief executive Helen Downes said: “We have been hosting annual Lean in Business seminars since 2011. Their popularity stems from the fact that they give companies the opportunity to see first-hand how Lean works and the benefits that can be derived from becoming Lean.“We looked at the success of a number of Forums we have already established – the CEO and HR Forums in particular – and thought, why not a Lean network along the same lines. The buy-in has been tremendous and I am delighted that Molex’s Neil Enright has agreed to be the first chair, ably assisted by the Shannon Chamber team and, Gene Leonard and Michelle Whelan from LBS Partners.“Based on a poll of 13 topics presented at the launch, a roster of Lean topics will be chosen for a series of monthly Lean workshops, which will commence in January 2017. A number of companies have already volunteered to host some of these workshops in their facilities, which is an amazing buy-in already. As evidenced from the presentations at the Lean seminar, the benefits from introducing Lean are quite staggering and we look forward to witnessing an increased robustness in enterprises gained from adopting Lean.”Contact [email protected] to register interest and membership is free. Linkedin Previous articleSoccer – Janesboro and Moyross clash set for TVNext articleSoccer – FAI unveil new Football Development Officer for Limerick Staff Reporterhttp://www.limerickpost.ie TAGSLean NetworkShannon Chamber Shannon Chamber Webinar to help people cope with the stresses of COVID-19 last_img read more

Dining halls seek to decrease waste

first_imgThe semi-annual Waste-Free Wednesdays campaign, which took place during April, aimed to decrease the food and liquid waste produced at Notre Dame. Campaign co-chair Anna Gorman said the project seeks to educate students about the number of Americans who struggles to put food on the table. “One in six Americans struggle with hunger, and the statistic is even higher for children,” she said. “We waste roughly enough food in our country to provide food for all those who are hungry.” Each Wednesday in April from 6 to 7 p.m., volunteers handed out raffle tickets to students who cleared their trays at the dining halls. The winner of the raffle is awarded 100 Flex Points. Gorman said the campaign, which is co-sponsored by the Office of Sustainability, Notre Dame Food Services, GreeND and the Hunger Coalition, had a total of about 1,200 participants in the past four weeks. Prior to the start of the Waste- Free Wednesdays campaign in 2008, the average student wasted about five ounces of food per meal, adding up to nearly two tons of food wasted each day. By the end of the fall 2012 semester, the waste dropped to 3.26 ounces per meal, Gorman said. This semester, Gorman said the waste is slightly higher, with an average of 3.5 ounces per student, but it has still drastically decreased compared to the 2008 statistics. The Office of Sustainability has also contributed to reducing waste by posting educational posters in the dining halls to encourage students and faculty to only take what they can finish. According to the office’ website, “Food scraps from the main Food Service facility are used for cattle feed, totaling about 37,000 pounds per year. Leftover cooked food is donated to two local homeless shelters.” Gorman is similarly concerned about the impact of food waste to the environment. “We are forcing our farms to produce more than we need, hurting our land. In addition, food waste produces methane, a potent greenhouse gas,” Gorman said. With the combined efforts of the co-sponsors of Waste-Free Wednesdays, Gorman said the University can provide more food to the needy, answer a social responsibility and avoid putting unnecessary strains on the environment. The challenge is letting people know they can easily have a large impact on hunger, Gorman said. “Waste-Free Wednesdays could be more effective if we were better able to educate students,” she said.last_img read more

5 ways to make your MSR’s more productive

first_imgMember Service Representatives are not only the face of your credit union, but they are the lifeline to smooth front-end operations. If your CU is trying to evolve and grow, then it’s imperative to consider ways to increase the productivity of your employees, without wearing them out with more responsibility than they can handle. Here are 5 ideas you can implement at your CU to make your MSR’s more productive in their daily work:Create an environment that makes work enjoyable. You want your team to treat members with friendly attitudes, patience and understanding. You also expect staff to inform members of additional services that can improve their experience at the CU. To create that environment, you need to extend your MSRs the same courtesies and development opportunities. If MSRs feel that work is rewarding, and enjoy serving and solving member problems, the better they will be at it. Happy employees mean happy members.Encourage proper etiquette. In our article 6 Things MSR’s Should Remind Themselves of Daily we discuss how language and posture earn trust.  Scientific studies confirm that body language is all-important when it comes to making first impressions, forming new relationships, and maintaining existing relationships. The 7%-38%-55% rule, postulated by psychologist Albert Mehrabian, points to three elements that inform first impressions and earn trust: Words are 7% of the message, tone of voice is 38%, and body language is 55%. Remind MSRs that, while what they say is important, 93% of their interactions are perceived by tone, attitude, and nonverbal cues. Their attitude can make or break the member/CU bond. If the members come out with a positive feeling about their interaction, they’re more likely to encourage others to join. continue reading » 7SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more