On the go

first_imgBetween schoolwork and classes, a typical day in the life of a Harvard student is undoubtedly busy — but throw in playing on two sports teams and you’ve got a schedule rivaling that of Harvard President Drew Faust.Freshmen Morgan Powell and Mariah Pewarski are among a small group of Harvard students balancing life and school with two sports — in their case, lacrosse and field hockey.Though they admit it’s difficult to have a social life, and that practices and games consume most of their days, they wouldn’t have it any other way.“I did a couple of sports in high school, so I learned how to balance schoolwork and the practices, and not having weekends, really,” said Powell, a native of Saratoga Springs, N.Y.Same with Pewarski. She played field hockey and lacrosse throughout middle and high school in Garden City, N.Y., and said that she’s used to balancing the demands of school with the rigors and time commitment of sports.“I was prepared for the sacrifices that come with playing sports on a high level and getting my schoolwork done,” she said.Both women devoted spring break to practices. They attend morning classes to accommodate practices, too, which typically run from 3:30 p.m. to around 7 — every day. And they’re mindful of getting enough rest, with bedtimes before midnight, depending on workload.Because field hockey is a fall sport, and lacrosse is in spring, Powell and Pewarski are always in season. But they consider themselves lucky. After all, they’re never bored, and they even make time for volunteer work.Powell, who is considering fashioning a nutrition concentration, fell in love with the subject after doing community service with underprivileged children. “I love working with children and getting them off on the right foot in life with nutrition. I saw how much they looked up to me and how much of an impact I’ve had on their life.”The sometimes baker and self-confessed “band geek” (she plays trumpet!) will head home this summer in hopes of a nutrition and exercise physiology internship at a local college, and she’ll also take up her old waitressing job at Lillian’s, a popular restaurant for Saratoga Springs’ horse-racing set.“I volunteer at the Harvard Square Homeless Shelter and I am also participating in Relay For Life,” said Pewarski, who’s undecided about her concentration. “I recently have been leaning toward economics, but I haven’t abandoned the idea of going into science or math.”And unlike other freshmen who arrive at Harvard, settle in, and make friends on their own time, Powell and Pewarski arrived to a built-in support group and a pack of best friends for life — their teammates.“You find most of your friends in the athletic world,” said Powell. “It’s definitely difficult having a social life outside of sports, but for the most part it’s a good balance. Sports keep me grounded.”Said Pewarski: “A large portion of my schedule that I can’t fail to mention is the time I spend with other people I have met at Harvard not through sports. I have four roommates from all over the country, who all have many diverse interests. I spend a lot of time with them, whether it is on study breaks with my entryway, meals, BerryLine runs, or just time spent in our room.”The intensity and discipline of athletics in no way diminishes the fun these young women are having.“What I love about sports is the time I get to spend with my teammates and the experiences I receive from traveling with a team,” said Pewarski. A memorable experience from her field hockey season was visiting California for a few games and meeting a Harvard field hockey alumna who now works at Facebook, and who gave the team a tour of its headquarters.“Sports helped me to become a driven person in life,” said Powell. “A lot of what you do in sports translates into real life. You learn a lot of things you wouldn’t learn in a book.”last_img read more

Industriens hails role of active management in 2015 results

first_imgThe pension fund said 2015 had been a very unsettled year with many economic and political factors at play, and that this had increased risk on financial markets.While equities produced high returns in the first quarter, the picture then changed markedly over the course of April, and the turbulence continued for the rest of the year, it said.Industriens said it had made good returns in its DKK38.6bn portfolio of equities, with Danish shares producing 33.3% – 2.5 percentage points higher than the market as a whole – and foreign shares generating 6.4%, which beat the market by 3.4 percentage points.Mortensen said: “We invested in the right shares, and at the same time our external managers did well, which also shows the value creation of our active management for members’ pension savings.”Unlisted investments ended the year with an overall return of 15.7%, with private equity alone returning 21.9%.Its portfolio of unlisted investments in Denmark and abroad now totals DKK31.8bn, having been built up to this level over many years.Mortensen said unlisted investments contributed significantly to the total return, making a decisive difference at a time of low interest rates and instability on the financial markets, and that the assets had added stability to the whole portfolio.Fixed interest assets, however, produced low or negative returns.Nominal Gilt-edged bonds returned 0.5% in 2015, index-linked Gilts gave 1%, and corporate bonds – which make up 30.8% of the overall portfolio – made a 1.8% loss. Industriens Pension in Denmark has reported a 6.7% overall return for 2015 in preliminary annual results and said its active management produced a good level of outperformance.In absolute terms, the pension fund’s investments returned DKK8.6bn (€1.1bn).Back in November, the DKK147bn (€19.7bn) labour-market pension fund reported it had produced a pre-tax return of 3.8% for the first nine months of 2015.Laila Mortensen, Industriens Pension’s chief executive, said: “Both the active management of equities and bonds and unlisted asset classes delivered good results, which has ensured all members a significant return on their pension savings.”last_img read more

