The truth about mortgage disclosures: No signature required

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr continue reading » With mortgage rates at historic lows, many credit unions are seeing an increase in mortgage application volume and credit unions are looking for ways to speed up their processing times. Some credit unions attempt to decrease their mortgage turn times by going digital, as discussed in a blogs regarding online applications and electronic signatures. Other credit unions try to make the process easier by determining which of the many disclosures must be signed, and if those signatures must be obtained upfront or can be done throughout the process or at the signing table.Many of the mortgage disclosures provided to the member do not have a federal regulatory requirement for a signature. Rather, the regulations require that the credit union provide the disclosure, so in many cases it may be sufficient for the credit union to have procedures and documentation showing that the disclosure was sent. Even if there is no regulatory requirement for a signature, there could be secondary market considerations (such as if the credit union sells loans to Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac or other purchasers) as well as possible state law requirements.Borrower’s Verification Authorization None, because this is not a federally required disclosure. However, this disclosure may fulfill a third-party’s requirement to have signed consent to share information with the credit union.last_img read more

Protecting Fans

first_imgAs I am sure you have read or seen on TV, that there have been a number of serious injuries that have occurred to fans watching baseball games.  One lady, attending an American League game, was struck so hard that her life hung in the balance.  As expected, there is an outcry on social media wanting more protection at ball parks for the fans.  I am sure that MLB will try to add some form of protection to all of their ball parks.There are few solutions, however, that can keep every fan behind some form of protection.  It is hard to run a screen around a stadium that holds 50,000+ people.  The same can be said for plastic shields that are found behind home plate in some ball parks.  The easiest solution is for fans to pay attention when they attend a baseball game.  Sitting with your face in your phone is not very safe.  Most parks now have some type of disclaimer warning fans of the potential danger.I suppose one solution might be to put the stands farther back from the playing field, but this requires larger plots of ground which in large cities means millions more in costs.  You still could be hit with a batted ball if you are not paying attention.  I don’t believe there is any one solution that can solve this problem.last_img read more

The Row placed on probation once again

first_imgVice President of Student Affairs Michael L. Jackson placed The Row on social probation Thursday, prohibiting informal gatherings at fraternities on Tuesday and Thursday nights for the rest of the spring semester because of the recent negative events within the Greek community.Parties at fraternity houses will only be allowed Fridays and Saturdays, according to Jackson. These events must be reviewed and approved by the Office of Fraternity and Sorority Leadership Development.“If houses are found in violation of these instructions, they will be placed on immediate suspension pending a group judicial hearing,” Jackson wrote in an email. Jackson met with more than 150 leaders from USC fraternities and sororities Thursday to discuss the state of The Row, which has been plagued by behavioral problems and public incidents this year.“We discussed the collective responsibility chapters have for their members and that the Greek Councils have for their chapters,” Jackson wrote. This is the second time this year The Row has been placed on social probation.The Row was shut down Aug. 30, after 16 Interfraternity Council chapters were cited for unauthorized parties. Eight students were taken to the hospital for alcohol poisoning during what is often referred to by students as “Black Monday.”More recently, a misogynistic email sent on the Kappa Sigma fraternity listserv spread virally around campus and beyond, and graphic photos of a suspended member of Kappa Sigma appearing to have sex on the rooftop of Waite Phillips Hall made national news. Pat Lauer, president of IFC, said the leaders of USC fraternities and sororities understand how serious the situation is, and now they need to pass that message on to all of the Greek members.“Because of everything that’s happened, we need to get our act together completely and identify our weak points and improve upon them,” Lauer said. “It’s up to the leaders to help change the culture of the Greek community that has taken a negative turn.”At Thursday’s meeting, Jackson also established a task force composed of leaders of the various Greek councils and university staff from the USC Center for Women and Men and MenCare.Denzil Suite, associate vice president for Student Affairs, will be heading the task force, which will address issues including risk management, hazing, sexual assault, healthy relationships, alcohol and substance abuse, knowledge of USC policies, and chapter fire, health and safety programs.“I told students that we are depending on them to step up as leaders of their organizations, that [Student Affairs] will provide leadership, guidance and support, and that we want USC to have the strongest possible Greek community,” Jackson wrote.Lauer said the Greek community needs to make sure the negative attention from these actions does not conceal the positive things the Greek community brings to the university.“We’re kind of on thin ice right now, and we need to take it upon ourselves to confront these challenges we are faced with,” Lauer said.Jackson pointed out that USC’s Greek community has the highest GPA of any school west of the Mississippi and has received many national awards for service and leadership.“The hard work students devote to community service, philanthropic activity and participation in providing leadership for the broader USC student community is severely tarnished when members’ actions are arrogant, selfish, show a lack of respect for others, and threaten women in our community,” Jackson wrote.It is up to the members of the Greek community to change this negative perception, according to Lauer.“We owe it to ourselves to fix this image,” Lauer said.last_img read more

