Limerick researcher makes quick work of three-sis

first_imgWATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads WhatsApp Advertisement Twitter Email Donal Ryan names Limerick Ladies Football team for League opener RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TAGSeducationhealthlimerickNewsResearch Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash Previous articleLA band to make a tour documentary in LimerickNext articleGovernment report claims Limerick parents pay €159 a week for childcare Alan Jacqueshttp://www.limerickpost.ie center_img Print Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick PhD student James Blackwell from Ballyneety.Photo: Sean Lydon.IT took a Limerick student just three minutes to explain the intricacies of finding brain tumours by ultrasound.James Blackwell from Ballineety was rewarded for his inventiveness when he was declared overall winner of this year’s NUI Galway’s Three-sis competition.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up The fast-paced event featured three-minute talks by 12 researchers who shared the story of their research using just three presentation slides, in front of three judges and a voting audience.James took the overall award for his bite-sized talk ‘Finding brain tumours using ultrasound’.The Limerick man is a PhD candidate split between the School of Physics and School of Mathematics, Statistics and Applied Mathematics at NUI Galway. His research involves using ultrasound to create stiffness maps of the brain. These can help surgeons to identify brain tumours and other diseases. His work is supported by the Irish Research Council.The Threesis competition was initiated at NUI Galway in 2012. It is open to all research students and postdoctoral researchers at NUI Galway. Finalists included undergraduate students, PhD candidates and postdoctoral researchers from across all Colleges on campus.Videos of the three winning presentations are available at www.nuigalway.ie/threesis NewsEducationHealthLimerick researcher makes quick work of three-sisBy Alan Jacques – December 27, 2018 1680 Linkedin Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live Facebooklast_img read more

School students assault staff

first_imgBay of Plenty Times 15 July 2013Children at 10 Western Bay primary schools have been stood down or suspended for physical assaults on school staff.Figures released to the Bay of Plenty Times under the Official Information Act reveal children at Arataki School, Maungatapu School, Merivale School, Otamarakau School, Otumoetai School, Tahatai Coast School, Tauranga Primary School, Te Puna School, Te Puke Primary School and Welcome Bay School were reprimanded for physical assaults on staff in 2012.Students at five of the region’s secondary schools were also suspended or stood down for the same offence.To protect student privacy, the Ministry of Education would not specify exactly how many students were stood down or suspended at each school, saying only that it was five or less at each. The ministry also did not know what injuries were sustained by staff or if weapons had been involved, as it did not keep this information.No one from the schools listed responded to messages left with them last week.Western Bay of Plenty Principals’ Association president Robert Hyndman said: “I think quite often some primary school teachers are having to deal with kids who might not know how to handle their emotions … especially younger children really distressed or upset for some reason.”Clinical psychologist Tanzi Bennison had seen an increase in children displaying aggression, “behaving their feelings rather than verbalising them”.“I’m surprised it’s got to the point where primary children are assaulting teaching staff but it fits with the overall picture of where we are headed. It’s very sad,” she said.“Quite often children will use aggressive behaviour to try and get their message across. If it works a few times … it is likely they will do it again. Eventually it will stop working, however, and the only thing they will know how to do is increase the aggression.”Ms Bennison said the “learned behaviour” was a reflection of what children experienced at home.http://www.bayofplentytimes.co.nz/news/school-students-assault-staff/1944820/last_img read more