Transition author Tope Folarin wins 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing

first_imgPrevious winners are Leila Aboulela (2000), Helon Habila (2001), Binyavanga Wainaina (2002), Yvonne Owuor (2003), Brian Chikwava (2004), Segun Afolabi (2005), Mary Watson (2006), Monica Arac de Nyeko (2007), Henrietta Rose-Innes (2008), EC Osondu (2009), Olufemi Terry (2010), NoViolet Bulawayo (2011) and Rotimi Babatunde (2012). Nigeria’s Tope Folarin has won the 2013 Caine Prize for African Writing, described as Africa’s leading literary award, for his short story entitled ‘Miracle’ from Transition, Issue 109 (Bloomington, 2012). Transition is a publication of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute at Harvard University. Read Full Storycenter_img The chair of judges, Gus Casely-Hayford, announced Folarin as the winner of the £10,000 prize at a dinner held on July 8 at the Bodleian Library in Oxford.‘Miracle’ is a story set in Texas in an evangelical Nigerian church where the congregation has gathered to witness the healing powers of a blind pastor-prophet. Religion and the gullibility of those caught in the deceit that sometimes comes with faith rise to the surface as a young boy volunteers to be healed and begins to believe in miracles.Gus Casely-Hayford praised the story, saying: “Tope Folarin’s ‘Miracle’ is another superb Caine Prize winner – a delightful and beautifully paced narrative, that is exquisitely observed and utterly compelling”.Folarin is the recipient of writing fellowships from the Institute for Policy Studies and Callaloo, and he serves on the board of the Hurston/Wright Foundation. Folarin was educated at Morehouse College, and the University of Oxford, where he earned two master’s degrees as a Rhodes Scholar. He lives and works in Washington, D.C.last_img read more

Senate amends constitution and announces class council leaders

first_imgStudent senate passed 10 resolutions and two senatorial orders Wednesday night, making numerous changes to the constitution of the undergraduate student body and ordering the suspension of the rising junior and senior class council elections. Since the elections for both councils each had only one ticket, a senatorial order was proposed and passed for each class council to suspend the elections and declare the unopposed ticket the winner. For the rising senior class, the only ticket included Sara Dugan for president, Janet Stengle for vice president, Paul Stevenson for treasurer and Matthew Peters for secretary.The sole ticket for the class of 2019 listed Michael Conlon for president, Daniel Hopkinson for vice president, Eddie Griesedieck for treasurer and Jane Driano for secretary. (Editor’s Note: Eddie Griesedieck is a photographer for The Observer).All 10 of the resolutions were passed with strong support and included amending the responsibilities of the parliamentarian, off campus council and the departments of gender relations, University policy, student life, athletics, diversity and inclusion, faith and service, and health and wellness. A resolution indicating which members are required to attend the weekly executive cabinet meeting was also passed.Brian Fremeau, director of facilities for the Campus Crossroads project, gave a presentation to explain the plans for the addition of three new buildings surrounding the football stadium: Duncan Student Center, O’Neill Hall and Corbett Family Hall. He also discussed other enhancements to the stadium.Construction on Campus Crossroads, which began November 2014, is expected to conclude in August 2017. Fremeau’s presentation included images of the partially built rooms compared with artist’s representations of the finished interiors.Fremeau said the Duncan Student Center will not be open during the fall 2017 semester, as the various groups slated to occupy the space will be moving in. “We do expect in spring 2018, at the start of the semester, the doors will fly open and it will be open to everyone,” he said.Fremeau also said that while he cannot currently say which dining options will be available in the new student center, he expects this information to be publicly released soon.Notre Dame Day program director Pablo Martinez also delivered a presentation, discussing Notre Dame Day and the opportunities for club fundraising that it offers, as well as the opportunity to show alumni, parents and friends what students are doing.“It’s one way for us to really engage alumni, parents and friends when they’re not here on campus,” Martinez said. “A lot of people come back sometime during the fall for a football game or a tailgate or a reunion, but other than that people don’t know what’s going on — people don’t know the great work that students are doing. This is our way of showing them.”Julia Dunbar, director of health and wellness, announced that “Love Your Body Week” — hosted by the Gender Relation Center — will kick off Sunday with a talk on eating disorders. On Monday, a “Berry Brunch Break” will be provided in the LaFortune Student Center. The week will conclude with a yoga session, hosted by the McDonald Center for Student Well-Being.To conclude the meeting, student body vice president Becca Blais announced the Notre Dame Box Office is now selling $5 tickets for Show Some Skin, an event in which students anonymously submit stories to be performed by other students as monologues. The event, according to its website, “gives voice to unspoken stories about identity and difference.”Tags: Senate, Student Gov, Student governmentlast_img read more

ESG overlay ‘boosts outcomes for corporate bond investors’: report

first_imgIncorporating environmental, social and corporate governance (ESG) factors improves outcomes for corporate bond investors, according to a report from JP Morgan Asset Management.The asset manager found that ESG scores could enhance portfolio outcomes via lower drawdowns, reduced portfolio volatility and, in some cases, marginally increased risk-adjusted returns.Although its study showed that using ESG scores improved gross portfolio returns for all categories of corporate bonds, this only held true for investment grade corporate debt once transaction costs were accounted for.The study involved back-testing portfolios of investment grade, high yield and emerging market debt, comparing their benchmarks with a portfolio constructed using MSCI ESG scores. The asset manager also set out to find out whether ESG scores differed from traditional agency credit ratings, and said the study suggested that MSCI scores were “additive” to traditional credit ratings.“The contingent liabilities related to ESG issues are not necessarily factored into rating agencies’ assigned ratings,” said Lovjit Thukral, vice president for global fixed income, currency and commodities (GFICC) at the asset manager and report co-author with Bhupinder Bahra, co-head of the quantitative research group for GFICC.According to Thukral and Bahra, the study showed that MSCI’s ‘E’, ‘S’, and ‘G’ scores were generally not related to one another or to credit agency ratings. In the investment grade segment, the governance score was negatively related to credit agency ratings.Another result of the study was that ESG benchmarks (of issuers covered by MSCI) had an inherent quality bias in terms of the performance metrics.In 2017, Hermes Investment Management found that there was a significant relationship between companies’ ESG credentials and their credit spreads. It recently turned its attention to ESG risks in sovereign bond markets, as did BlueBay Asset Management.Rating agencies have moved to more clearly demonstrate how ESG considerations feed into their credit analysis in response to pressure from investors.last_img read more

Testing ramps up with over 10,000 test performed in 2 days

first_imgStatewide—The Indiana State Department of Health has reported that 634 additional Hoosiers have been diagnosed with COVID-19 today.  A total of 26,053 Indiana residents have tested positive for the coronavirus.  To date, 160,239 tests have been reported to ISDH at a 16.3% positive rate and 26 new deaths were reported for a total of 1,508 Hoosiers have died to date.Locally, Decatur County has a total of 216 positive cases and 31 deaths, Franklin County has 107 positive cases and 7 deaths, and Ripley County has 105 positive cases and 6 deaths.last_img