Josh Reddick did not change anything during August slump

first_img“At the same time, the team was winning. That made it a lot easier to cope with.”Things turned in late August. Reddick stopped hitting the ball as hard. He was “rolling over and striking out” and the frustration started to show in his body language. That was just the darkness before the dawn.Reddick started to come around during the Dodgers’ trip to Colorado at the end of August. In his final 24 games of the season, he went 29 for 76 (.382) with a .946 OPS.“I know I’m a really good hitter,” Reddick said. “I know that and I can help this team out a lot. It just hasn’t really been the case where I’m the guy carrying the team for a week. But that doesn’t seem to be the case of how it works on this team, one guy carrying the team. … That’s what’s great about this lineup. It can be scary good when it starts clicking on all cylinders.”Dodgers manager Dave Roberts is likely to continue spelling Reddick with Yasiel Puig against left-handed pitching (such as Nationals lefty Gio Gonzalez). Nonetheless, he recognizes Reddick is a valuable cylinder to have clicking.“It’s been a huge game-changer for us,” Roberts said of Reddick’s turnaround. “There are certain guys in the lineup who make you go. But when Josh was really scuffling, punching out way more than he’s used to, not making a lot of hard contact, there was a little void.“Right now, he’s got his legs under him. He’s taking good swings and barreling a lot of baseballs up. He’s always been a righty killer and we’re going to see our fair share of right-handers (in the post-season).”Closer callsThe 2016 postseason was just one game old when a manager (Baltimore’s Buck Showalter) was being second-guessed over how he used, or didn’t use, in Showalter’s case, his closer.Roberts said he watched the American League wild-card game Tuesday night and was surprised Showalter didn’t go to his closer, Zach Britton, against the Blue Jays, a decision for which Showalter is being roundly criticized.For his part, Roberts said he would not hesitate to use his closer, Kenley Jansen, to get more than three outs during a playoff game.“That’s certainly something we’ve talked about,” Roberts said. “I know Kenley is open to whatever we think is best for the team. Depending on the game situation. And in the postseason managers are typically more aggressive. It’s likely if it’s called for.”Roberts went to Jansen for “one-plus” saves six times during the regular season. Jansen converted four of the saves and blew two.Game 2The Nationals have announced who will throw out ceremonial pitches before Game 1 (Livan Hernandez) and Game 2 (Drake and Adam LaRoche) in Washington. But Nationals manager Dusty Baker has yet to announce his starting pitcher beyond Game 1 (Max Scherzer).As recently as Tuesday, Baker said it was “unsettled” who would follow Scherzer in the rotation. The choice is between right-hander Tanner Roark and Gonzalez, the lone left-hander in the Nationals’ rotation.If the Nationals do not start Gonzalez in Game 2, the Dodgers would face a left-handed starter just once in the best-of-five series despite finishing last in the majors in nearly every offensive statistic against left-handed pitching, including the lowest team batting average against lefties (.213) over a full season in 45 years. “I learned that probably last year,” Reddick said of his ‘less-is-more’ approach to problem-solving. “For the most part, when I’m going well, my cage work is limited to almost none at all. Pregame, right before the game, I go in there and do my routine.“I just told myself, ‘When I’m going well, I’m doing this.’ Then why am I going to do more when I’m struggling? My swing is going to be the same. There might be one switchup that I do. I might grab a short bat or do one new drill to get me back on track. I just realized that’s what it takes. If I’m not doing so much work when I’m going well, then I want to do the same thing when I’m not doing so well.”Reddick had two things that helped keep him from the natural urge to over-react to his slump: The Dodgers were winning without him and he was hitting the ball hard. The first gave him cover; the second gave him confidence.“I think that was the first time in my career I’ve struggled while hitting the ball so hard,” he said. “I think I was told for the whole month of August I had the highest exit velo(city) off the barrel with the lowest batting average.”That dubious honor wasn’t something Reddick wanted to hold for long. But “it told me I was doing everything right. WASHINGTON, D.C. >> August “wasn’t the worst time I’ve ever had in baseball,” Dodgers outfield Josh Reddick said. But it is definitely on the short list.“For that long of a time, you can’t help pressing and trying to do too much,” said Reddick, who went 11 for his first 79 at-bats with one extra-base hit and no RBIs in his first 23 games with the Dodgers.But Reddick found his way out of it by doing the hardest thing a slumping hitter can do: Nothing.He didn’t tinker with his swing. He didn’t change his stance or approach. He didn’t change his daily routine. He didn’t make any offerings to the baseball gods, though a statue of Jobu (the mythical god of slump-busting from the movie “Major League”) did appear in his locker.center_img Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Errorlast_img read more