AP2 reports highest-ever results, makes 53% on Chinese equities

first_imgEva Halvarsson, chief executive officer of AP2, said: “All asset classes had a positive return and in particular, the world’s equity markets developed positively.”The fund’s Swedish equity portfolio returned a total 30.2%, while the developed markets foreign equity portfolio generated 31.7%. Emerging markets equities produced 19.9%.“The return on Chinese A shares was the fund’s best asset class with an annual return of 52.6%,” Halvarsson said.Over the years, she noted, AP2 had developed “unique expertise” in analysing the pension system’s development and needs in the future, in order to be able to construct the portfolio that provided the most benefit for the pension system.“In 2019 we have further supplemented the analysis by including the risks that climate change poses to economic growth,” she said.In its sustainability report – published alongside the annual report – AP2 said that looking ahead, it would continue to develop the integration of climate risk into its overall asset-liability management analysis.It also said it aimed to identify the main climate risks and opportunities for more asset classes, sectors and geographies, as well as finding out what their time horizon was.Having invested in green bonds since 2008 and included the environmentally-linked debt as a separate asset class in its portfolio since 2015, AP2 said it had now decided to lift the strategic allocation to green bonds to 3%, or just over SEK11bn.“During the year, there was continued strong growth in the market, with more issues and more organisations and companies issuing green as well as social bonds,” the fund said in its sustainability report.At the end of December, AP2 said it had over SEK14bn invested in green and social bonds. The first of Sweden’s mighty pension buffer funds to unveil 2019 results has announced its highest-ever results, generating SEK53bn (€5bn) in a bumper equities year when its holding of Chinese A shares produced a 52.6% return.Gothenburg-based AP2 also revealed it had increased its strategic weighting to green bonds to 3% last year from 1%, and included climate risk in its overall return assumptions, which form the basis for the choice of strategic portfolio.The other three of the main four government funds designed to back the Swedish state pension, AP1, AP3 and AP4 – all located in Stockholm – have yet to report 2019 results.Overall, AP2 said it made a return after costs of 15.9% last year, with total assets growing to SEK381.3bn by the end of December.last_img read more

5-year-old’s ‘Up’ photoshoot with great-grandparents goes viral

first_imgA 5-year-old boy who loves the movie “Up” partook in an “Up”-themed birthday photoshoot with his 90-year-old great-grandparents, Richard and Caroline Bain.Now, his mom’s uplifting photos are going viral!In the photos taken by Rachel Perman, her son Elijah dressed up as Russell while his great-grandparents dressed as Carl and Ellie Fredricksen.Perman said that her son had been obsessed with “Up” for years, adding, that Elijah only draws and colors the house with balloons featured in the movie, the only books he wants to get at the library, and it was the only toy he wanted when the family was in Disney World last year.She organized the photoshoot as a surprise and said his grandparents were “thrilled” to participate.last_img

USGA error rules Lauren out of US Open

first_img British champion Lauren Taylor has been ruled out of an automatic place in the 2012 US Women’s Open Championship following an error by the USGA. Earlier this month the USGA announced that, as British champion, Lauren would be exempt into the Open. This week they contacted the 17-year-old England international to apologise and explain that the news was incorrect.   The exemption will go instead to the winner of the 2012 British championship – who will claim her title in Carnoustie on 30 June, just five days before the US Women’s Open tees off at Blackwolf Run in Wisconsin. John Petrie, the chief executive of England Golf, commented: “It’s both a deeply unfair and a rather impractical decision. Having announced Lauren’s exemption and published it on their website it is just plain wrong to withdraw it. “Given the two events are just days apart, it rather assumes that a player will have booked flights and accommodation on the off-chance of winning the British title, which is in itself a physically and mentally draining week – not ideal preparation for a Major. The sensible solution is for the 2011 British amateur champion to play in the 2012 US Women’s Open and so on.” The news has created dismay and disbelief among Lauren’s 1600-plus Twitter followers. Among those asking the USGA to reconsider or issue a special invitation are Sky Sports Golf and Golf World.   Meanwhile, Lauren is accepting the news, keeping a low profile and has tweeted: “There are always speed bumps in the road to success. But you will come back stronger.” Her mother, Jackie, remarked: “Lauren is taking the news well and dealing with it with the maturity we know she possesses, having won such a great title at such a young age.” Lauren was 16 when she won the title and became the youngest-ever British champion. Her achievement was recognised before millions of television viewers when she went on to win the BBC Young Sports Personality of the Year Award. Picture Courtesy of: CalCarson Golf Agency 29 Feb 2012 USGA error rules Lauren out of US Open last_img read more